Ken Longfield
Ken Longfield
@ken-longfield
3 years ago
657 posts

Back in the mid-1970s while visiting International Violin Company in Baltimore, the owner talked me in to trying some "marine" grade plywood he had on hand for a dulcimer. It was mahogany on the outer layers. It worked well for a teardrop dulcimer. I did not to try doing an hourglass bend with it. I did not weigh it, but I thought it was a little heavier than my solid rosewood dulcimers of the same pattern. I also made a courting dulcimer using the plywood for the back and sides. It seemed to work well.

Ken

"The dulcimer sings a sweet song."

John C. Knopf
John C. Knopf
@john-c-knopf
3 years ago
209 posts

Baltic birch plywood is of very high quality, and I've used it a couple of times with great results.  It's relatively expensive.  I got mine at my local Woodcraft store.

Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
3 years ago
1,736 posts

You cannot tell the type of wood by the mass of the instrument.  Only a visual examination of the edges of both the side strips and the top & bottom boards can give you a definitive answer.  

marg
@marg
3 years ago
546 posts

(If you can see the edge, )

Edge as inside the sound hole or on the side where top meets sides

John C. Knopf
John C. Knopf
@john-c-knopf
3 years ago
209 posts

Solid wood and plywood can weigh about the same.  If you can see the edge, you can see the plys in plywood.

Plywood in a dulcimer is not always a bad thing, except in cases of the use of inferior pieces of cheap plywood.

Kusani
Kusani
@kusani
3 years ago
128 posts

One would need to see the wood to determine; weight along won't do it. 2 lbs is not an unusual weight. 

 

marg
@marg
3 years ago
546 posts

Can you tell if a dulcimer is wood or ply by it's weight?

If a dulcimer is 36" x 8" x 3 or 4" & weights about 2 lbs, can we tell by that if it's wood or only partly?


updated by @marg: 07/10/18 01:36:37AM