German folk song tabs

jost
@jost
2 months ago
40 posts

Another lovely song from the Zupfgeigenhansl is this one "Dunkle Wolk". Originally it was a song of traveling journeymen. Most verses were lost for a long time thus Hans Breuer assumed it was about the thirty year's year since his source was a print of the first verse from 1646. He wrote a second verse and added a third from a song of moravian journeymen thus creating the most known version today. This version was recorded by Hamburg folk group Liederjan in the 1970s . Another version was made by singer/songwriter Hannes Wader. A quite nice touch is in the version of actor/singer Manfred Krug with lute accompiement.

I used the tune printed in the songbook "Kein schöner Land in dieser Zeit" of Thomas Friz and Erich Schmeckenbecher. The tune is identical to Breuers version, they give some different chords for the guitar though. Since the tune is the traditional tune they might be typos or other errors. 

Tuning is DAg or any other dorian tuning (CGF,DGC etc)
As with "Wenn alle Brünnlein fließen" I still have to practice so no sound file at the moment.

Have fun :)

pdf


updated by @jost: 10/17/21 12:52:05PM
Ken Longfield
Ken Longfield
@ken-longfield
2 months ago
810 posts

Thank you Jost. I enjoyed listening to the different performances of this folk song. I'm going to try to learn it on the dulcimer.

Ken

"The dulcimer sings a sweet song."

jost
@jost
2 months ago
40 posts

Here is the variant with the changes by Friz/Schmeckenbecher, dear moderators please remove if you consider the legal risk to high. 


updated by @jost: 10/17/21 09:34:36AM
jost
@jost
2 months ago
40 posts

Hello everybody,

some might remember I tried to arrange transsylvanian saxons folk song "Klein wild vögelein" for mountain dulcimer. In the end it didn't worked out so I'm still playing it on guitar.

In the process however I discovered some other German folk songs who work a lot better. Although I still need to practice them (so no sound files at the moment) I'm ready to upload my tabs now. 
One caveat though: Although I think the songs are in public domain it might be they are actually not. I took versions from several songbooks. Although the songs are traditional the tune in the song books might be a newer arrangement. I'll flag these versions so moderators might remove them, if they feel that they are not ok.

The first song i want to provide you with is the charming love song "Wenn alle Brünnlein" fließen. 
There are several great recordings, one by German folk duo Zupfgeigenhansl:

Zupfgeigenhansl-Wenn alle Brünnlein fließen

They changed the tune a little bit to fit the mandolin accompaniment of Erich Schmeckenbecher. 

Austrian-American Singer Martha Schlamme recorded it with Pete Seeger on Banjo:
Martha Schlamme/Pete Seeger-Wenn alle Brünnlein fließen

Seeger also did it in a concert in East Berlin, there is a nice video of his performance (including audience partizipation ;))

The songs lyrics are like this: 

1. Wenn alle Brünnlein fließen, / so muss man trinken, / wenn ich mein Schatz nicht rufen darf, / tu ich ihm winken, / wenn ich mein Schatz nicht rufen darf, / ju ja, rufen darf, / tu ich ihm winken.

2. Ja, winken mit den Äugelein / und treten auf den Fuß! / 's ist eine in der Stube drin, / die meine werden muss, /  's ist eine in der Stube drin, / ju ja, Stube drin, / die meine werden muss.

3. Warum sollt sie's nicht werden, / ich hab sie ja so gern; / sie hat zwei braune Äugelein, / die leuchten wie zwei Stern', /  sie hat zwei braune Äugelein, / ju ja, Äugelein, / die leuchten wie zwei Stern'.

4. Sie hat zwei rote Wängelein, / sind röter als der Wein; / ein solches Mädel find'st du nicht / wohl unterm Sonnenschein. / Ein solches Mädel find'st du nicht / ju ja, find'st du nicht, / wohl unterm Sonnenschein.

5. So herzlich wie mein Lieselein / ist keine auf der Welt, / vom Köpfchen bis zum Füßelein / ist alles wohl bestellt. /    Vom Köpfchen bis zum Füßelein / ju ja, Füßelein, / ist alles wohl bestellt.

6. Ach herzger Schatz, ich bitte dich, / ach, lass mich gehen! / Denn deine Leut die schmähen mich, / ich muss mich schämen. /    Denn deine Leut die schmähen mich, / ju ja, schmähen mich, / ich muss mich schämen.

7. Was frag ich nach den Leuten, / die mich tun schmähen? / Ich liebe ja ganz ewiglich / dies schöne Mädchen! /    Ich liebe ja ganz ewiglich / ju ja, ewiglich / dies schöne Mädchen!


A rough English translation provided by deepl:
1. When all the fountains are flowing, / you have to drink, / if I'm not allowed to call my sweetheart / I'll wave at it, / 
if  I'm not allowed to call my sweetheart, l'll wave at it.
2. Ses, wave with the eyes / and step on the foot! / There's one in the parlor, / that must become mine, / 
There's one in the parlor,  in the parlor, / that must become mine.
3. Why shouldn't she be, / I like her so much, / she has two brown eyes, / that shine like two stars, / 
she has two brown eyes, / that shine like two stars.
4. She has two red cheeks, / redder than the wine; / you won't find such a girl / under the sunshine. /
 you won't find such a girl   under the sunshine.
5. As hearty as my Lieselein / is none in the world, / from the head to the feet / everything is well ordered. / 
From the little head to the little feet / ju ja, little feet /  everything is well ordered.
6. Oh dear darling, I beg you, / oh, let me go! / For your people revile me, / I must be ashamed. / 
For your people revile me, / yes, revile me, / I must be ashamed.
7. What do I ask of the people who revile me? / I love forever / this beautiful girl! / I love forever / yes, forever / this beautiful 


The most prominent version was collected by German folklorist Hans Breuer in his book "Der Zupfgeigenhansl" in 1910, which features just the first four verses. The verses 5-7 are regional variants collected by the Bavarian folk art center of the states government.

Since Breuer was killed in action in world war 1 it's safe to assume that his version is in public domain now. 
Thus I will add it as attachment to his post.

Thomas Fritz and Erich Schmeckenbecher founded the folk group "Zupfgeigenhansel" (obviouvsly a reference to Breuers collection) in the 1970s. They took several songs from Breuers and other folklorists songbooks. Sometimes (when the tune got lost) they made up their own tune or changed it to better fit their style. They also published song books with their versions. I also adopted their versions (they mainly changed the D7 chords to D, propably  for the mandolin) but I'm not sure whether it's considered fair use or not. Thus I will upload it in a answer, so it can be removed if a moderator has obligations. 

You can use any ionian tuning for Noter/Drone playing. The original key is G-major thus I use DGd-tuning on my Dulcimer and the G ionian tuning on my hummel. Up to now my playing is not fit for recording. 

Have fun and best regards, Jost
Edit: Fixed some wrong chords.


updated by @jost: 10/17/21 09:35:08AM