Hickory Haven Dulcimers - So, a Hickory Build

Kusani
Kusani
@kusani
one week ago
248 posts

Hi Art, It does sound very good. I find a big part of the fun in building is doing exactly as you; using woods from so many sources. 

ART pRIOR
ART pRIOR
@art-prior
one week ago
1 posts

Very nice job, I bet it sounds great! I have a local millwork shop that squares off a lot of 2 inch mahogany that leaves 1/10 to 1/4 inch strips several feet long that they used to put in their dumpster-----a great place to "go shopping"! They recently quit doing it, so I am glad I got what I did. Art

Robin Thompson
Robin Thompson
@robin-thompson
2 months ago
1,003 posts

Cool!  I'd love to hear it!  




--
Robin T
one of the Moderators here :)
Keep a song in your heart!
Susie
Susie
@susie
2 months ago
275 posts
Beautiful!
Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
2 months ago
1,791 posts

Good work, my friend!

Ken Longfield
Ken Longfield
@ken-longfield
2 months ago
646 posts

Very nice. I like the nut on the peg head. Those large fret markers are nice as well.

Ken

"The dulcimer sings a new song."

Kusani
Kusani
@kusani
2 months ago
248 posts

HH1.JPG HH2.JPGOur residence, located in the country, is called Hickory Haven. A local lumber mill which produces 2" x 2" x 48" billets for making tool handles has a scrap pile of reject hickory billets.  They use the rejects for fuel. As in Appalachia, settlers building dulcimers used whatever woods they had at hand. Ergo, I procured several of the billets. Re-sawed the billets to be able to fabricate some thin, 1/8" to 1/10" strips which then were butt glued to make thin boards approximately 8" in width. Steam bending some of the narrow strips provided the sides of the dulcimer. 

Taking a hickory nut from under one of our hickory trees and slicing it thin, yielded a nice decoration for the headstock. And yes, I still use cow hoof buttons as the large fret markers and deer antler at the bridge end of the fretboard. dulcimer

I am amazed at the sound. It is very clear and bright. As of now, it is going to be exhibited in the gallery at the Appalachian Center for Crafts outside Cookeville, Tn. Hopefully it will quickly find a home as a result of being on display.