Robin Clark
@robin-clark
7 years ago
352 posts
Good topic!Most of the fast tunes I can cope with (eventually). Many I find need a few "tricks". For example: If there is a fast passage of 8 notes then I may play 3 notes, miss one to reposition my noter, then another 3 etc. On some tunes I use my noter with an overhand style so my index finger runs along the top of the noter but I also stick out my pinky so that becomes a second noter about 3" behind the wooden one and I can rock back onto my pinky to catch those develish fast two or three tone jumps that fast fiddle tunes seem to have! I also "ghost" notes by doing a little noter pause on the way past it.I do practice fast passages, trying to relax and relax and relax until they are fast and clean - trying to play like you would ski - looking ahead for the turns and simply trusting that your feet will adjust for the changes in terrain along the way!I do simplify tunes, and most will play well in a simplified form. But there are a few that so far have resisted all efforts - Devils Dream coming to mind. The long jumps in that tune are integral to the rhythm of the pieceRobin
Randy Adams
@randy-adams
7 years ago
123 posts
Good question Robin. A good thing about having experience playing the tunes is knowing what will sound good in what style, and how it will fit in a particular style.I am just tickled when a tune peaks my interest and I am able to play it.
Robin Thompson
@robin-thompson
7 years ago
872 posts
You gals' thoughts make a lot of sense. I simplified June Apple in the first section of the B part; sometimes I play fast slides in that B part though it can sound a bit frenetic so perhaps is not as pleasing to the ear. ;)June Apple can be heard here:http://ezfolk.com/audio/Robin_Thompson/?song=20159When I posted the topic, I was thinking of tunes such as June Apple and Soldier's Joy --tunes in which one can insert fast slides to try to mimic what a fiddler does with the tunes. It's just not the same on MD as on a fiddle.


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Robin T
one of the Moderators here :)
Keep a song in your heart!
Kendra Ward
@kendra-ward
7 years ago
0 posts
Yes, I agree with Strumelia.But, if there is a fiddle tune that does not work exactly right, all you have to do is drop some of the notes.For example, if there is a string of 8 eighth notes, play the 1st, 3rd, 5th, & 7th notes as quarter notes instead of all the eighth notes. Dropping notes (every other one) works out just fine and sometimes makes things more rhythmic.I hope this makes sense?Dulcerina
Strumelia
@strumelia
7 years ago
1,764 posts
For me, it's any of those notey Irish-y tunes with almost all 16th notes. I try to steer clear of those! lol


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Site Owner

Those irritated by grain of sand best avoid beach.
-Strumelia proverb c.1990
Robin Thompson
@robin-thompson
7 years ago
872 posts
Is there a fiddle tune you like that doesn't translate well to noter-style dulcimer play?


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Robin T
one of the Moderators here :)
Keep a song in your heart!

updated by @robin-thompson: 06/11/15 07:23:58AM