Questions about a chord

sleepingangel
@sleepingangel
2 years ago
109 posts

Dusty Turtle:
sleepingangel:and would 2-(a string) 3 (low d) and 4 (High d) be an A7?
The short answer is yes, that is an A7.   It is standard, however, in the dulcimer world to refer to chords beginning with the bass string and then moving towards you, so the chord you describe would simply be 324.  Another easy A7 is 123. And remember that in DAd tuning, all the chords are reversible, so 324 can also be 423.  123 can also be 321.  Easy, isn't it?

OHHHHHH that makes sense Dusty...thanks so much I wasn't looking at it quite right. I was thinking that you needed to describe it in "order of appearance on the fret board but the way you said make more sense....thanks so much...and yeah that reversible thing is very cool...can't do that on a guitar lol...

Maria

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
2 years ago
886 posts

sleepingangel:
and would 2-(a string) 3 (low d) and 4 (High d) be an A7?

The short answer is yes, that is an A7.  

It is standard, however, in the dulcimer world to refer to chords beginning with the bass string and then moving towards you, so the chord you describe would simply be 324.  Another easy A7 is 123. And remember that in DAd tuning, all the chords are reversible, so 324 can also be 423.  123 can also be 321.  Easy, isn't it?




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Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

"A good song makes you laugh, it makes you cry, it makes you think."
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sleepingangel
@sleepingangel
2 years ago
109 posts

Skip:
Since a 7th chord actually consists of 4 notes both of them are abbreviated 7ths. We, as MD players, use short chords quite alot. With that in mind both can be considered dominant 7th inversions, D7/A7, as you say. An easy way to figure a 7th [dominant] is to add the note name 2 half [1 whole] steps before the root note of the basic chord triad; ie., D= DF#A; 7th = DF#AC. A major 7th is formed if the 4th note is the same note name a half step before the chord root. The player has to determine which combination of the 4 notes works the best for them in each case. 

Okay cool so I'm glad I'm on the right track!! thanks so much for the added information!

Maria

Skip
@skip
2 years ago
219 posts

Since a 7th chord actually consists of 4 notes both of them are abbreviated 7ths. We, as MD players, use short chords quite alot. With that in mind both can be considered dominant 7th inversions, D7/A7, as you say. An easy way to figure a 7th [dominant] is to add the note name 2 half [1 whole] steps before the root note of the basic chord triad; ie., D= DF#A; 7th = DF#AC. A major 7th is formed if the 4th note is the same note name a half step before the chord root. The player has to determine which combination of the 4 notes works the best for them in each case. 


updated by @skip: 11/16/15 03:29:41PM
sleepingangel
@sleepingangel
2 years ago
109 posts

and would 2-(a string) 3 (low d) and 4 (High d) be an A7?

sleepingangel
@sleepingangel
2 years ago
109 posts
Hi as you all know I'm new to the Dulcimer. I downloaded some free chord charts but this one that I "stumbled upon" while exploring my dulcimer isn't there. I think it's a D dominant 7
It's 6-5-7 (the fret board still confuses me a bit since I'm a guitar player and used to it being chromatic. Thanks so much. And the 6 is the low d string the 5 is the a string and the 7 is the high d string.
Thank and I hope this was the right place to ask this
Maria