complete list of possible DAd chords?

jp
@jp
3 weeks ago
33 posts
thanks just ordered Hellman’s on amazon
10.50 total. thanks
Ken Longfield
Ken Longfield
@ken-longfield
3 weeks ago
649 posts

jp, the two I use most often are Dulcimer Chord Book by Neal Hellman and Dulcimer Chord Encyclopedia by James Major. I don't know if they are still available as print books, but both are still available as eBooks.

Ken
"The dulcimer sings a sweet song."

jp
@jp
3 weeks ago
33 posts

Ken Longfield:

Thanks, jp. I went to the App Store on my iPhone and found it. There really wasn't much information there. I did not download it as I did not want to waste my money based on your experience. Besides, I already have two books of dulcimers chords plus charts downloaded from the Internet. I also use this lChord Wizard on my computer.

Ken

"The dulcimer sings a sweet song."

you did well Ken *L*.... what chord books do you use?

Ken Longfield
Ken Longfield
@ken-longfield
3 weeks ago
649 posts

Thanks, jp. I went to the App Store on my iPhone and found it. There really wasn't much information there. I did not download it as I did not want to waste my money based on your experience. Besides, I already have two books of dulcimers chords plus charts downloaded from the Internet. I also use this lChord Wizard on my computer.

Ken

"The dulcimer sings a sweet song."

jp
@jp
3 weeks ago
33 posts

Ken Longfield:

jp, do you have a link for it? When I put in "dulcimer" at the App Store, the only things that come up are two simple dulcimer tuners; one for DAA and one for DAd. Perhaps I am not finding it as I am searching on my MacBook Pro and not on my iPhone. I'm just curious to see the information about the app. Thanks.

Ken

"The dulcimer sings a sweet song."

Sorry Ken.... i did not use a link i used the app store on my iphone.... however i did use "Dulcimer Chords" for the search criteria .... good luck

Ken Longfield
Ken Longfield
@ken-longfield
3 weeks ago
649 posts

jp, do you have a link for it? When I put in "dulcimer" at the App Store, the only things that come up are two simple dulcimer tuners; one for DAA and one for DAd. Perhaps I am not finding it as I am searching on my MacBook Pro and not on my iPhone. I'm just curious to see the information about the app. Thanks.

Ken

"The dulcimer sings a sweet song."

jp
@jp
3 weeks ago
33 posts
it works on my iphone 4 (old old old!! ios 7.2)
but not on my ios 12 device (latest update)
it is in the App store just looked it up at least it shows up on both my devices. but like i said it only works on my old device
Good luck!
Ken Longfield
Ken Longfield
@ken-longfield
3 weeks ago
649 posts

I went to Apple's App Store but was unable to find Dulcimer Chords. My feeling is that if it isn't in the App Store it will not work in an Apple environment.

Ken

"The dulcimer sings a sweet song."

Brian G.
Brian G.
@brian-g
3 weeks ago
110 posts

Thanks jp. I'm sorry it didn't work for you.  I don't think it was ever designed as an ipod app. Has anyone tried it one an iphone?  I also didn't realize it's now $6.50.

 

[/quote]

it cost about 6.50 dollars... i bought it for my ipod (yes it is available for apple) and it does not work.... just a warning.

[/quote]

 

jp
@jp
3 weeks ago
33 posts

Brian G.:

Hi all.

Just wanted to mention that in addition to the books and web resources already mentioned, there is at least one good app available if you are an Android user. It's called Dulcimer Chords and is available here.

This app contains hundreds of chords - you specify the chord you are interested in, and the app will return multiple versions of the chord and how/where to play it on the fretboard.

I believe it was free when I originally downloaded it, but I can't tell now - when I go to that page it is listed as already installed for me, so I don't know whether, as has been the case for many apps, it now costs something.

Disclaimer - I have no interest in this app financially - I downloaded it awhile ago, and I occasionally use it to quickly find a chord without thinking.  It works as advertised and I thought I'd mention it here. Hope someone finds this useful.

 

it cost about 6.50 dollars... i bought it for my ipod (yes it is available for apple) and it does not work.... just a warning.

Brian G.
Brian G.
@brian-g
one month ago
110 posts

Hi all.

Just wanted to mention that in addition to the books and web resources already mentioned, there is at least one good app available if you are an Android user. It's called Dulcimer Chords and is available here.

This app contains hundreds of chords - you specify the chord you are interested in, and the app will return multiple versions of the chord and how/where to play it on the fretboard.

I believe it was free when I originally downloaded it, but I can't tell now - when I go to that page it is listed as already installed for me, so I don't know whether, as has been the case for many apps, it now costs something.

Disclaimer - I have no interest in this app financially - I downloaded it awhile ago, and I occasionally use it to quickly find a chord without thinking.  It works as advertised and I thought I'd mention it here. Hope someone finds this useful.

 

Lois Sprengnether Keel
Lois Sprengnether Keel
@lois-sprengnether-keel
2 months ago
124 posts

Ken Hulme:

A complete list of chords is called a Chord Chart.  Go to the Strother's Chord Wizard, plug in the chord you want to play, and it will show you where to press which strings to get (or not) that chord.

If you google mountain dulcimer DAd Chord Chart and look at the Images, you'll find a lot of charts to pick from.

WOW!  Thank you, Ken!  I found it at http://www.strothers.com/chords.html and put in DAA since I go first to Ionian tunings and it's possible!  I was going to see about starting a similar discussion.  Also with my starting to play the baritone dulcimer I'm trying other keys (actually CGG is my "Go to" key on my non-baritone dulcimer.sun

zaulden
@zaulden
2 months ago
6 posts

Great information!  I really appreciate your patience and advice, folks.  Thank you!

I particularly find the information from Dusty very interesting about the two-note "chords" - it seems like a simple system for improvising quickly.  I'll have to mess around with it.  Last night I fooled around with "real" three-note chords - D, A, and G, and it was cool, but it definitely seemed more limiting than my ukulele where I can strum anything I need since it's chromatic.

I really like the noter-style, which is what drew me to the instrument, but adding some chords to my bucket to strum along with a song is not unwelcome!

Dusty Turtle
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
2 months ago
1,051 posts

Yes, Neal Hellman's book is the dulcimer chord bible and has been for many years.  It is shaped so that you can easily fit it into your dulcimer case.  As Strumelia notes, it contains chords not just for DAd but for a variety of different tunings.

On his website Stephen Seifert has posted chord charts for both DAd and DAA.  You can find the DAd charts here.

The answer to your second question, about what keys you can play in, is more complicated.  If you don't have any extra frets there are some notes you simply don't have.  So you can't play in every key.  However, if you just want to strum chords, you can play in more keys than you might think.

We pretend the open strings are a D chord.  So 0-0-0 is a D chord.  If we just go up one fret at a time (and one letter of the alphabet), that means 1-1-1 is an E chord, 2-2-2 is an F#, 3-3-3 is a G, 4-4-4 is an A, 5-5-5 is a B, 6-6-6 is a C, 6+-6+-6+ is a C#, and 7-7-7 is another D.  

Just using those barre chords, you can play the three main chords in the keys of D (DGA), E (EAB), F# (F#BC#), G (GCD), A (ADE), and B (BEF#).

And the reason I say we "pretend" that the open strings represent a D chord is that we only get two notes, D and A, or the 1st and 5th notes of the scale. We are missing the 3rd. In a D major chord, that third is an F# and in a D minor chord, that third is an F.  So the open strings are really a partial D chord which can function as either major or minor.  The same is true of the other barre chords; 1-1-1 can be an E or an E minor, and so forth.  What I find so cool about this is that your ear will fill in the third, so when that 1-1-1 is supposed to be an E minor, your ear will hear an E minor chord, even though you are not playing the part of the chord that would make it minor.  Pretty nifty, huh?

So the number of chords at our disposal even just using that one chord shape, is pretty good.  And when you start adding other chord shapes (L-shaped chords, slants, extended slants) you get other voicings and some other options.

And if you use your noggin a little, some ingenuity will get you the other keys.  What if someone wants to play a tune in Eb?  Pretty odd key, right?  But you are only a half tone below that in DAd. So you could retune all your strings up a half note to EbAbeb and then you can easily play the three main chords: Eb, Ab, and Bb by playing where you would normally find your D, G, and A chords.  A little ingenuity goes a long way.

Keep in mind that just because you can play partial versions of the three main chords in all those keys that I listed does not mean you will be able to play the melodies of every song in those keys.  The diatonic fretboard just does not have every note you will need.  But just for chording, you can get pretty far.




--
Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

As a musician, you have to keep one foot back in the past and one foot forward into the future.
-- Dizzy Gillespie

updated by @dusty-turtle: 09/20/18 11:01:57PM
Elvensong
Elvensong
@elvensong
2 months ago
27 posts

Strumelia:

Neal Hellman has written a very comprehensive 64 page handy booklet showing mtn dulcimer chords in multiple tunings, including DAd.

 

Neal's chord book was given to me by my friend and was the only info I had when I first started playing long before the internet. It started me on my dulcimer journey!

 

Strumelia
Strumelia
@strumelia
2 months ago
1,881 posts

Neal Hellman has written a very comprehensive 64 page handy booklet showing mtn dulcimer chords in multiple tunings, including DAd.

https://www.melbay.com/Products/94662/dulcimer-chord-book.aspx

https://www.amazon.com/Mel-Bay-Dulcimer-Chord-Book/dp/1562222481

It's long been considered an extensive reference tool for finding chords, and it's not expensive.

To get a head start, use Google Image to quickly find the most basic chords in DAd:

Dad dulcimer chord chart images on Google




--
Site Owner

Those irritated by grain of sand best avoid beach.
-Strumelia proverb c.1990
Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
2 months ago
1,795 posts

A complete list of chords is called a Chord Chart.  Go to the Strother's Chord Wizard, plug in the chord you want to play, and it will show you where to press which strings to get (or not) that chord.

If you google mountain dulcimer DAd Chord Chart and look at the Images, you'll find a lot of charts to pick from.

zaulden
@zaulden
2 months ago
6 posts

I've mainly been learning noter style on my mountain dulcimer in DAd tuning.  DAd noter-style matches the D tin whistle note progression I'm used to from playing that instrument.  From tin whistle, I know the scales I can play amount to giving me the major keys of D and G (and related minor keys), and it's the same in a DAd-tuned dulcimer played noter-style from what I can tell so far (My dulcimer has a C Natural fret).  I can play any of my D-tin-whistle sheet music.

What about if I start trying some chords while tuned DAd?  Do I also only get chords that go with the keys of D and G (and related minors)?  Would I need to retune the dulcimer to be able to do chords for other keys?  Is there a complete list of possible DAd chords anyone could direct me to?  Thanks.