Forum Activity for @dusty-turtle

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
06/17/19 07:19:22PM
1,105 posts

Ray Branson Dulcimer 1987


Instruments- discuss specific features, luthiers, instrument problems & questions

Hi @retomas.  It sounds like you have a really nice instrument there.  I would be surprised if no one around this site has any information for you.

FYI: I moved your post from the Site Questions Forum, which is for questions about how to use the site itself, to a Forum on specific instruments and specific luthiers.  That way your discussion will be easier to find.

And it shouldn't be hard just to reduce the size of your photos before posting. The free editing software that comes with most PCs or even most phones should be able to do that easily.  


updated by @dusty-turtle: 06/17/19 09:26:41PM
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
06/15/19 03:21:39PM
1,105 posts

What's fer dinner?


OFF TOPIC discussions

@Ken-Hulme, someone served me a jackfruit curry recently. It was quite tasty, but I had no idea what it was. I looked it up afterward and have to admit that I'd have no idea how to cut up and prepare that strange thing.  I'll be happy to eat your BB pulled jackfruit, though, so you can expect me for dinner!

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
06/13/19 06:46:26PM
1,105 posts

Healthy Living- healthy eating, exercise, weight loss, veggie gardening, etc.


OFF TOPIC discussions

Good for you, Andreas.  I'm sure somewhere between being a sports junkie and not moving for 15 years there is a happy medium and a healthy lifestyle.

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
06/06/19 10:41:41AM
1,105 posts

Healthy Living- healthy eating, exercise, weight loss, veggie gardening, etc.


OFF TOPIC discussions

Good for you, @Andreas-Fischer, for getting the new bike.  Don't overdo it too fast, though.  You might want to start out doing 3 km a day for a while, and then slowly increasing your distance.  I applaud your enthusiasm, but none of us would want to see you injure yourself.

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
06/04/19 11:51:59AM
1,105 posts

Healthy Living- healthy eating, exercise, weight loss, veggie gardening, etc.


OFF TOPIC discussions

Those radishes look delicious, but I'd prefer the roots to the greens.

I don't grow them myself, but this time of year I eat a LOT of fresh English peas.  I think last year (and maybe the year before that) I posted a picture of a big pile of them.  One of the local supermarkets doesn't even put them out for the public.  They sell them only to a small handful of us who buy their whole stock. By mid-summer they won't be fresh anymore, so there is only about a month when I can indulge.

And I don't do anything with them. I used to make a pasta sauce with them, but they are just so delicious fresh and raw that now I just eat 'em.  Shell 'em and eat 'em like popcorn.  Mmm. 

And I don't think it's evil to add butter to the greens. I cook chard sometimes with apple cider and bacon.  Check out the work of Samin Nosrat (Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat).  She explains clearly how fat functions as a purveyor of flavor.  If you heat up some garlic in water, the water will smell mildly of garlic, but if you cook something in that water, it will not pick up much garlic flavor. However, if you cook that garlic in olive oil or butter, those fats become infused with garlic and will pass on that garlic to whatever you cook in the them.  

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
06/02/19 02:09:57PM
1,105 posts

Sarah Kate Morgan live!


Single-Instructor workshops, band & house concerts, Club activities, monthly Jams

Thank, @Dan. I'm listening to Sarah on that show right now!

I should let you know that I moved this discussion to the section on single instructor workshops and concerts, which is where we try to keep these kinds of announcements.

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
05/30/19 06:51:07PM
1,105 posts

RIP Leon Redbone


OFF TOPIC discussions

What a cool title for a ukulele songbook!  And thanks for sharing "Shine On."

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
05/30/19 01:19:51PM
1,105 posts

RIP Leon Redbone


OFF TOPIC discussions

One of my musical influences died today.  Leon Redbone died this morning at the age of 69. In the mid-1970s he attained a degree of commercial success, appearing often on Saturday Night Live and late night talk shows and even had a couple of commercials. (Yes, he floated through the air singing "This Bud's for you.")  His mustache, fedora, sunglasses, and deadpan singing style seemed to capture something genuine about the music from the 20s and 30s that he played in a fingerpicking style on his acoustic guitar.  He was my initial conduit to the world of acoustic blues guitarists like Blind Lemon Jefferson and the Tin Pan Alley standards from the early 20th century. At one time I could sing every word of the tunes he released on the album On the Track.  Leon was so hip he made "Polly Wolly Doodle" a cool tune during the dark days of big collars on polyester suits and disco ruling the radio.

Please honor Leon by checking out some of his tunes on YouTube or Pandora or iTunes or wherever you prefer to listen.

Here, appropriately, is Leon playing "Please Don't Talk About Me When I'm Gone."

On the Lean Redbone website, a statement was posted today that Leon must have written himself:

It is with heavy hearts we announce that early this morning, May 30th, 2019, Leon Redbone crossed the delta for that beautiful shore at the age of 127.  He departed our world with his guitar, his trusty companion Rover, and a simple tip of his hat.  He’s interested to see what Blind Blake, Emmett, and Jelly Roll have been up to in his absence, and has plans for a rousing sing along number with Sári Barabás.  An eternity of pouring through texts in the Library of Ashurbanipal will be a welcome repose, perhaps followed by a shot or two of whiskey with Lee Morse, and some long overdue discussions with his favorite Uncle, Suppiluliuma I of the Hittites.  To his fans, friends, and loving family who have already been missing him so in this realm he says, “Oh behave yourselves.  Thank you … and good evening everybody.”

 


updated by @dusty-turtle: 05/30/19 01:34:08PM
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
05/25/19 03:10:47PM
1,105 posts

Forming a dulcimer club


General mountain dulcimer or music discussions

Hi @Bill-s. I started a dulcimer group that has been going for about 7 years now, so I guess it's a success.  We meet monthly and only cancel meetings around the holidays when life gets hectic for all of us.

Here in Northern California, no one would hesitate to drive an hour for a dulcimer meeting, and I have some regular members who drive 2 to 2-1/2 hours to join us. Hopefully where you are in Michigan dulcimer players are a bit more common than they are here.

I started with perhaps 3 or 4 email addresses, but one of them was a woman willing for us to use her home, so that was a start.  Initially, I actively recruited people, meaning I scoured the lists of members here at FOTMD and at the defunct Everything Dulcimer website and contacted anyone within a 3-hour drive, urging them to join us.  A few months later I created a website, making sure to put certain key words on the home page (words like "dulcimer,"  "beginner," and the state, and any prominent cities in the area).  Those key words help search engines find your site, so if someone does a search for "dulcimer clubs in Michigan" or "dulcimer clubs in Flint" you want your website to pop up.  I still average about one contact per month through the website.

The trick for me was creating a structure that was interesting for both beginners and more advanced players.  What I settled on is a three-part structure.  The first hour is a free beginner lesson.  I think this is essential if you want to welcome new players or people who played a little years ago and have put the instrument down.  I tailor the beginner lesson to whoever is the "most beginnerest." So if someone has never played before, we start with the parts of the dulcimer, how to position the dulcimer on your lap, how to strum steadily, and most importantly, how to read tablature.  If no true beginners show up, I ask whoever is there what they'd like to work on, so that first hour is a free lesson for whoever shows up.

After the first hour is group play of our common tunes.  At our first meeting I brought a good beginner tune as did another member, and we also solicited ideas from others about what tunes to play.  Over time, the list of the tunes we are actively playing has evolved, but most of our group play is pretty steady.  When we first start our group play each month, I ask the other members to help me choose tunes that would be more accessible to the newbies, so that they don't get too intimidated.

The third hour is a song circle in which we take turns playing a song solo, calling out a tune for group play, or just "passing" and watching others.  This part of our gathering was requested by the beginners who wanted to hear what the rest of us were playing when we weren't playing with them. But it has also been important for more advanced players who use it as a kind of dress rehearsal for songs they are working on that might not be ready for prime time yet.  To be honest we don't always devote a whole hour to this part of our gathering, if only because our common repertoire has grown, and if we're having fun playing together, I don't want to cut us off. But I usually make time to ask if anyone has a song they would like to play for the group.  Some never do, but others are happy to share tunes they are proud of but haven't quite mastered yet.

After we had been meeting for about a year, I got a call from a music store (it's actually a ukulele mecca of sorts) wondering if we would like to meet there instead.  I hesitated at first, thinking most of us liked being out of the public eye in a private home.  But I had also grown concerned about giving out a private address to anyone who contacted me saying they wanted to join.  In the end, meeting at The Strum Shop has helped us immeasurably.  If someone breaks a string or if their instrument needs some repair, it can be handled right there on the spot.  And the exposure has also brought us new members.  If you can find an arrangement like that, I highly recommend it. 

Our gatherings have ranged from a low of 6 to a high of 22 or so, and I consider that a huge success.  And although we meet just north of Sacramento, we have one member who drives a couple of hours from Reno, another who drives that distance from San Jose, and another who makes a similar drive from Marin County north of San Francisco.  It takes dedication not only on the part of the organizer, but also on the part of the participants.  I think the biggest challenges were getting the word out and developing a structure that works for beginners and advanced players alike.  It takes some effort, so I can't tell you if it would be worth it or if you should just drive the hour to the existing group, but hopefully I've given you some ideas about how to get started if you wish.

 

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
05/21/19 11:16:14AM
1,105 posts

Buying in Europe


Instruments- discuss specific features, luthiers, instrument problems & questions

Congratulations on your dulcimer purchase.  I hope you know that Martin is also a member here.

And even though I am in the US, when I started playing I also relied on videos by Bing Futch and others.

 

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
05/20/19 12:47:13AM
1,105 posts

Bear Meadow dulcimers


Instruments- discuss specific features, luthiers, instrument problems & questions

Garret, I don't own a Bear Meadow dulcimer, but I have two friends who have them and swear by them.  One actually owns two.  Their action rivals that of any other high-end dulcimers.  Their volume is not as great as the other really LOUD dulcimers out there (I have three that are probably louder: Modern Mountain Dulcimer, Rick Probst, and Terry McCafferty) but the Bear Meadows have a tonal balance that puts all the others to shame.  Most dulcimers tend to privilege either the high tones or the bass tones, but Bear Meadow dulcimers are just exquisitely balanced.

Dwain has posted some sound samples on the website.  Give them a listen.

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
05/12/19 01:28:31PM
1,105 posts

Tab for "There is a Time" by the Dillards


Dulcimer Resources:TABS/Books/websites/DVDs

@Susie, since the song was written a few decades ago, it is still under copyright, so I don't want to distribute the tablature I wrote, which was a specific request by an individual who used to take lessons from me before her mother's health required more intense caretaking. 

I can explain that I arranged the tune in Bm out of a DAd tuning. There are only three chords involved: Bm, D, and A.  The melody begins and ends on the first fret of the middle string.  So the notes for "There is" are found on the first fret of the middle string, then "a" then moves to the open melody string, and "time" is found on the second fret of the melody string.  The entire melody is found between the first fret of the middle string and the fifth fret of the melody string.

If you play chords and prefer DAA, the song could also work in Bm, and the melody would fall between the first and eighth frets of the melody string.  But that would not work in in a drone style because the wrong notes would be droning.  In a drone style you would want to switch keys and tune DAC or DAG perhaps.

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
05/11/19 06:08:40PM
1,105 posts

Tab for "There is a Time" by the Dillards


Dulcimer Resources:TABS/Books/websites/DVDs

Just playing the melody strings is not problem at all.  It's the traditional way of player the dulcimer. I was just asking to see what kind of tab you were looking for. I had tabbed out the melody, as I said, in Bm out of a DAd tuning, but I made use of the middle string. You would want another tuning to stick to the melody string.

 


updated by @dusty-turtle: 06/15/19 12:30:34PM
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
05/10/19 04:57:27PM
1,105 posts

Tab for "There is a Time" by the Dillards


Dulcimer Resources:TABS/Books/websites/DVDs

@michael-willey, a student of mine requested that tune a while back but she quit before I ever finished the tab.  I had started arranging it in Bm in a DAd tuning, but as @stewart-mccormick says, it can be played in DAC as well.  I think you could probably capo at the first fret and play it in Em out of a DAd tuning as another alternative.

Do you fret across all the strings or do you play on the melody string only?  


updated by @dusty-turtle: 05/11/19 11:54:16AM
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
05/03/19 05:16:35PM
1,105 posts

Playing dulcimer with a ukelele


Playing and jamming difficulties...HELP ME!

katiemac225: And now I'm lost again. I can play all those chords u mentioned tuned in DAD. So if it's in a different key, those chords I know are in a different place. And if I use a capo, they're not the same. And that's where it becomes difficult. The idea I get but not the skill to make it happen.

Katie, there is one correction I have to make to a comment below.  In a DAd or DAA tuning on a diatonic dulcimer, you cannot play an F chord.  There is no F natural on the fretboard.  (You can get an F chord if you tune to C (CGG or CGc) and then using the same fingering you are used to for a G chord. More on that below.)  Perhaps this transposition chart will help.


transposition chart for basic keys.jpg

So how to use that chart?  The key issue is the relationship of a note or a chord to the other notes and chords of the same key. In the key of D, D is I chord, G is the IV chord, and A is the V chord.  If you want to play that same song in the key of G, you use the same numbered chords, so whenever you had used a D chord, you now use a G chord, whenever you had used a G chord, you now use a C chord, and whenever you had used an A chord, you use a D chord.  You can also refer to chords by their names as indicated, but I find that unnecessarily confusing.  I put that information on the chart because you will sometimes hear people refer to some of those names.

That chart can also tell you how to use a capo.  If you are tuned DAd, you know that 002 is a D chord, 013 is a G chord, and 101 is an A chord.  If you put the capo at the 3rd fret, you are now in G, but you can use that same fingering, pretending the capo is the nut, and 002 (really 335) is a G chord, 013 (really 346) is a C chord, and 101 (really 434) is an D chord.

I would suggest playing around with a capo by playing a song you know, then putting the capo on the 3rd fret and playing the same song the same way you did before. You will see that everything works the same way but you are now in a higher register and a different key. You can also put the capo at 4 to play in A, though you have to watch out for that 6+ fret.

So with a capo, you can play in the keys of D, G, and A.  To get the key of C, I would suggest tuning down a note to CGc.  Then the same thing applies. If you play 002, you are playing the I chord, meaning C chord, if you play 013 your are playing the IV chord, meaning an F chord, and if you play 101 you are playing the V chord, meaning a G chord.

That's how I would approach playing in the main keys of C, D, G, and A in a multi-instrument jam.

And these same principles can get you funkier keys.  What if a singer comes in and wants to play in F?  You don't have an F on the dulcimer in DAD or DAA, but F is the IV in the key of C, just as G is the IV in the key of D.  When we tuned DAd, we got the key of G by using the capo at the 3rd fret, so we can just tune CGc, put the capo a the 3rd fret, and we are now in the key of F.  In other words, whatever key you are tuned to, you get the IV by capoing at 3 and the V by capoing at 4.

If all of this makes you dizzy, just know that if you know the alphabet from A to G, and you can count to 8, you can figure all of this out yourself.  

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
05/03/19 02:55:58PM
1,105 posts

The Positive Thread...


OFF TOPIC discussions

Had a wonderful time at a house concert last night by the Irish fiddler Gerry O'Connnor.  If you're interested, there are plenty of videos of him on YouTube.  Make sure you search for the right guy, though, someone else by that name plays Irish banjo.  The two have gotten together and recorded "Stereo Connor!" To be that close and intimate with such a world class musician was fantastic.  There were about 20 of us in attendance.  Afterwards I talked to the guitarist, Richard Mandel, who accompanied him, which was very interesting. He was in a DADGAD tuning, which has been standard in Irish sessions since the 1960s or thereabout.  I was interested in some of the chords he used.  He admitted that he often only fretted some of the strings, leaving the others to drone, creating interesting chord tones that he couldn't even identify without thinking about it.  So he was using a lot of D and A drones just as we do on the dulcimer!

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
05/03/19 01:34:41PM
1,105 posts

Playing dulcimer with a ukelele


Playing and jamming difficulties...HELP ME!

@katiemac225, Ken has explained the central issue here.  The ukulele is a chromatic instrument, so it can play in any of the 12 keys.  The dulcimer is a diatonic instrument, so if you are tuned DAA or DAd, it will be very easy to play in D (or Bm), somewhat less easy to play in G or A, and very difficult or even impossible to play in other keys.

What does this mean in practice? I would suggest two approaches for you.

First, you might find out ahead of time what tunes the ukulele group plays.  Most groups use a songbook.  Get a copy of that book and look through it.  Find the tunes in the key of D and expect to play along with those, skipping the rest (for now).  [You can play in C if you retune to CGc or CGG, and out of your D tuning you can use a capo at 3 to play in G or at 4 to play in A.  So you can start to add the tunes in those keys as you get comfortable.]

Second, you might approach one or two of the friendlier, patient people from the ukulele group and ask if they would play with you.  It will be easier to ask one or two people to play only in D than it would be to get the whole group to change their routine.  As you get comfortable playing with those one or two people, you might then be able to join the group.

In anticipation of playing in either of those scenarios, you can practice by getting used to strumming chords and singing songs, for that's what people do in uke groups.  They either use a songbook or lyrics with chords are projected on a big screen (sometimes with a strumming pattern indicated as well) and they all strum chords and sing together.  Try that for yourself.  You might start with two-chord songs like "Jambalaya" and then move on to three-chords songs like "Jamaica Farewell" and then four-chord songs like "Let it Be" and so forth.

 

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
05/01/19 12:06:06PM
1,105 posts

Ducimer comission


Instruments- discuss specific features, luthiers, instrument problems & questions

I can't wait to see this dulcimer!  And if you need someone to test drive it for you I'd be glad to volunteer.winker

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
04/28/19 03:19:05PM
1,105 posts

Lyle Rickards on MD and singing in upcoming film


General mountain dulcimer or music discussions

Wow!  That playing is superb. He's really got the bounce in that dulcimer.  Film looks interesting too, but I could listen to that dulcimer all day.

No comment on the kid smoking a cig.

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
04/28/19 01:26:44PM
1,105 posts

Preferred String Tension


General mountain dulcimer or music discussions

I regularly tune to C or C# when I fingerpick.  I don't use fingerpicks, but just my bare fingers, and I like the extra "give" in the strings. 

However, when I flatpick I want the strings very taught, as any extra give means the note is sounding slightly later than when you pluck it since the string bends before it makes any noise.  In other words, its harder to flatpick fast and accurately with looser strings.  So for flatpicking I tune to D and move my picking hand back towards the bridge or even tune up to D# or E.

I guess what I'm saying is that looser strings provide greater right-hand control when playing with fingertips but less control when playing with a pick.  So I adjust my tuning and my playing accordingly.

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
04/27/19 12:24:10PM
1,105 posts

The Drifting Thread...


OFF TOPIC discussions

Sorry to hear about your (ironic) injury, Robert.  The only advantage to liquid bandage as opposed to glue is that its antiseptic, so it helps keep things clean as well as sealing the skin. 

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
04/26/19 09:04:42PM
1,105 posts

The Drifting Thread...


OFF TOPIC discussions

Ken Hulme: Two words Dusty:   Liquid Skin.  Works the charm for me. 

Yep.  I have a liquid bandage called New Skin on there right now.

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
04/26/19 04:48:46PM
1,105 posts

The Drifting Thread...


OFF TOPIC discussions

Thanks, folks.  The cut is too tiny to whine about or to deserve any sympathy.  The problem really is not being able to play any fretted instruments.  I pulled out the autoharp, which has been in its case for a year or more.  Maybe in a few hours I'll be done tuning it. headbang 

@Jan-Potts, I had a student several years ago who lost significant portions of her leg to a flesh-eating bacteria.  Gruesome stuff.

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
04/26/19 01:04:26PM
1,105 posts

The Drifting Thread...


OFF TOPIC discussions

Somehow yesterday I got the tiniest little cut on the very tip of the index finger of my left hand.  It's not serious at all, but just enough to cause some pain when I try to fret strings.  I guess I'll be playing a little noter/drone for a while.  Or maybe it's time to break out the autoharp.

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
04/25/19 10:30:53PM
1,105 posts

Online dulcimer schools


Dulcimer Resources:TABS/Books/websites/DVDs

Garret, lot of individual instructors offer online lessons.  But as far as I know, those are the only two dulcimer schools online.  They share some basic similarities: both involve monthly subscriptions that give you access to a range of materials for different levels of play.  Dulcimer Crossing involves a greater variety of different instructors, for in addition to Steve Eulberg, there are lessons by Erin Mae Lewis, Nina Zanetti, Neal Hellman, Abrey Atwater, and others.  The Dulcimer School has Stephen Seifert and to a lesser extent Aaron O'Rourke.

In the interests of full disclosure, I should say that I know both Steve Eulberg and Stephen Seifert personally and am fond of them both.  Both are excellent teachers with decades of experience teaching dulcimer.  If you've been playing for a while and have a knowledge of basic music theory you may find some of the lessons "below" your needs, but that doesn't mean they are useless. I often just use the tab and the performance videos to learn tunes and skip the lessons that go measure by measure through a tune.

My advice would be to join both schools for a month and poke around a lot. You might decide one works better for you than the other.  Or you might decide that you would get more out of private lessons than you would from joining either one.  But you can always cancel your subscription anytime, so there are no long-term commitments. 

Oh, and happy birthday!partycake

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
04/17/19 08:17:26PM
1,105 posts

Lullabies from Around the World -- Dusty's tab book available


FOR SALE:instruments/music items/CDs/Wanted to Buy...

I'm glad it got there safely, Ken. I hope you find a few melodies to your liking.

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
04/15/19 12:49:57PM
1,105 posts

Dulcimer-Guitar Style Options?


Instruments- discuss specific features, luthiers, instrument problems & questions

I'm sorry to hear Ken's description of the shoddy construction of the Seagull Merlin.  I have a Seagull 12-string guitar that is very nice (exceptional for the price) and made in Canada. The only Merlin I played (for a total of 3 minutes) had a slightly bigger and warmer sound than other strumsticks, but it oddly has only a 6+ and not a 6 fret. And it only has a total of 7 or 8 frets, so you only have one octave to work with.  The price is about that of a student model dulcimer, so I don't see it as having much of a purpose at all. If, as Ken states, many of them are not playable due to misplaced frets, it's a real shame.  No wonder you see so many on Ebay.

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
04/14/19 03:34:06AM
1,105 posts

Dulcimer-Guitar Style Options?


Instruments- discuss specific features, luthiers, instrument problems & questions

@Butch-Ross sometimes plays the dulcimer like a guitar.  He has a special dulcimer that only has half of an upper bout so that he can wrap his hand around the fretboard. Check out this video.  I think he had it custom-made, but I'm not sure.  He is a member here, so you might ask him.  If that design is something you're interested in, you might contact some of the luthiers here and see if they can make you a custom instrument.

I don't think putting heavier strings on a tin-sounding instrument like a strumstick will have more than a negligible effect. If you want a big, warm sound, you would generally need a pretty big box.

Let me add that I think your playing will be limited if you play by wrapping your hands around the fretboard. If nothing else, you eliminate the possibility of using your thumb.  Notice in the video of Butch Ross that although he plays standing up for that first tune, which mostly involves strumming chords to accompany his voice, in the next clip, which involves much more elaborate fingering, he is sitting down and playing a regular dulcimer. (You might also compare the 3rd and 4th tunes in the same video for the same contrast.)


updated by @dusty-turtle: 04/14/19 03:49:50AM
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
04/12/19 02:03:51AM
1,105 posts

Lullabies from Around the World -- Dusty's tab book available


FOR SALE:instruments/music items/CDs/Wanted to Buy...

Hi all.  If you prefer to order directly from me instead of from The Book Patch, please visit my website.  Thanks!

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
04/04/19 07:07:27PM
1,105 posts

The Positive Thread...


OFF TOPIC discussions

Thanks for sharing that story, Strumelia.  It is amazing how music touches something indescribable inside of us.  The stories in Patricia and Wayne's latest Hearts of the Dulcimer Podcast tell similar stories about people at the other end of the lifecycle who have declined into a non-verbal state but still react quite alertly to music.

Watching the toddler in that video reminded me of my experience with my niece many years ago.  I used to visit my sister about once a month when she and her family lived in LA.  I would always bring my mandolin and sometimes my guitar as well.  My niece was too small to talk or even to walk at the time, but I remember vividly her crawling over to me, trying to drag my mandolin case behind her by the strap.  She was huffing and puffin by the time she got it to me, but then she just sat up looking at me, clearly waiting for me to start playing.  I used to think it was evidence of a deep connection between us, but looking back, the connection was probably between her and the music. I was just a messenger.


updated by @dusty-turtle: 04/04/19 07:08:02PM
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
04/04/19 05:05:24PM
1,105 posts

looking for a new trad instrument


FOR SALE:instruments/music items/CDs/Wanted to Buy...

If you eat a lot of carrots, perhaps you will save money and you can afford a lot of karats as well as perhaps some carats.  But I'm a poor writer, so I use more carets. ROTFL

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
04/04/19 12:13:45AM
1,105 posts

looking for a new trad instrument


FOR SALE:instruments/music items/CDs/Wanted to Buy...

Hey BRAshley, I just wanted to say "hi and welcome back."  I remember your lively discussions when I first discovered the dulcimer world.

 

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
04/02/19 10:59:54AM
1,105 posts

Lullabies from Around the World -- Dusty's tab book available


FOR SALE:instruments/music items/CDs/Wanted to Buy...

MacAodha: Very well done Dusty and best wishes with this project.

Thanks, Val.


updated by @dusty-turtle: 04/02/19 11:00:06AM
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
04/01/19 09:20:26PM
1,105 posts

Lullabies from Around the World -- Dusty's tab book available


FOR SALE:instruments/music items/CDs/Wanted to Buy...

Thanks for your support, @Ken-Longfield.  I am pretty sure that you'll find a few lullabies in the book that will speak to you.  A few are really short, so you may want to create a medley for a CD.  As I say in the video, my personal favorite is Thula Baba.  Check out this video of Kimmy Skota singing it first in her native Zulu and then in Afrikaans.

Look for a personal message from me, too.

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
04/01/19 05:35:05PM
1,105 posts

Lullabies from Around the World -- Dusty's tab book available


FOR SALE:instruments/music items/CDs/Wanted to Buy...

Thanks so much, @Ken-Hulme.  This effort all started with me just searching for songs that the beginners in my local dulcimer group could learn quickly.  Then I taught a couple of workshops on lullabies at dulcimer festivals, and after a time I had enough for a whole book.

It's been an exhilarating process.  Now I just have to learn California tax law enough to know how to handle online sales.  In the meantime, I'll just rely on The Book Patch to do that for me.

Thanks again. 

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
04/01/19 04:53:47PM
1,105 posts

Lullabies from Around the World -- Dusty's tab book available


FOR SALE:instruments/music items/CDs/Wanted to Buy...

Hey now hey!  I am really excited to announce that my first book of mountain dulcimer tab is now available:

Lullabies from Around the World arranged for the beginning mountain dulcimer.

FRONT COVER FINAL 2 small file.jpg

$20 + shipping/handling

The book contains over 20 lullabies presented in both standard music notation and dulcimer tablature, all intended for DAd or other 158 tuning.  All the tunes can be played either with a flatpick or in a fingerpicking style, and lyrics with English translations are presented for all tunes.

Buy Dusty's Lullabies from Around the World from The Book Patch now!

The arrangements are designed for the beginner player, and lullabies are perfect in this regard, since the simple melodies fit easily on the dulcimer's diatonic fretboard, and lullabies include a lot of repetition and are intended to be played slowly.  These melodies are, very simply, beautiful, soothing and calming.

An Appendix includes:

     1) an original lullaby I wrote entitled "Please Take Your Time Growing Older"

     2) a discussion of 6 specific strategies to enhance the basic arrangements in the book

     3) an enhanced arrangement of one of the tunes

Attached is a copy of the table of contents, and if you want more information, please view this video of me describing the book and playing some sample tunes.

Once I learn more about internet commerce and taxes here in California I will sell the book from my website, but for now you can buy the book directly from The Book Patch.

Buy Dusty's Lullabies from Around the World from The Book Patch now!

If you have any questions, please contact me through the Private Message system here at FOTMD or the Contact Dusty page at the River City Dulcimers website.

If you buy the book, please let me know, and I'll mail to you free of charge this 3" x 3" sticker offering helpful and humorous advice on solid left-hand fingering technique.  The sticker looks great on a dulcimer case, a water bottle, a bicycle helmet, or whatever.

curved finger 4 with RCD URL.jpg


Table of Contents.pdf - 14KB

updated by @dusty-turtle: 04/12/19 01:06:45AM
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
03/27/19 08:35:59PM
1,105 posts

What songs are familiar to today’s young kids?


General mountain dulcimer or music discussions

It's mostly the same tunes, but with updated lyrics.  Instead of "If you're happy and you know it clap your hands" you have to sing "If you're happy and you know retweet this meme."  ROTFL

 

Seriously, my kid was in kindergarten about a decade ago, and the songs were basically the same as when I was a kid.  In fact, you're giving me a good idea for a "Call the Tune" for any songs for kids.  We could all share our ideas for good songs for kids.

 /