Stewart McCormick
Stewart McCormick
@stewart-mccormick
4 years ago
65 posts
This image is the only other example of his/their work I was able to find! And this article from 1999...

https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/local/1999/05/16/a-pursuit-plucked-from-the-past/2c8f6e56-ba54-4e5a-b484-d286e8fe9224/?utm_term=.9372412fbf9a
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Stewart McCormick
Stewart McCormick
@stewart-mccormick
4 years ago
65 posts
And thank you Ken Hulme and Ken Longfield for your suggestions! It is driving me crazy, not being able to see for myself...
Stewart McCormick
Stewart McCormick
@stewart-mccormick
4 years ago
65 posts
Hi Bob! It is, I guess a modern take take on the Mountain Dulcimer's predecessor? I was thinking of converting it to a five string? I won't know for sure until it arrives and I see what exactly I am working with...
Bob
Bob
@bob
4 years ago
86 posts

Is that a hollow fret board with four strings above and four inside it?

Ken Longfield
Ken Longfield
@ken-longfield
4 years ago
810 posts

I would put some super glue in the crack and use a clamp to see if the crack closes up and glues together. Actually I'd try the clamp first and if the wood moved with the clamp then I would remove the clamp, put glue in the crack, and then clamp it. A little accelerator sprayed on the crack after it is glued and clamp will harden it up quickly.

Ken

"The dulcimer sings a sweet song."

Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
4 years ago
1,872 posts

That's a crack in the headstock, not the fretboard.  They are two separate pieces. So there should be no danger of the crack spreading into the actual fretboard.

As Matt describes, carefully add drops of thin superglue to fill up the crack.  Then you'll be able to tell if the crack is spreading.  

Matt Berg
Matt Berg
@matt-berg
4 years ago
77 posts

The builder did a wonderful job of putting together a unique instrument.  Eight strings on a thin scroll head is a lot of pressure.  The sides of the head are perhaps a tad thin for that many strings.

Every instrument has the danger of cracking.  An instrument as detailed as yours needs continuous care, especially to maintain constant humidity.  It cracked once and could crack again.  If you know a luthier nearby, ask them to look at the crack.

Stewart McCormick
Stewart McCormick
@stewart-mccormick
4 years ago
65 posts
Is there danger of the crack spreading further down the board though?
Stewart McCormick
Stewart McCormick
@stewart-mccormick
4 years ago
65 posts
Thanks Matt! I was thinking it might needed clamped, glued, and possibly some thin cleats to hold...
Matt Berg
Matt Berg
@matt-berg
4 years ago
77 posts
It looks like a fracture from drying rather than stress. Place the instrument so the opening Dave's up.mask off the sides of the crack. Then SLOWLY, one or two drops at a time put in thin super glue and let dry. It will take a while, but eventually the crack will fill. Patience.
Stewart McCormick
Stewart McCormick
@stewart-mccormick
4 years ago
65 posts
Another shot...
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Stewart McCormick
Stewart McCormick
@stewart-mccormick
4 years ago
65 posts
Full body shot...
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Stewart McCormick
Stewart McCormick
@stewart-mccormick
4 years ago
65 posts
Purchased a beautiful dulcimer that needs a little TLC! It has a crack at the nut on the headstock, any suggestions on where to start when it comes in?
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