Norwegian Wood

dianapalmer
@dianapalmer
3 months ago
20 posts

I like this a lot! I also play it on my Sweetwoods dulcimer, which has a 1-1/2 fret. My newest dulcimer, named Georgia, is a wonder, but has no 1-1/2 fret. Nice to see an arrangement I can perhaps learn to play on my new dulcimer.

Brian G.
@brian-g
4 years ago
103 posts

Thank you Scott!

Scott Allen
@scott-allen
4 years ago
27 posts

Excellent Brian!

Brian G.
@brian-g
4 years ago
103 posts

Hi Martie!

Thank you for this and your other comments. I am glad that you enjoyed it, and wish you the best of luck in learning it. It's one of my favorite Beatles tunes.

Martie Richmond said:

I just love this song, and as a beginner, look forward to the day i can so effortlessly make it happen! Your version is really lovely.

Brian G.
@brian-g
4 years ago
103 posts

Hello Joyce and James. Thank you for your kind comments. I'm glad you enjoyed the video. Joyce, I'm sorry I didn't see your comment until now. I will have to look to see if I have the tab I created (It's been awhile.) Because this is a copyrighted tune I can't post it here, but if I find the tab I will message you and we can go from there...

Thanks again!

James Phillips
@james-phillips
4 years ago
95 posts

I've played this video before - great rendition! It really works nice on the dulcimer.

Joyce Hibbard
@joyce-hibbard
4 years ago
6 posts

Hi Brain, I watched your video over, and over from the internet.The club I'm in is trying to play it.You make it look so easy. I have been trying to learn it just by watching you and listening, ( I play by ear).But not having very good results. You memtioned about having the Tab for it posted some where. Could you post it again on your page, or in "looking for a TAB" ?I sure would be thankful if it's possible. Just love the way you play, with such ease, and it sounds so beautiful.Joyce

Brian G.
@brian-g
5 years ago
103 posts

Hi Quinn,

A recent discussion about Norwegian Wood by a new member of FOTMD let me back to this thread, and I had not seen your post until now. I just wanted to say you're welcome, and I'm glad that you found the conversation/posts useful.

Kind regards,

Brian

Quinn Golden said:

I know this thread is kinda' old, but I just found it and wanted to chime in and thank you Brian, Dusty and Ken for answering this question in a straightforward manner that those of us without music theory background can understand. I often have similar questions, and find where others have asked them, but the answers often get so verbose and the answersometimesspark a debate that the original question is lost and leave the questioner (or those of us withsimilarquestions, trolling these threads) more confused than we started.

I think that is one of the primary reasons why folks do not ask questions, and why beginners sometime fail to reach their self expectations and why instruments move from the living room to the closet. Thank you for taking that reason away, and for making more of us feel comfortable here.Grin.gif

Quinn Golden
@quinn-golden
5 years ago
15 posts

I know this thread is kinda' old, but I just found it and wanted to chime in and thank you Brian, Dusty and Ken for answering this question in a straightforward manner that those of us without music theory background can understand. I often have similar questions, and find where others have asked them, but the answers often get so verbose and the answersometimesspark a debate that the original question is lost and leave the questioner (or those of us withsimilarquestions, trolling these threads) more confused than we started.

I think that is one of the primary reasons why folks do not ask questions, and why beginners sometime fail to reach their self expectations and why instruments move from the living room to the closet. Thank you for taking that reason away, and for making more of us feel comfortable here.Grin.gif

Brian G.
@brian-g
6 years ago
103 posts

Ken, thanks for answering John. (Long day at work today and didn't have a chance to get on here and see the question.)

Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
6 years ago
1,460 posts

John - the upper and lower case Ds are an octave apart. Lower case d is an octave higher in pitch than upper case D. If you use DAD instead of DAd, a lot of newbies (and others) will try and tune the two Ds to the same pitch...

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
6 years ago
886 posts

Bill,to fully understand intervals and all their nuances is indeed complicated. However, to just get the idea is pretty simple.

Let's ignore sharps and flats for the moment. The musical alphabet involves seven letters: A, B, C, D, E, F, G. So if you start on an A note and count up,with A being the first, B will be the second, C will be the third, D will be th fourth, E will be the fifth, F will be the sixth, G will be the seventh,and the second A you come to will be the eighth (it's called the octave, meaning eighth). Tuned in A, then, a 1-5-8 tuning would be AEa. (Remember that there are some sharps involved, but we are ignoring them for the moment.)

You could also start on C, which is easy if you can visualize a piano because C reallydoes have no sharps andflats:C, D, E, F, G, A, B, and back to C. In this case,C is the first, G is the fifth, and the octave or eighth note of the diatonic scale will be the next C. Tuned in C, a 1-5-8 tuning would be CGc.

Personally, I use both those tunings, AEa on a baritone dulcimette and CGc when I fingerpick (I like the softer, looser strings). But most of us play most of the time in D. The same pattern works: D=1, E=2, F=3, G=4, A=5, B=6, C=7, and D=8. Again, we are ignoring sharps for the moment, but that reveals that in the key of D, a 1-5-8 tuning would be DAd.

As Brian has explained, the advantage of stating that a tuning is 1-5-8 is that it allows us to follow the fingering regardless of what key our instrument is tuned to. If you like to be tuned DAd, Brian likes to be tuned C#G#c#, and I like to be tuned AEa, we can all follow the same tab or watch the same fingering and learn a song.

Hopefully I've clarified and not confused the issue. Oh, and in my family we don't stew on things, we percolate on them. I'm not sure what the difference would be except that percolatin' is mostly done in the mornings. Something can stew all day long. But if it's been brewing for a while, look out!




--
Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

"A good song makes you laugh, it makes you cry, it makes you think."
-- Pete Seeger
Brian G.
@brian-g
6 years ago
103 posts

Hi Bill! Sure thing: DAd. :)

Basically, when you see something like 1-5-8 it's just specifying the 1st, 5th, 8th notes of a major scale, so if we are talking about D major, that would be D, A and d. The thing is, I'm often *not* playing in D. I often tune this dulcimer down a little lower, say to C#, G#, c# instead. That's still the 1st, 5th, and 8th notes of the C# major scale, so calling it 1-5-8 still works. So with a notation like 1-5-8, you are specifying the relative values of the notes, rather than the absolute values, and it's correct no matter what you tune your bass string to.

Does that make sense?

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
6 years ago
886 posts

I don't think I ever recorded it, Brian. And I don't really do anything with it other than play the melody with a few chords here and there. Let me dig it out of the mental archives and see if it's worth recording.




--
Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

"A good song makes you laugh, it makes you cry, it makes you think."
-- Pete Seeger
Brian G.
@brian-g
6 years ago
103 posts

Thanks Dusty! Feel free to "steal" whatever you'd like. :) Is your current version posted anywhere? I'd love to hear it.

Dusty Turtle said:

That's really nice, Brian. I play the songona dulcimer with the 1-1/2 fret, but I guess using a capo at the first fret accomplishes the same thing. I really like the harmony you use on the B part. I may have to steal an idea or two and incorporate them into my version.

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
6 years ago
886 posts

That's really nice, Brian. I play the songona dulcimer with the 1-1/2 fret, but I guess using a capo at the first fret accomplishes the same thing. I really like the harmony you use on the B part. I may have to steal an idea or two and incorporate them into my version.




--
Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

"A good song makes you laugh, it makes you cry, it makes you think."
-- Pete Seeger
Brian G.
@brian-g
6 years ago
103 posts

Hi all,

I had posted a version of this in one of the Groups, and was asked if I could post it in a more public spot. So here it is. This is a version of Norwegian Wood, one of my favorite Beatles tunes.

Norwegian Wood

Kind regards,

Brian


updated by @brian-g: 01/16/16 10:34:39AM