Weird Foods You’ve Eaten

Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
2 weeks ago
1,628 posts

As a semi-professional foodie, I'll try almost anything  -- Uni, sushi of any kind, monkey brains, menudo, dried grasshoppers  -- you name it.  Lots of those things I'd eat again readily.  But....  I just can't take raw oysters.  It's a texture thing.  Breaded & fried, sure.  Likewise oyster stew.  But not raw. 

Massive dislike of boiled okra for the same reason -- slimy texture.  Love 'em breaded/fried or split and fried with Amchur in the Indian style.

Dusty Turtle
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
2 weeks ago
1,139 posts

You guys can have all the rocky mountain oysters you want. I'll stick to just plain oysters. No cooking necessary. The smaller the better. Paired with a cold and crisp white Bordeaux.




--
Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

As a musician, you have to keep one foot back in the past and one foot forward into the future.
-- Dizzy Gillespie
Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
2 weeks ago
1,628 posts

I've had them sliced thin, and cut into pieces.  I suspect they may be like calamari or gator -- overcooked and you have rubber; cooked properly you hve nirvana on a plate.


updated by @ken-hulme: 10/05/19 10:57:05PM
Phroedrick
Phroedrick
@phroedrick
2 weeks ago
52 posts

Ken Hulme:

I like cow's tongue, but not Rocky Mountain Oysters are too chewy for me.  I love cabrito -- we have Cuban restaurants around here who do a sort of goat osso bucco which is outstanding.  

Rocky Mountain Oysters aren’t meant to be eaten whole. Try cutting them up next time. :—)

PaulinPhoenix
PaulinPhoenix
@paulinphoenix
2 weeks ago
5 posts

A  big ol' plate of stewed bear meat and a bowl of ramps - at a fundraiser "bear supper" in beautiful Pence Springs, WV.

David Bennett
David Bennett
@david-bennett
3 months ago
64 posts

What every mountain dulcimer player needs to try...I've had mountain oysters when I lived out west in Texas & Oklahoma. Actually, very tasty. 

Phroedrick
Phroedrick
@phroedrick
3 months ago
52 posts

Dusty Turtle:

A hot dog is weird enough for me. Who even knows what it's made of?  Probably all that stuff that @Phroedrick lists as a no go.

Ate smoked duck heart once on a salad in France. It was tasty.

Ordered scrapple by accident in a greasy spoon in Pennsylvania or maybe the Jersey shore.  I won't do it again.

There are lots of Mexican joints around town that serve fresh menudo on weekends. On Saturday nights especially the line to some of these places can run for blocks.  I won't touch the stuff.  Sorry.

I forgot to mention SPAM flavor macadamia nuts that are sold in Hawaii. They taste okay. It’s just an amusing thing to use as a flavoring.

Dusty Turtle
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
3 months ago
1,139 posts

A hot dog is weird enough for me. Who even knows what it's made of?  Probably all that stuff that @Phroedrick lists as a no go.

Ate smoked duck heart once on a salad in France. It was tasty.

Ordered scrapple by accident in a greasy spoon in Pennsylvania or maybe the Jersey shore.  I won't do it again.

There are lots of Mexican joints around town that serve fresh menudo on weekends. On Saturday nights especially the line to some of these places can run for blocks.  I won't touch the stuff.  Sorry.




--
Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

As a musician, you have to keep one foot back in the past and one foot forward into the future.
-- Dizzy Gillespie
Phroedrick
Phroedrick
@phroedrick
3 months ago
52 posts

Okay, tongue is fine, on the menu, actually very good. Kidneys, lungs, hearts, gizzards, chicken feet, all no. And topping my NO WAY list is the sushi specialty with Uni (sea urchin guts—orange in color) wrapped in seaweed and topped with a raw quail egg. Must add a taco, considered a delicacy south of the border made with the tender parts of cow eyes. Ate it once, and it was good. However, through the entire meal I had the eerie feeling something was watching me. giggle2

Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
3 months ago
1,628 posts

I like cow's tongue, but not Rocky Mountain Oysters are too chewy for me.  I love cabrito -- we have Cuban restaurants around here who do a sort of goat osso bucco which is outstanding.  

Skip
Skip
@skip
3 months ago
240 posts

My Dad fixed tongue [cow] which was then sliced. Had some good haggis and neeps [mashed turnips] in Scotland. Germans have magen [tripe] soup and pickled herring sandwiches. Both are good. Fifty- fifty beer and carbonated lemonade [Germany]. Tried menudo, bleh and cabrito [young goat]. Supreme pizza with anchovies. Alligator and some of the other regional Southern foods, most of which is pretty good [that I've tried]. I'm sure there are more western European dishes I've tried, but it's been 30+ years ago.

Tried Crow a few times, don't like it at all.whistle


updated by @skip: 07/24/19 10:37:50AM
Salt Springs
Salt Springs
@salt-springs
3 months ago
153 posts

Yup, the black pudding is OK and some of the Haggis I've had is pretty good.   But the Tom Thumb was pretty rough.........it was basically organ meat and suet, fermented then smoked.  Even that can be ok, depending on what meats are used and how it is smoked.  Same with the Hassel, only it is stewed instead of made into the sausage then potato, onion etc. added.   I guess it's the lungs (lights) that bugged me.

I'm with you on the tripe, the noodle and noodles. 

Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
3 months ago
1,628 posts

I eat Haggis and Black (a.ka. Blood) Pudding every time we go to the UK.  I actually like both and would rather eat them than American Scrapple or Head Cheese, Braunschweiger or Goose Liver pate.  I'm not otherwise fond of organ meats -- particularly the Mexican soup called Menudo -- cow stomach tripe in broth.

I've had Potted Rabbit, too, which appears in those Victorian novels, and is just a nice patè -- like Deviled Ham but not spicy -- and goes great on crackers.  Very tasty.

The one thing I've eaten that I'll never touch again unless protocol and international relationships are at stake is Monkey Brains.  I was served this delicacy at a Vietnamese party; a homecoming for my housemaid's husband.  Doesn't taste like much except spicy chiles, but has a weird texture... Blah!


updated by @ken-hulme: 07/24/19 08:15:27AM
Phroedrick
Phroedrick
@phroedrick
3 months ago
52 posts

Salt Springs:

Tom Thumb, a type of Haggis...........common among the Carolina Scotts of days gone by...........I think you can only develop a taste for it after a couple of pulls off a Mason Jar full of fresh shine (check for bubbles).  The other thing some folks used to fix was called hog hassel, same beverage applies. 

Salt Springs:

Tom Thumb, a type of Haggis...........common among the Carolina Scotts of days gone by...........I think you can only develop a taste for it after a couple of pulls off a Mason Jar full of fresh shine (check for bubbles).  The other thing some folks used to fix was called hog hassel, same beverage applies. 

Ordered Haggis once on a business trip to Scotland—for breakfast no less. I didn’t know what it was and didn’t ask. I just thought I’d try something different. Well, different it was. I could barely eat it. That little door at the back of my throat kept slamming shut. Later I looked up the ingredients and, even though it was years later, nearly tossed cookies. Good and drunk, I’m sure it must taste wonderful. Many things do. Never had Hog Hassel. What’s it made of?

Salt Springs
Salt Springs
@salt-springs
3 months ago
153 posts

Tom Thumb, a type of Haggis...........common among the Carolina Scotts of days gone by...........I think you can only develop a taste for it after a couple of pulls off a Mason Jar full of fresh shine (check for bubbles).  The other thing some folks used to fix was called hog hassel, same beverage applies. 

Phroedrick
Phroedrick
@phroedrick
3 months ago
52 posts

Over the weekend went to visit some old friends of mine and my wife. They came here from Russia ages ago, became citizens, opened a very successful restaurant and ran it for years until they recently retired. Along the way, they preserved their culture in the food they served. Some, that they didn’t offer on the menu, they serve when friends come to visit.

Foods, like what, you could well ask. I would describe some of them if I knew what they’re called. My wife, being Russian born, knows all the names and such, and eats it all with gusto. So, back to the weird food topic I started.

On Sunday morning, our friends pulled a jar of preserves out to go with breakfast. Through the jar, I could only make out dark inside contents that looked like small blackberries. I dug in for a small serving and noticed it wasn’t made from blackberries. I put some on my toast and downed it. Not bad. Turned out the blackberry-looking things were small pine cones. Yes, actual, tiny pine cones pummeled into a preserve by hours of stewing, in water and plenty of sugar.

How did they taste? Mostly very pleasant with a slight under-taste of pine sap. Sound gross? Yes. It really wasn’t and if you ever run across them, I recommend you try a couple. Even though I did find them pleasant, I’ve a ways to go before I cultivate a craving for the taste of pine sap. They sent a jar home with us, so now I have an 8 ounce, lifetime supply of pine cone preserves.

So what’s your foray into unfamiliar, or, “I’ll never eat that again,” food?