Remote Teacher Sought

Msmouce
Msmouce
@msmouce
2 weeks ago
5 posts

Jim Phillips:

I highly recommend Brett Ridgeway.  He does do remote lessons.

I've been using Brett's online lessons, and they are really, really good. He goes slowly (especially good for beginners), and he is responsive to questions....I have not encountered a single online lesson in which he made the lesson into an opportunity to "perform." I highly recommend him!https://www.youtube.com/user/fbridgeway ---He goes slowly enough that I can adjust for my damaged hands.

 

Janene Millen
Janene Millen
@janene-millen
3 years ago
29 posts

Having had a lesson (and a half) with Aaron O'Rourke on Skype, I can say he really tailors his approach to your level and interests. I'm just sorry I never ironed out the technical issues on my end..and was unable to continue.  He's so versatile...and teaches with such good humor nod 

Aaron O'Rourke
Aaron O'Rourke
@aaron-orourke
3 years ago
5 posts

Dusty Turtle:

I think the place to start is for you to decide what kind of music you want to play and what specific skills you want to develop.  Secondly, you might ask whose playing most inspires you. Seek out that person and explain what it is you want to work on.  Honest teachers will tell you if they can help you.  If you don't know what you want or need to work on, you might ask a teacher for an assessment.

With so many different styles and technical approaches to the dulcimer, I don't think there is any better advice. Well said, Dusty.


updated by @aaron-orourke: 03/14/16 09:03:58PM
Dusty Turtle
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
3 years ago
1,049 posts

Dana, you've already received good recommendations and offers for remote lessons. Most dulcimer teachers nowadays offer lessons like that. I've taken a couple of Skype lessons with Stephen Seifert and Mark Gilston.  I also offer remote lessons to a couple of a couple of my students who live far enough away so that it doesn't pay to travel for a 30- or even 60-minute lesson.  I use both Skype and Zoom.  Remote lessons are almost as good as in-person lessons and can be really convenient.

I think the place to start is for you to decide what kind of music you want to play and what specific skills you want to develop.  Secondly, you might ask whose playing most inspires you. Seek out that person and explain what it is you want to work on.  Honest teachers will tell you if they can help you.  If you don't know what you want or need to work on, you might ask a teacher for an assessment.




--
Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

As a musician, you have to keep one foot back in the past and one foot forward into the future.
-- Dizzy Gillespie
Linda W. Collins
Linda W. Collins
@linda-w-collins
3 years ago
30 posts

I do remote lessons using Zoom, a free download.  I offer a free lesson to sort out the technology; then, if we are both comfortable, we schedule for real.  I lived in Ireland for 10 years and play much Celtic music, with chords.  You can also check on my book, Beyond the Basics and the free tab on my website.  PM me if interested in talking it over.

Linda Collins

www.cabinhillmusic.com

D. chitwood
D. chitwood
@d-chitwood
3 years ago
139 posts

Yall have inspired me and I will be reaching out/checking into many ideas here1

Jan Potts
Jan Potts
@jan-potts
3 years ago
434 posts

Having heard Rob play, I'd definitely take him up on that!  He plays the kind of music you like, too!

 

 




--
Jan Potts, Lexington, KY
Site Moderator

"Use what talents you possess; the woods would be very silent if no birds sang there except those that sang best." Henry Van Dyke
Rob N Lackey
Rob N Lackey
@rob-n-lackey
3 years ago
445 posts

I've been wanted to try to give a remote lesson.  Thought I had someone lined up to do it, and they seem to not be here since our move.  (Yes, I know that was a while ago, but that's how it is  LOL.)  I'll give you the same offer I gave them: 2 free ones to see how it works out.  If interested, follow me and send me a pm so we can work out a time.

 

Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
3 years ago
1,497 posts

Drones are strings which are not fretted, but still strummed.  When Fingerdancing you generally use more than one finger to play the melody on the melody string(s), while the middle and bass string just hummmm along.  A noter is a stick which takes the place of your finger for pressing down the melody string(s).

I'd be happy to work with you on those styles, but I don't play chords across all three course of strings.


updated by @ken-hulme: 03/05/16 05:59:53PM
Jan Potts
Jan Potts
@jan-potts
3 years ago
434 posts

Are you by chance in northern Georgia?  Dulcimer U is held at Western Carolina University in Cullowhee, NC, for a week at the end of July.  Lots of good teaching there, and some classes are specifically for the type of music you like.




--
Jan Potts, Lexington, KY
Site Moderator

"Use what talents you possess; the woods would be very silent if no birds sang there except those that sang best." Henry Van Dyke
Jan Potts
Jan Potts
@jan-potts
3 years ago
434 posts

I think STeve Eulburg (Eulberg?) does remote lessons, too.

Drone refers to playing (fretting) on the melody string and strumming all the strings....the other 2 strings, then, don't change their pitch, so they "drone" much like a bagpipe does.

 




--
Jan Potts, Lexington, KY
Site Moderator

"Use what talents you possess; the woods would be very silent if no birds sang there except those that sang best." Henry Van Dyke
Jim Phillips
Jim Phillips
@jim-at-gcreek
3 years ago
9 posts

I highly recommend Brett Ridgeway.  He does do remote lessons.

Dan Goad
Dan Goad
@dan-goad
3 years ago
164 posts

I would list Steve Seifert's "Dulcimer School" at the top of my list. dulcimerschool.com is the url.  Both Dusty Turtle and I are 'charter' members and I think Dusty will agree with me on it's excellence.  Dulcimer School takes you from the simple fundamentals of playing to as far as you want to go with your playing.  You are encouraged to work at your own pace and can go back to any lesson at any time to work on you're techniques. 

 

Terminology:  Fiingerdancing is using your fingers to fret the melody string instead of a noter.  The drone in 'noter/drone' is the sound of the unfretted middle and bass strings in noter/drone (fingerdance) style of play.  When you are fretting the melody/middle/bass strings in various combinations (chords) you are playing chord/melody style.

 

Happy strumming.

 

D. chitwood
D. chitwood
@d-chitwood
3 years ago
139 posts

I'm mainly wanting to learn the fingering technique, make sure I'm not forming any reaaaally bad habits (slightly bad I'm okay giggle2 ). The types of music I spend hours practicing are Celtic airs and jigs, things like Cockles and mussels, Dark Island, Catherine tyrell, Comin' o'er the Rye....things like that. I don't intend to join a band or sell CDs. I just want to absorb everything I can learn so I can make a sweet song (stolen from Ken's signature up above ) wasntme

I listened to one of Steve's lesson videos and he went over my head so fast on Rosin the Bow I think I need to save him for down the road. Aware of Bing. I try to copy him when I practice. Not heard of Brett. Will look him up.

Ken Hulme, finger dancing? I know what a noter is but not sure what you mean about drone. I think I should take one lesson from about four different folks and see what the best fit is. 

Ken Longfield
Ken Longfield
@ken-longfield
3 years ago
552 posts

Two people that come immediately to mind are Bing Futch and Steve Seifert. I think Brett Ridgeway may also give lessons that way. I know all of them and feel that they would do well. Here are some links: http://www.bingfutch.comhttp://www.stephenseifert.com/private-lessons/http://www.brettridgewaymusic.com/Lessons.html, and I don't know if this one is interactive: http://www.dulcimercrossing.com .

Ken

"The dulcimer sings a sweet song."

Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
3 years ago
1,497 posts

How do you go about it?  You just did!thumbsup

I'd work with you, but you probably aren't interested in Noter & Drone or Fingerdancing.

 

D. chitwood
D. chitwood
@d-chitwood
3 years ago
139 posts

I have a couple of groups I play with and friends to jam with but I want one on one instruction from someone who is waaay better than me and has years under his/her dulcimer strap.

 

I'm looking for someone who is kind and a good teacher. How does one go about finding someone who can give lessons via skype or Facetime?