Forum Activity for @b-ross-ashley

B. Ross Ashley
@b-ross-ashley
05/04/10 11:54:38PM
50 posts

Favorite tuners?


General mountain dulcimer or music discussions

I really really like my little Profile PT-2700 . Just works. Can work in either clip or microphone mode, and is adjustable in what it considers an A, but it's really simple to use.
B. Ross Ashley
@b-ross-ashley
08/28/09 11:50:09PM
50 posts

Favorite tuners?


General mountain dulcimer or music discussions

I'm using a Profile PT-2700; works fine for me. It has variable pitch, although I keep it at A4=440. It has a piezo sensor and a built-in mike, both pretty good; and clips on to the tuning head or a peg head, just fine. Invaluable to a newbie experimenting with all the different tunings available.
B. Ross Ashley
@b-ross-ashley
11/24/09 02:18:32PM
50 posts



Not all of us Northerners are Yanks, thankee. ::grin::And there's a reason the most sought-after busking locations in TO are inside the subway stations! Carson Turner said:
Of course, for all you "northerners" (aka "Yankees"); it's gonna get cold out there - you should move down here to the beach.
B. Ross Ashley
@b-ross-ashley
11/15/09 11:38:06AM
50 posts



Oh, sure, Andy. My buddy Jason who plays the subway stations here does jazz improv in the style of the late, great Canadian guitar player Lenny Breau. Nobody would ever have wanted to hear Lenny sing either. Andy Huffman said:
Does anyone play strictly instrumentals when busking? This is something I would love to do when I get good enough but I am afraid my singing will never um, actually be singing. I'd rather just let the instrument talk for me.
Glad you called my attention back to this thread, actually, there is a great little routine that Long John Baldry used to do about busking in London ... Don't Try to Lay no Boogie-Woogie on the King of Rock and Roll .
B. Ross Ashley
@b-ross-ashley
08/29/09 12:11:37AM
50 posts



I'd have to get a permit to do that on the sidewalk in Toronto; I've played in the parks, but not got any money. The Toronto Transit Commission issues special licences to musicians good enough to play in the subway stations. They have an annual public audition at the Canadian National Exposition, our national "County Fair". Some of the best guitarists and harp and erhu players I've ever heard play Eglinton Station, a block from my apartment! I'd never get in.
B. Ross Ashley
@b-ross-ashley
11/25/09 02:00:02PM
50 posts

STINKAROO advice...


General mountain dulcimer or music discussions

If mine didn't have a 6+ I would not have one, it's just a speed bump for me. Re: the bike shop, steel works just fine, always has, always will, so long as it isn't gaspipe. I just hope the three or four steel mills in the entire world that make bicycle-grade steel tubing continue to do so. Andy Huffman said:
get that pesky 6 1/2 fret. Arrrrgh... I hate the pesky 6 1/2 fret. Always in the way and I never use it.

Oh, and bike shops... and anyone else who tells me something that has worked for 100 years no longer works. One of my friends the other day was upset because he heard my tv was from 1997. When asked why I still had it I said, "it hasn't broke yet."

so instead I go with If it ain't broke don't fix it and question anyone who says otherwise. Oh, and never trust any enterprise that requires new clothes.
B. Ross Ashley
@b-ross-ashley
08/28/09 11:35:10PM
50 posts

Dulcimer or Guitar?


General mountain dulcimer or music discussions

I'd have to agree with Ken and Carson, here, Cynthia; with the additional remark that there are three different instruments called "dulcimer", and while the bowed and the mountain dulcimers are related, the hammered dulcimer is really quite different.All the different soundbox shapes of mountain dulcimer just sort of evolved from the original zitters that drifted south from the German settlements in Pennsylvania, as local woodworkers experimented with hardwoods and fret placement and numbers of strings to produce an inexpensive instrument for everything from church hymn singing to dances. You'll even see what some people call the "Tennessee music box" style from the Tennessee Valley area, with the tuning pegs on the player's right instead of on the left. Ours is really a "folk" instrument with nothing standard about it and no single inventor or virtuoso maker - we have not yet seen, I don't think, an Antonio Stradivari of the MD.As for picking one out for yourself: Make sure you can handle the instrument before you buy, if at all possible. Look to make sure the fretboard is straight, not bent or bowed.Try the strings, making sure that the note on the 7 fret is right on an octave above the open string. Strum it and see whether or not you like the tone. Traditionally it isn't supposed to sound big and mellow like a guitar, but high and silvery; your mileage may vary. Depending on the speed of your Internet connection, look for Bing Futch and other dulcimer players on Youtube and you will get some idea what a well-tuned instrument can sound like ... for a real surprise, look for "pinball dulcimers" there!
B. Ross Ashley
@b-ross-ashley
08/20/09 08:35:26PM
50 posts



Yeah, for years my voice and the ocarinas were good enough for me. Ocs range from the cheap and barely playable to the lovely big doubles I've seen online but never had a chance to play. But the ones I can afford are just barely good enough to play around people, in for example a jug band.The MD is giving me a chance to get good enough at something to perform in a concert if I get called on to accompany my choir.
B. Ross Ashley
@b-ross-ashley
11/15/09 11:58:03AM
50 posts

How did you first discover the mountain dulcimer?


General mountain dulcimer or music discussions

I can't believe I never replied to this thread ... I first heard the mountain dulcimer as a kid in a 4th grade music appreciation class at school in deLand, FL, we would file into the band room where the acoustics were good and listen to recordings. One of them was a John Jacob Niles 78 of music from the hills, accompanying himself on one of his own dulcimers. Years later, in University, I heard Richard Farina, again on record. Over the years since I have heard various other players, from Joni Mitchell to Jean Ritchie. Finallly this last spring I was just browsing musical instruments on eBay and found my 1989 cherry Folkcraft teardrop, a steal at $50 plus shipping. I have really taken to it.
B. Ross Ashley
@b-ross-ashley
08/05/09 05:28:29PM
50 posts

Where's your favorite place to play?


General mountain dulcimer or music discussions

So far, I play in the living room, with Sandie and the cats listening. Haven't alienated any of them yet so I must be doing something right.This Sunday I will try playing in the park, at my choir's annual picnic/song circle/jam. Just some accompaniment noodling around unless somebody wants a solo ...
 
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