Fans of bagpipe tuning?

Flint Hill
@flint-hill
8 years ago
88 posts
Thanks for the clarification!
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
8 years ago
1,460 posts
Flint - if you have 3 unwound .010s (bass, mid, melody) tuned ddd, that's the Galax setup and tuning, not Bagpipe tuning (which is Ddd with a wound bass string about .020).
Strumelia
@strumelia
8 years ago
1,764 posts
Ron Hanes said:
now if I can just figure out which end of the dulcimer the mouthpiece goes in!!!
Ron I think the mouthpiece goes in the foot end. LOL


--
Site Owner

Those irritated by grain of sand best avoid beach.
-Strumelia proverb c.1990
Strumelia
@strumelia
8 years ago
1,764 posts
No problem- always good to discuss this stuff anyway- who knows who will read it sometime and have an "aHA!!" moment. I'm glad you are understanding all this modal blabber. LOL


--
Site Owner

Those irritated by grain of sand best avoid beach.
-Strumelia proverb c.1990
Flint Hill
@flint-hill
8 years ago
88 posts
It is clear, in fact, and thanks very much. I played through Silent Night in the fashion suggested and understand what you're saying WRT to the role of the 6.5 fret in playing an Ionian scale in a tuning in which a Myxolydian scale starts on the open string. (By sharpening the flatted 7th, I mean.)I was quoting an earlier post in using the word "weird" to describe the Mixolydian and Ionian scales in ddd tuning. I probably should have used quotation marks or avoided the term altogether. I didn't mean to suggest that these weren't true Mixolydian or Ionian scales. Or even that I like or use the 6.5 fret, which so far I don't and haven't. ;)Thanks again for establishing that these are the scale starts for the Mixolydian and Ionian scales in ddd tuning.
Strumelia
@strumelia
8 years ago
1,764 posts
Flint Hill said:
Old Joe Clark sounds OK in D with the scale starting at the zero fret, and it uses the flatted 7th at the sixth fret. Banks of the Ohio works in G with the scale starting at the third fret. It never goes higher than the seventh fret and its notes are confined to the Ionian scale. Neither requires the 6.5 fret. I guess these are weird Myxolydian and strange Ionian, respectively?
Are other scale starts possible using the 6.5 fret?

Flint,Those are not weird, they are examples of two normal mixolydian and ionian tunes. It's the ones that use the 6.5 fret that are 'weird'- trying to play in one mode while starting their scale in another mode position. ;DIf you are tuned ddd and you play a tune that ends on the open string and uses the 6.5 fret, then you are actually playing in ionian mode while playing in mixolydian mode position and tuning.Try playing Silent Night in ddd tuning, in the key of D. Start it with the "Si" in Silent being on the fourth fret. You'll be using the 6.5 fret during the tune, and the tune will end on the open string d. What you've done there is to play in ionian mode while in mixo tuning. You simply moved the tonic note of your ionian scale three steps down from the usual third fret to the open string. But then you needed the 6.5 to still play the tune in ionian. Otherwise you'd be playing in mixolydian mode and you wouldn't have all the notes you'd need for the ionian tune Silent Night.Clear as mud, right? LOL


--
Site Owner

Those irritated by grain of sand best avoid beach.
-Strumelia proverb c.1990
Flint Hill
@flint-hill
8 years ago
88 posts
I'm new to most of this and in fact tuned to to Ddd for the first time just now, so please pardon any dundering. I'm actually tuned ddd with 0.010" strings straight across.Old Joe Clark sounds OK in D with the scale starting at the zero fret, and it uses the flatted 7th at the sixth fret. Banks of the Ohio works in G with the scale starting at the third fret. It never goes higher than the seventh fret and its notes are confined to the Ionian scale. Neither requires the 6.5 fret. I guess these are weird Myxolydian and strange Ionian, respectively?Are other scale starts possible using the 6.5 fret?Hope I got the fret numbers right. I've been making fencepost errors counting frets.
Robin Thompson
@robin-thompson
8 years ago
872 posts
Dave,Yup, that's bagpipe tuning. And, yup, that's a lotta d's. :-)To put my use of bagpipe tuning in context, I am a noter-and-drone player and also a player who prefers not to use a capo. That said, any tune in which a player would want to use lots of drones-- no matter the style of play-- bagpipe tuning may give the best sound for some tunes.Robin


--
Robin T
one of the Moderators here :)
Keep a song in your heart!
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
8 years ago
1,460 posts
Silly program locked up the Save when I tried to add to the above post!The "Sixty-Four Thousand Dollar Questions" about Bagpipe Tuning are: Where do you start the scale? Does it matter? If so Why? If not, Why Not?Do you treat it like a 'strange" Ionian Modal tuning? Or a weird Mixolydian Modal tuning?
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
8 years ago
1,460 posts
I need my glasses just to find my dulcimer, so I've always got my protection handy. I've never had a string snap while tuning.I dunno why Bagpipe tuning isn't very popular. Maybe it's because of the name - folks think it's only good for Scots-Irish tunes!
John Shaw
@john-shaw
8 years ago
66 posts
I use bagpipe tuning occasionally, usually Ddd. It's a great sound - very distinctive and, as Robin says, very versatile. I use a .014 for the middle string on just about all my dulcimers, and have no trouble tuning it as high as d (on a 27 - 28" scale length).
Robin Thompson
@robin-thompson
8 years ago
872 posts
Ken, yup, that's an easy way to get to bagpipe from DAd and good advice. Would you caution one to wear eye protection when tuning that middle string up to d? (I'm thinking that if somebody's got a .012-.014 in the middle, the string might break. . .)For what it's worth, I've played bagpipe tuning as low as Aaa and as high as Ddd.


--
Robin T
one of the Moderators here :)
Keep a song in your heart!
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
8 years ago
1,460 posts
The easy bagpipe tuning from DAd is to tune your middle string A up to the d of your melody string. Now you've got Ddd. Bagpipe is a 1-8-8 tuning.
Rod Westerfield
@rod-westerfield
8 years ago
141 posts
I did a class with Linda Brockinton... years ago just me and her so we tuned to bagpipe and did several songs... it's a neat tuning...
Robin Thompson
@robin-thompson
8 years ago
872 posts
Hi, Ron!In bagpipe tuning, all strings are tuned to the same note with the bass string tuned an octave lower than the other strings. It's a wonderful-sounding tuning!If you give it a try, I'd be curious as to what you think of the tuning.Robin


--
Robin T
one of the Moderators here :)
Keep a song in your heart!
Robin Thompson
@robin-thompson
8 years ago
872 posts
Ken, I'm a big fan of bagpipe tuning. . . Have wondered why it seems not to be as popular as I feel it ought be :-)


--
Robin T
one of the Moderators here :)
Keep a song in your heart!
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
8 years ago
1,460 posts
I tune and play bagpipe tuning once in awhile, as a sort of homage to Galax tuning. I don't have a dulcimer set up for the all-thin-strings of Galax, but bagpipe tuning come close to that sound.
Robin Thompson
@robin-thompson
8 years ago
872 posts
Any other fans of bagpipe tuning out there? On my dulcimers that have a 6.5 fret, it is an especially versatile tuning. (How nice it is to play in two keys without re-tuning between tunes. Also, key changes within a tune such as "Flop-Eared Mule" can be played, too.) And the sound of noting melody high on the fingerboard and hearing drones in the 2 octaves below is quite pleasing.Robin


--
Robin T
one of the Moderators here :)
Keep a song in your heart!

updated by @robin-thompson: 06/11/15 07:21:43AM