Tinwhistle / penny whistles

BethH
BethH
@beth-hansen
12 years ago
41 posts

I have a pair of tin whistles that I never learned to play. I think I picked up a flute at about the same time and I was concentrating on that for a summer. I still have the Clarke cassette tape, and the book must be around here somewhere, but I never see them both at the same time. 

I always put the whistles out for anyone to play when I have a music party, and my friend Stephanie always picks one up and starts with it. She can't practice at home because it drives her beloved bulldog, Mabel, totally nuts.

Perhaps I should just put in the cassette and grab one of the whistles and start playing.

Cindy Smith
Cindy Smith
@cindy-smith
12 years ago
6 posts
I've played the tinwhistle for many years now and have a lot of them: Clarkes, Susatos, Waltons, etc. My favorite are my C and D Michael Burkes. I play old-time and a little Celtic with a banjo player who also plays guitar, dulcimer, and fiddle and sings. I play dulcimer, fiddle a bit, sing, play whistle, and am now learning hammered dulcimer. The whistle is really fun and goes so well with old-time.
Bill Davenport
Bill Davenport
@bill-davenport
12 years ago
74 posts

Hi Kat....yup... great instrument to play with the dulicmer as I tune it DAD. It is diatonic so It is really pretty with a lot of the tunes we play. My favorites are Whiskey Before Breakfast, Rosin the Beau, Simple Gifts to name a few. I have a Michael Burke Session D that I love. But I still love my Clarke Sweetone D.

Kat Johnson said:



I play NAF, but never thought of the tinwhistle, until I saw this YouTube video:

I fell in love! I just Googled up the Clarke Sweetone, and whooo- hooo- what a great price. Guess I gotta go back on line and get one. The sound is so complimentary to the dulcimer. I assume it is diatonic? I have a very hard time matching up my pentatonic NAF's to my dulcies...so far.



Allen Blair
Allen Blair
@allen-blair
12 years ago
4 posts

Hey Bill, did you ever get that class together for playing whistle using dulcimer tab? Sounded like a really neat idea ... and one our dulcimer group here in Mt. Sterling/Winchester might like.

 

Bill Davenport
Bill Davenport
@bill-davenport
12 years ago
74 posts

OK, it's obvious that you not only play dulcimer, but that you also play tinwhistle.

So what songs do you like to play when dulcimer players play a song and you join in with your whistle?

Me...

Whiskey Before Breakfast

Rosin the Beau

Simple Gifts

Over the Waterfall

What songs do you think I need to learn?

Bill Davenport
Bill Davenport
@bill-davenport
12 years ago
74 posts

Hi Val

Thanks for your input.

Why not Feadog's? Aren't they made in Ireland

My Generations just don't sound as good as my Sweetone. I have a Feadog and it is pretty good, but still not quite like my Sweetone D. I know all whistles have to be played for awhile for you to get the great sound.

Glad your sons also play whistle.

Had a great Christmas with my son when he came home. I recently purchased a mandolin and got to play with him and his guitar. It was great to play with him for the short time he was home.

You make me want to go back to my Generations and give them another try.

Thanks for your input.

Bill



Val Hughes said:


Generation is the whistle of my choise and has been since I was a young lad, having played various types I always go back to the generation. My two youngest sons play generations too.


Bill Davenport
Bill Davenport
@bill-davenport
12 years ago
74 posts

Hi Keltia

Love your videos. Need to see you play a whistle. I too like my Feadog, but have you ever tried Generations, or Clarkes?

Keltia said:


My tin whistle is also aFeadog (D) & I learn celtic/trad. songs with it.


Bill Davenport
Bill Davenport
@bill-davenport
12 years ago
74 posts

I agree that there is something about the sound of a cheap whistle. I've always read that you have to go through a lot of Generations to find one good one. I have a Feadog D that is pretty good. Generation brass and nickle, Walton. But I've purchased a many of Clarke Sweetone D andthey are always"spot on" Just love the sound of these.

Love the Michael Burke Session D, but it ain't a cheap whistle. But man does it sing. It was present I bought for myself and does it have an unreal sound.

Always wanted to know about the Bb whistles Carson. Can you fill me in on these?

Carson Turner said:


My whistles are Feadog (D), Generation (Bb, C, D, G), Clarke (C, D), Oak (D), and a wooden Adler in D. I tend to prefer the Generation whistles personally though the Adler has a really nice tone quality that is between a whistle and a recorder. I've considered a Low D but I have an antique "nach Meyer" 5 key wooden flute in D that is a decent sub for that purpose.

I think there's a certain folk music aesthetic that comes with those "cheap" whistles that you just don't get with some of the high-dollar whistles. I like the 'not exactly in perfect tune' timbre that comes with the likes of the Clarke and Generation whistles. Then again, I also like bagpipes and musette tuned concertina. Grin.gif

If you like whistles, Native American Style Flute (NAF) is a pretty fun instrument too and being pentatonic is really nice for just blowing some improv.


Sam
Sam
@sam
13 years ago
167 posts
... mmmmm .... dunno ... when I was working the holes with a needle file it didn't take much change in the fingering holes to make a significant difference in tone and that was with the same fipple. By no means an authority. Only made one.


--
The Dulcimer. If you want to preserve it, jam it!
Bill Davenport
Bill Davenport
@bill-davenport
13 years ago
74 posts

Hi Sam

I've read a lot about whistle building on Chiff and Fipple. Never tried it my self, but I think the tubing and holes is the easy part. It's the fipple that seems to make the difference to me. I've heard that the fipple on the Clarke Sweetone was designed by Michael Copeland. I think that is what makes the difference. Try any cheap whistle and then try a Clarke Sweetone... Wow, what a sound.

Sam said:


Some years back I did an online search for musical instruments that were easy to play. The pennywhistle was at the top of the list... so ... I downloaded plans to construct one from copper tubing. I was very careful with the holes. I made them small then filed them by hand to get them just right. This made a beautiful pennywhistle that has only gotten prettier with age. It has developed that copper 'patina' and is really lovely ... never did learn to play the durn thing.


Bill Lewis
Bill Lewis
@bill-lewis
13 years ago
48 posts
LOL
Sam
Sam
@sam
13 years ago
167 posts
Some years back I did an online search for musical instruments that were easy to play. The pennywhistle was at the top of the list... so ... I downloaded plans to construct one from copper tubing. I was very careful with the holes. I made them small then filed them by hand to get them just right. This made a beautiful pennywhistle that has only gotten prettier with age. It has developed that copper 'patina' and is really lovely ... never did learn to play the durn thing.


--
The Dulcimer. If you want to preserve it, jam it!
Bill Davenport
Bill Davenport
@bill-davenport
13 years ago
74 posts

How many of you also play tinwhistle or sometimes called pennywhistle?

This instrument goes great with a lot of songsthat we play with our dulcimers.

Rosin the Beau, Whiskey Before Breakfast, Simple Gifts to name of few.

What kinddo you play?

I a lot of the "cheap" whistles as well as a Michael Burke.

My favorite is the Clarke Sweetone in D.


updated by @bill-davenport: 10/27/19 12:02:25PM
 
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