Forum Activity for @brian-g

Brian G.
@brian-g
05/08/20 11:37:14PM
99 posts

Is the strumhollow redundant?


Instruments- discuss specific features, luthiers, instrument problems & questions

I'd like to respectfully disagree with Dusty on one minor (yet still important, in my opinion) point.  While I certainly agree that one should not be "going so deep into the strings that you hit the fretboard" I do not agree that you should be "gliding along the top."  That depends on the tone you desire.  For the fullest tone, the dominant direction of the pick (or finger) should actually be *into* the fretboard (without going so deep as to hit the fretboard), rather than across the strings parallel to the plane of the top of the fretboard.  This is easier for many people to do with their fingers than with picks, and when playing individual notes or chord-melody style vs when strumming, but angling the pick as Dusty suggests actually helps facilitate this "down toward the fretboard" angle.

As always, these are *choices* available to the deliberate player.  Try adjusting the angle of your pick, sure, but also try adjusting the direction of your picking (towards the fretboard vs. parallel to the fretboard plane) and see what gives you the sound you want for the piece you're playing.  There's no "one size fits all."

Just my two cents.  :)

Kind regards,

Brian

Brian G.
@brian-g
03/07/20 06:07:34AM
99 posts

Where to Purchase Tablature Music for the Dulcimer


Dulcimer Resources:TABS/Books/websites/DVDs

Hi AngelinaCat,

Others have already mentioned that there are many sources of free tab available online, but I want to point out that you don't have to look specifically for dulcimer tab.  There are even more sources of free midi files, abc files, and other types that can easily be converted to tab with the right software, and some of that software is free or low cost also.  Tabledit and Noteworthy Composer are two that come to mind, but there are others.

Also, regarding Farewell Angelina specifically - that tune is part of a much larger and older tune family (Dylan used to use old folksongs as the basis for his work.) You'll be able to find many versions available if you search for some of the older names for the tune he used, such as "Farewell to Tarwathie," "Rye Whiskey" or "Jack of Diamonds", for example.  Here are three freely available versions for you:

Farewell to Tarwathie

Farewell to Tarwathie

Farewell to Tarwathie  

Enjoy!  :)

Brian G.
@brian-g
01/13/20 07:04:08PM
99 posts

Modern Sheet Music/Tab?


Dulcimer Resources:TABS/Books/websites/DVDs

Gennaro:

I'm also looking for something more contemporary. Bought a 70 song tab book and am only interested in one song.  Cat Stevens' Morning has broken. Won't do that again. Found one fellow teaching Norwegian Wood on stick dulcimer but just a lot of strumming. I must be old to consider a 50 yr old song contemporary, but compared to most I see, it is.



Hi Gennaro,


The melody of Morning Has Broken is actually a traditional Scottish Gaelic tune called Bunessan. (And the lyrics for Morning Has Broken were actually written by Eleanor Farjeon and set to this melody).  You can find the tune here:


Bunessan Tune Page


As for Norwegian Wood, I play an arrangement that is not just strumming. In case it helps you in any way, you can see it here:


Norwegian Wood

Brian G.
@brian-g
01/13/20 05:29:10PM
99 posts

Modern Sheet Music/Tab?


Dulcimer Resources:TABS/Books/websites/DVDs

Hi Geezer,

I would normally suggest getting yourself a software program that can read ABC files (at a minimum) and then using that software to turn those files into tablature. Such software can be found for free, and there are many ABC tune files available for free online.

But if you've been playing classical guitar for 40 years, you can read music, and you can skip the conversion to tab and just look online. There are countless tunes available online for free.  To give one example, you can go to http://abcnotation.com/.  From there you can get to over 600,000 tunes as abc files, sheet music pdfs, MIDI files, etc. It's truly amazing how much is available.

Enjoy your dulcimer. It's a fantastic instrument.  (This is coming from a guy who also studied classical guitar, though I don't play too much anymore, and I haven't played for 40 years.)  :)

 

Brian G.
@brian-g
01/03/19 07:08:17AM
99 posts

Sad News


General mountain dulcimer or music discussions

I'm very sorry to read this...

Brian G.
@brian-g
11/19/18 05:07:04PM
99 posts

Capo for Radius Fretboard?


Instruments- discuss specific features, luthiers, instrument problems & questions

Hi Dana,

Thanks for the quick response!  Yes, a 10" radius fretboard is still pretty flat, so what you've written doesn't surprise me. 

As for the reason for coming up with the idea - there are certainly good reasons for radius fretboards, but like pretty much everything else you can choose to do on an instrument, there are trade-offs also. I mentioned bending earlier, but moving across strings, especially higher up the fretboard, is another example of something that's generally considered easier with flat fretboards.

But it sounds like in this case, at least, any trade-offs were minimal and well worth it. :)  And I certainly can't argue with how that instrument sounds.  Love it!

Brian G.
@brian-g
11/19/18 04:36:44PM
99 posts

Capo for Radius Fretboard?


Instruments- discuss specific features, luthiers, instrument problems & questions


Hi Dana,

I have a couple questions for you, but rather than ask them privately I figured I'd do it here in case anyone else was wondering also.

1) Do you know the radius of your new dulcimer's fretboard in inches?  (and if it's a compound radius fretboard, do you know the radii for each end?)

2) Do you like it (not the dulcimer itself, which sounds fantastic, but the fretboard specifically)?  I'm familiar with the general advantages of curved fretboards (eg, more easy to barre and chord) as well as their disadvantages (eg, can't usually get action as low as with flat boards, more prone to buzzes, especially when bending notes or hammering) and I can understand the desire for curved fretboards on, say, a guitar, because of how they are played. But given the way a dulcimer is played, it doesn't seem to me that it would make much difference for playability.  My guitar playing is mostly limited to classical guitar (those have flat fretboards) so my experience with curved fretboards is limited.

Thanks for any insight.

Brian

 


updated by @brian-g: 11/19/18 04:56:37PM
Brian G.
@brian-g
10/22/18 11:02:49PM
99 posts

Buying a used McSpadden questions


Instruments- discuss specific features, luthiers, instrument problems & questions

I had a conversation with Jim Woods at McSpadden about the move away from plywood years ago.  He told me that the original driving factor was that they were finding it very difficult to get good quality plywood.  It was a custom item and their supplier's quality controls were not working and they would've had to build dulcimers with wood that they would have preferred to not use. Jim told me he fought the issue for several years and finally decided to go to a material they could control.  Making the backs takes more time than cutting them out of the plywood sheets but this way they can at least plan ahead and select wood that will make dulcimers of which they can be proud.

I also know the bracing was changed with the move to solid wood backs and Jim says that there is a difference in the sound (that they are now a bit louder with a stronger bass voice).  Most of their customers have preferred the solid backs, but a few have disagreed. I've listened to and played many McSpaddens with both solid and plywood backs, and I think it comes down to the individual instrument - I've heard fantastic instruments with each type of back.

updated by @brian-g: 10/22/18 11:04:21PM
Brian G.
@brian-g
09/18/18 12:31:51AM
99 posts

What's your favorite mournful, spooky, or lonesome song to play?


General mountain dulcimer or music discussions

Jan Potts:

A similar idea, but no, the one I'm looking for is definitely "October is a Gypsy Lass". I've found it in a couple spots online, but no one ever says who wrote it...either the words or the music.

Hi Jan,

Did you ever find any more info on October is a Gypsy Lass?  I'm very curious about it also. I know it only by these words (and did not know it was even a song - I thought it was "just" a poem):


October is a gypsy lass

Who dances through our town

Scarlet is her flying scarf

Many-hued her gown

On her dusky hair she wears

A crown of bittersweet

Maples spread a golden carpet

For her dancing feet


 

Brian G.
@brian-g
05/27/18 10:58:02PM
99 posts

Everything Dulcimer - Closing Down.


Dulcimer Resources:TABS/Books/websites/DVDs

Hi all,

I'm sorry I hadn't see this thread again until recently, but I am glad Lois and others were able to download the site successfully.  Also glad the tab from ED has found a new home on the web.  :)

Brian G.
@brian-g
04/10/18 07:07:01PM
99 posts

Everything Dulcimer - Closing Down.


Dulcimer Resources:TABS/Books/websites/DVDs

Dusty - it's tough to say because I was at work when the process was finished. I also did not realize that, although I was using a very fast computer I was accidentally connected wirelessly. Therefore, my transfer speeds were very slow, and the time wouldn't really be representative anyway.

I can state, though, that with that slow connection I was averaging about 25 kb/s, and last time I looked I had downloaded 84% of the site in 13h, 20m (using no more than 4 active connections).  A fast wired connection would dramatically reduce that time, and for someone just interested in the tunes, they
total what, a little over 200MB?  That wouldn't take much time at all.


updated by @brian-g: 04/10/18 07:08:25PM
Brian G.
@brian-g
04/10/18 06:37:51PM
99 posts

Everything Dulcimer - Closing Down.


Dulcimer Resources:TABS/Books/websites/DVDs

I promised to post final results, so here's what I have;

Total Website Size: 3.66GB

Number of files: 82,247

Number of Folders: 3,063

 

I know many people are interested in the tunes, specifically, so here's some information on that;

 

Tab PDFs: 1,397 files, 90.7 MB

Tab GIFs: 7 files, 268 KB

Tab JPGs: 15 files, 3.68 MB

Tab Word files: 6 files, 101 KB

Tab RTF Files: 2 files, 8 KB

MIDI files: 694 files, 2.43 MB

MP3s: 107 files, 123 MB

Lyrics Text files: 270 files, 716 KB

Brian G.
@brian-g
04/10/18 06:56:45AM
99 posts

Everything Dulcimer - Closing Down.


Dulcimer Resources:TABS/Books/websites/DVDs

Hi Jim,

I'll post my final results when I'm done, but as of right now, we are at 2.46GB, 69,150 files written, and elapsed time of 13h, 20m (using no more than 4 active connections).  I am using a very fast computer (overclocked i7-7700k CPU, liquid cooled, 32 gigs RAM), but am also using a wireless connection (that was an oversight on my part - my cable for hardwiring my connection is actually plugged into another computer nearby I was testing recently and I didn't notice it until now) so my transfer rate is pretty slow ~25kb/s).

Also, as I mentioned in my initial post (and Nigel also wrote below), this type of software is doing more than simply downloading. It actually parses the HTML files of websites and rebuilds the original site's directory and link structure. The result is that you can then load a page of the mirrored website in your browser and browse the site just as if you were doing it online.

Brian G.
@brian-g
04/09/18 09:31:23PM
99 posts

Everything Dulcimer - Closing Down.


Dulcimer Resources:TABS/Books/websites/DVDs

Hi Irene. Yes, you can choose the output location for the files, so you can specify to an external drive such as a USB thumb drive or an SD card, as long as it's big enough to hold the contents of the site you're trying to "mirror" (ie, copy).

Brian G.
@brian-g
04/09/18 08:34:13PM
99 posts

Everything Dulcimer - Closing Down.


Dulcimer Resources:TABS/Books/websites/DVDs

The Wayback Machine is a great resource, but because our site of interest (ie, EverythingDulcimer.com) still currently exists, there's a better option - use a website copier program to simply download the entire website to your hard drive.

Properly configured, programs like this will rebuild the entire website locally, with all of the tab, mp3s, midis, articles, etc.  This takes a long time to do (as in hours in the case of EverythingDulcimer.com), depending on your internet speed and how "beefy" your computer is, but if you set it up and run it before you go to sleep, or before you head out to work, you may never notice. And it's a whole lot faster/more efficient than going through hundreds of tab files, articles, etc. to decide which ones you might like to keep and then downloading those individually. 

I use HTTrack because it's free and has a pretty good interface (as far as these types of programs are concerned).  But there are others that will also do the job, including WebWhacker, SiteSucker, SurfOffline, Grab-A-Site and more.

Brian G.
@brian-g
12/10/17 12:03:37PM
99 posts

My "New" Folkcraft


General mountain dulcimer or music discussions

Congratulations!  My very first dulcimer was an all-walnut Folkcraft and I loved it. In fact, I regret selling it.

 

Enjoy!

Brian G.
@brian-g
07/25/17 10:11:11PM
99 posts

scalloped fretboard


Instruments- discuss specific features, luthiers, instrument problems & questions

Joe, what is your definition of a "properly constructed instrument" with a scalloped fretboard such that it doesn't warp?  I'm curious as to the construction differences that differentiate it from those instruments whose scalloped fretboards do warp.

Brian G.
@brian-g
07/25/17 12:12:35AM
99 posts

scalloped fretboard


Instruments- discuss specific features, luthiers, instrument problems & questions

I'm going to to disagree with Ken here.  I haven't owned scalloped-fretboard instruments long enough to notice any issues, but I can think of three people I know, very well respected in the dulcimer world, who have been playing instruments with and without scalloped fretboards longer than I've been alive, and it is their opinion that over time, those scalloped fretboards do (and in the case of some builders, WILL) warp. And they each told me that independently, over the years I've known them. In fact, it's not even an opinion; two of them have shown me examples.

Brian G.
@brian-g
07/15/17 06:29:59AM
99 posts

Tune You've Had The Most Fun Playing?


General mountain dulcimer or music discussions

I have a lot of fun with Arkansas Traveler.  It's ridiculously fun to play, in fact - a simple tune you can do so much with.  Great sections for hammer-ons and pull-offs, stumming, cross-picking...it's one of those tunes that can take a lot of abuse and still come out sounding really good. (And it's just fun physically to play.)  It also seems to be one of the first tunes to come out of any new dulcimer I pick up for the first time.  :)

Brian G.
@brian-g
06/15/17 09:03:49PM
99 posts

"What was that bell sound I heard at 5pm yesterday" says you


General mountain dulcimer or music discussions

Dana, I am very happy you are enjoying the instrument.  :)  (I told you it was a good one!)

Brian

Brian G.
@brian-g
05/06/17 09:15:01PM
99 posts

Does size really matter? 28.5 vs 26


Instruments- discuss specific features, luthiers, instrument problems & questions


If using the same gauge strings, those on a dulcimer with a shorter VSL will require less tension to reach a given pitch than one with a longer VSL.  This helps playability not only because frets are closer together making it easier to chord down at the first few frets, but also because bending notes is easier, vibrato is easier, and playing in general is just easier with less string tension. 

But there *are* definitely well-known effects on sound as well. String tension and length affect overtones and harmonics.  The greater the string tension, the greater the higher overtones produced. Longer string lengths also give more space for harmonics and overtones to “breathe” (ie, sound separate).  With shorter scale lengths there is less separation. As a result, longer VSLs will give more brightness, clarity and definition in the tone, while shorter ones will give a “sweeter” sound with more warmth/darkness, less clarity and fewer overtones. Longer VSLs and their increased string tension tend to give you more volume and attack also, and more of that twangy “silvery-ness” traditionally associated with a mountain dulcimer.     

Many guitar builders will tell you that the tone begins with the string and everything else is a modifier; that you start with the scale length and then go from there, choosing woods, body shape, body volume, type of pickup, etc. to get the tone you are looking for.

Incidentally, if you don't want to believe me, there are plenty of well-respected dulcimer builders who have written about scale length and its effect on tone before (Jerry Rockwell and Janita Baker come immediately to mind, for example).


updated by @brian-g: 05/06/17 09:15:32PM
Brian G.
@brian-g
04/24/17 08:42:16AM
99 posts

Roland, MICRO CUBE GX


Instruments- discuss specific features, luthiers, instrument problems & questions

Hi Marg,

I'm unfamiliar with Cube Jam, but I will have to investigate it now.  :)

Brian G.
@brian-g
04/22/17 02:59:15PM
99 posts

Roland, MICRO CUBE GX


Instruments- discuss specific features, luthiers, instrument problems & questions

Hi Marg.  As you know, this amp comes with a few effects and also presets to emulate the sound of some classic guitar amplifiers of the past.  I mostly use it on "acoustic", and with a little chorus and a little reverb.  When used with no effects and on "acoustic", the sound is just that - it just sounds like my dulcimers, only louder.  For what this little thing is (and the price I paid for it), I love it.

Brian G.
@brian-g
04/20/17 08:51:31PM
99 posts

Roland, MICRO CUBE GX


Instruments- discuss specific features, luthiers, instrument problems & questions

I own one of these and use it with my dulcimers. It's a great little amp.

Brian G.
@brian-g
04/20/17 01:36:41PM
99 posts

Untabbed songs/tunes you'd like to learn


General mountain dulcimer or music discussions

I'm working on a beautiful 16th century tune called John Com Kisse Me Now.  I definitely haven't seen any tab for it, so I'm creating my own arrangement based on my favorite version of the tune.

Brian G.
@brian-g
04/06/17 11:33:04AM
99 posts

Our dear John Henry is on the cover


General mountain dulcimer or music discussions

I know I've written this elsewhere on the internet already, but I wanted to write it here also - congrats John Henry!  Great achievement.

Brian G.
@brian-g
03/24/17 11:31:35PM
99 posts

What Are You Working On?


General mountain dulcimer or music discussions


Jill - I'm so sorry; I did not see your below message to me until now.  I've followed you and also sent you a PM.

As for this thread's topic, I am working on arranging a great 16th-century lute piece called "John Com Kisse Me Now".  It was a well-known song then and it's quite pretty - a series of increasingly difficult variations on what is, at its core, a pretty simple tune.  It's been a bit of a challenge, but I've got about half of it down so far.


updated by @brian-g: 03/25/17 07:03:16AM
Brian G.
@brian-g
03/11/17 06:11:50AM
99 posts

Tunes in the key of A major


General mountain dulcimer or music discussions


I'm also going to plug EAA tuning here.  I tend to be lazy and either play an A tune out of DAD if I can, or capo to 4, but the truth is, I hate capos at fret 4 for a number of reasons (two big ones - you lose about a third of your instrument, and the vsl becomes so short that the instruments generally don't sound very good to me) and much prefer EAA as it has a number of advantages:

  • built in A major and A mixolydian scales
  • plays an octave under fiddle, mandolin and capo'd dulcimers
  • the lower A sounds better to me for many tunes
  • it avoids the heavy boominess and reverbing bass drone string on baritone dulcimers and is much better balanced to my ears

I also want to respond specifically to Dusy's comment about it being better for drone players since chord players will need to learn all new fingerings - there is a "secret" (not really) that makes this very easy.

EAA tuning can be thought of as a kind of "reverse DAD" tuning in which you reverse what you would do on the middle and bass strings.  For example - in DAD, if a note falls below the pitch of the melody string, you can normally get it on the middle string. In EAA, if the note falls below the pitch of the melody string, you play it on the bass string.  So if the IV chord in DAD is played 0-1-3 (bass to melody string), in EAA it would be played 1-0-3 (bass to melody string).

UPDATED to give credit to Rich Carty, who was the first person to have the above discussion with me and made me aware of the possibilities of EAA tuning.  I don't play in it very often, but when I do, I absolutely love it.


updated by @brian-g: 03/11/17 09:28:59AM
Brian G.
@brian-g
02/07/17 08:57:39PM
99 posts

What Are You Working On?


General mountain dulcimer or music discussions

I'm working on adapting John Com Kisse Me Now to the dulcimer. This is a fantastic 16th century tune - you can hear it played by the world's greatest lutenist (in my opinion, of course, and this would be Paul O'Dettte) here:

Also, I saw Dusty and jenniferc were both working on Harvest Home.  I love that tune also and had recorded a video of it a few years ago. In case anyone would like to see, it's here:

And Dana - when do we get to hear your For Ireland?  I happen to know it sounds excellent.  ;)

 

Brian G.
@brian-g
01/05/17 09:56:11AM
99 posts

What Are You Working On?


General mountain dulcimer or music discussions


Hi All,

I just wanted to chime in and mention that Nonesuch is still available in various places around the internet, but perhaps the easiest way to hear it is via YouTube. A YouTube search for "Nonesuch for Dulcimer (1972)" will bring it up as of this writing.  There are also a number of browser extensions and other programs that will allow you to save YouTube video or audio.

 

And in case people aren't aware of this, YouTube searches that include the words "full album" bring up many gems, especially in the world of folk music.

 

 


updated by @brian-g: 01/05/17 10:10:20AM
Brian G.
@brian-g
11/29/16 01:45:14PM
99 posts

Remember Our Friend Oliver Ogden.


OFF TOPIC discussions

I am very sorry to read of Oliver's passing.  He and his family will be in my thoughts, and I think I'll go play a tune in his honor...

Brian G.
@brian-g
11/17/16 05:52:42PM
99 posts

Offering sympathy to our dear John Henry


OFF TOPIC discussions

I am so sorry to read this news.  My deepest condolences to you, John and Paul.   You are in my thoughts.

Brian G.
@brian-g
11/10/16 07:34:39AM
99 posts

Tab for Leonard Cohen's song, Hallelujah


Dulcimer Resources:TABS/Books/websites/DVDs

Thanks Marc and Dusty.  It's a fun tune to play.  :)

Brian G.
@brian-g
11/09/16 06:17:53PM
99 posts

Tab for Leonard Cohen's song, Hallelujah


Dulcimer Resources:TABS/Books/websites/DVDs

In case anyone would like to hear another dulcimer version, here's one I did a couple years ago.  This is not a chromatic dulcimer either.  :)

Hallelujah (Leonard Cohen cover)

Brian G.
@brian-g
09/01/16 03:53:04PM
99 posts

Determining string gauge


Instruments- discuss specific features, luthiers, instrument problems & questions

I also trim the string before I put it on, leaving about 2 inches past the tuner.  A few of my dulcimers have self-trimming tuners (they have built in cutters and trim the string as you are replacing it), and they are absolutely excellent. I think they are D'Addario Planet Waves, but I am not 100% sure.  But I went from being skeptical of them to a firm believer pretty much immediately:

D'Addario Planet Wave Tuners

Brian G.
@brian-g
08/30/16 03:28:54PM
99 posts

Determining string gauge


Instruments- discuss specific features, luthiers, instrument problems & questions

Jennifer - yes, you can definitely just measure the string with a caliper to determine its gauge.  As has been mentioned, there's nothing special about dulcimer strings; a regular old caliper or micrometer will work on a dulcimer string just as well as it will any other string. I had to do this recently for a harp dulcimer I acquired as I had no idea what gauges the harp strings were.  :) 

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