Mystery Solved!!! (comment walls not indexed in site searches)

Ballad Gal
Ballad Gal
@ballad-gal
2 weeks ago
13 posts

Strumelia:

Ballad Gal, as I had thought was possibly happening... because what Greg posted was a COMMENT, it apparently does not get listed within site searches.

That's one very good reason for if:  if you have something that might be important or helpful to ask or answer in a Group, don't just post it in the Comment Wall.  It'll be impossible to find after a year or so as it gets buried underneath newer comments.  Instead, please start a new Discussion in the Group with your helpful posts on a subject.  That way, the discussion's title and posts DO get indexed in site searches.

Comments on Comment Walls are intended as just passing insignificant chit chat kind of stuff.  Trying to hold a conversation of any importance on a comment wall is a futile exercise... that conversation is 'doomed' to disappear.

Start a discussion thread in a Forum or in a Group and it'll be there nicely indexed soothers can find it in the future!

Hope that helps.  Thanks for the update!

You're Welcome, Strumelia! Good  advice for everyone about not posting on a Comment Wall. I didn't realize that could be done until just now when I looked back at where I found Greg's explanation and saw that there is a place to do it.

Lois Sprengnether Keel
Lois Sprengnether Keel
@lois-sprengnether-keel
2 weeks ago
150 posts

The search feature here can be a bit wonky, turning up a widely scattered approach.  For giggles & grins try a search such as a hunt for Dulcimer U.

Still the site amazes me with the wonderful ways we can go back in time, even discussions from the old Ning network (but that was hit & miss as to what was saved).

Go to the Forums tab to see this: there are 3 tabs there: Discussions; Newest Posts; & My Posts which could shorten your search if you said anything while the discussion was going.

As for the Comment Wall, it's the general comments made in a Group beyond specific discussions that are started there.

Hmmmm.  Just saw Strumelia's explanation & find it's interesting that Search doesn't find Comments. 

Also speaking as somebody who sometimes has to miss for chunks of time, I love the Timeline feature which lets you go back 3 months.

Strumelia
Strumelia
@strumelia
2 weeks ago
1,664 posts

Ballad Gal, as I had thought was possibly happening... because what Greg posted was a COMMENT, it apparently does not get listed within site searches.

That's one very good reason for if:  if you have something that might be important or helpful to ask or answer in a Group, don't just post it in the Comment Wall.  It'll be impossible to find after a year or so as it gets buried underneath newer comments.  Instead, please start a new Discussion in the Group with your helpful posts on a subject.  That way, the discussion's title and posts DO get indexed in site searches.

Comments on Comment Walls are intended as just passing insignificant chit chat kind of stuff.  Trying to hold a conversation of any importance on a comment wall is a futile exercise... that conversation is 'doomed' to disappear.

Start a discussion thread in a Forum or in a Group and it'll be there nicely indexed soothers can find it in the future!

Hope that helps.  Thanks for the update!




--
Site Owner

Those irritated by grain of sand best avoid beach.
-Strumelia proverb c.1990
Ballad Gal
Ballad Gal
@ballad-gal
2 weeks ago
13 posts

About a week ago I posted a topic in the Site Questions forum, as I was having trouble trying to search for an explanation given by Greg Gunner with regard to parallel modes and relative modes. trouble with search

Today I happened upon it! This is what Greg said:

"Modal scales that share the same root note (i.e., D Mixolydian, D Aeolian, D Ionian, and D Dorian) are called Parallel Modes They share the same root note, but do not share all of the same notes.  They do not share a common key signature.  There are three other modes (Phrygian Mode, Lydian Mode, and Locrian Mode), but they are seldom used. 

Modes that share a common key signature and all the same notes are called Relative Modes.  For example, D Ionian, B Aeolian, E Dorian, and A Mixolydian are Relative Modes.  All of these modes consist of the notes found in the D Major Scale (D, E, F#, G, A, B, C#, D).  They would all use a common key signature to indicate which notes are played natural, flat, or sharp.  You will notice, the Relative Modes share the same notes, but in each case they begin with a different root note."

This is where I found it...It was below all of the underlined topics in the Notes & Drone group in a section called Comment Wall and it was in Greg's 2nd comment (9:02 p.m.) about 2/3 way down the page. The whole explanation is good, if anyone would like to read it.

Now I'm wondering how things get into the Comment Wall section if anyone knows. Surely, this was part of a topic. He was responding to a question Glenda had asked which appears at the bottom of the page.