Do Not Upgrade Your Mac To Catalina For A Bit

Black Dog Bess
Black Dog Bess
@black-dog-bess
3 weeks ago
26 posts

Thanks Strumelia! You are a fabulous source of knowledge for many things!

blackdogbess, Barb

Strumelia
Strumelia
@strumelia
3 weeks ago
1,699 posts

Follow simple instructions to see which apps currently on your Mac are 32 bit and will not function in Catalina:   https://www.macobserver.com/tips/how-to/macos-find-32-bit-apps/

 

@black-dog-bess : keep your eye on this Webroot support forum thread: https://community.webroot.com/webroot-secureanywhere-for-macs-18/product-update-webroot-secureanywhere-for-macos-catalina-340620
It looks as though you might have a Catalina-compatible Webroot version available by mid November.  You should be able to get your remaining paid subscription applied when you update your WR version.




--
Site Owner

Those irritated by grain of sand best avoid beach.
-Strumelia proverb c.1990
Black Dog Bess
Black Dog Bess
@black-dog-bess
3 weeks ago
26 posts

Good advice! I lost my antivirus programs to Catalina. I could not open Webroot which was supplied with the new Mac I bought from Best Buy. I thought, oh well, back to Norton but Norton products are incompatible too! Thank goodness Clean My Mac has some protective features. I think what surprised me is that these programs are well known, how could Apple have gone ahead with it's upgrade without even thinking about compatibility with the rest of the world? 

Barb

Skip
Skip
@skip
4 weeks ago
241 posts

I've used linux 20+ years and I dual boot Ubuntu/Win 10.

You might try these on tefview:  

www.banjohangout.org/archive/223939

Phroedrick
Phroedrick
@phroedrick
4 weeks ago
52 posts

Regarding what Apple employees say, especially those selling product, they do not know squat.

As for 20 years of work, I’m thinking a Linux box will open them. I am running two Linux computers, each started life as a bare bones computer I bought on Amazon. There are lots of these and they come with everything you need except a hard drive and memory. Most, if not all, run 64 bit Linux or Windows. I paid about $120 each, another $40 or so to install 16 GB memory. The hard drive is really up to you, and they’re really inexpensive, except for the large capacity SSDs. They all have numerous types of video out, as well as SD memory slots and, usually, an abundance of USB ports across 1.0 to 3.0 specs. Just about any monitor works. In total, my in cost was around $200.

Software for photos and graphics abound. The old reliable, upgraded nicely a bit ago, is GIMP (Graphic Image Manipulation Package) and it is as good or better than Photoshop. My favorite office suite is Libre Office, as it has all the same apps as Microsoft Office, plus a well behaved database. Again, the apps, as well as the Linux Op system of your choice are FREE. You’re invited to donate when you download, and it’s not required. I donate regularly, as we really need a good alternative to Mac’s OS X, and the security hole known as Windows.

There are several flavors of Linux, and ISO images for all are available for download. I recommend getting the ISO from the software house that produces the OS and not from third party sites like Softonic, that can be loaded with stuff you don’t want. Firefox is the preferred browser, most VPNs work across all Linux distros.

I’ve tried most Linux releases and settled on Ubuntu 18.x.x as I prefer the interface and the ease of installation, upgrading, and variety of apps supported. I recommend trying a few distros before deciding on one. Try ChaletOS, Ubuntu, Elementary OS, and Ubuntu Studio if your stuff is multimedia.

Setting up printers takes a bit, yet I have successfully set up every printer I’ve owned using the CUPS app. There is a learning curve, and it’s short, as most distros mimic either Windows or Mac interfaces.

Your Mac can download all the Linux distros, and you burn the downloaded ISO to DVD using Disk Doctor.

Some things do not work under Linux as yet, mostly due to developers not yet having created a Linux version. One that comes to mind is TEFView.

I highly recommend giving Linux a go. Yep, you can ask me to help and I’m happy to do so. Lastly, avoid getting a Chromebook, even though the net is full of articles about Linux working on that platform. It doesn’t do so reliably.

Sorry for the lengthy post. I just think people should move away from Apple and Microsoft, as neither has any respect for the enormous amount of work product users have created over the years. It’s arrogant to expect us to toss it, or redo it.

Skip
Skip
@skip
4 weeks ago
241 posts

Thirty-two bit support is pretty much on the way out, across the board, on all fronts, not just Apple.

John Gribble
John Gribble
@john-gribble
4 weeks ago
86 posts

I think I've bought my last Apple machine. After being assured this new computer would open all my old Apple documents by two different Apple employees, I got it home and discovered it wouldn't. 20 years worth of work.  

Phroedrick
Phroedrick
@phroedrick
4 weeks ago
52 posts

Yes, 64 bit is what it supports. I always have Time Machine running regular backups. Thing is, even though Apple is committing to all 64 bit does not mean we should all have to buy new printers, apps and the like. It’s kind of arrogant on their part, and on the part of printer manufacturers not updating drivers. Anyway, I’m going full Linux after considering it for about a year.

FoundryRat
FoundryRat
@foundryrat
4 weeks ago
8 posts

The main problem with Catalina is that it no longer supports 32bit programs, only 64 bit. Many apps, including printer drivers, are 32 bit and many of them won't be updated to 64 bit soon if ever. I'm glad Phroedrick could go back to Mojave, but if you haven't backed up your computer, you could really be out of luck.

Robin Thompson
Robin Thompson
@robin-thompson
one month ago
976 posts

We'd gotten an email from Noodlesoft about the Apple glitches so plan to hold-off on our upgrade to Catalina.  I'm sorry that happened to you, Phroedrick, and all can be set right soon!   




--
Robin T
one of the Moderators here :)
Keep a song in your heart!
Phroedrick
Phroedrick
@phroedrick
one month ago
52 posts

if you use a Mac desktop (iMac) I recommend you wait to upgrade to the latest OS X, Catalina. My adventure began around 9:00 this morning when I started the upgrade. Three and a half hours later it finished and that is when I found out several apps, most of those, I use for business (about half graphics apps) no longer work with this new OS. Further, updates for these are not yet available on the App Store. Apple’s list of incompatibilities is by no means complete or accurate.

It’s not a small issue for me, as I have a folder with around 1,500 JPEGs and other graphics files that no longer call the app used to create them. In addition, neither of my two printers, one a Samsung laser, and the other an Epson ET, print anything now except gibberish. Presently, the Mac is tied up restoring to the state it was in yesterday, before the upgrade. Essentially, I’ve lost an entire day’s productivity due to this sloppy upgrade from Apple.

It isn’t my intention to whine and complain here. My point is if you have an Apple desktop computer, hold off for a few weeks before upgrading. Then, if and when you do, backup everything using Time Machine BEFORE installing this OS. That way you can unwind things if it goes sideways for you.

====================
Follow up to original post:

After fourteen hours, my Mac is restored back to working condition running under Mojave. The rollback from Catalina is not a slam dunk, as Catalina repartitions the hard drive, making a simple restore from Time Machine impossible without first erasing/deleting the second partition, reformatting the entire Mac hard drive and then restoring. The restore process alone can take hours, depending on what you've got on your Mac.

I have years of work on this Mac, and sure it's backed up. Thing I wonder is just how it is Apple and its developers think it's okay to do so much restructuring of the OS, that it renders many popular apps useless. It's really unacceptable.

SOLUTION is to go to a Linux computer (use Ubuntu). The OS is free, updated frequently, yet with consideration for users. The office suite, LibreOffice is as good as Microsoft Office, and is, as the Linux OS, free. Then there's the graphics app, GIMP (Graphic Image Manipulation Program) that is also free and is as good or better than Photoshop. Yep, been working on that transition and this Apple update has pushed me over the edge and fully into committing to Linux as my main OS. If you are interested in switching from Microsoft and its constant pay by the month software, or tired of Apples incessant, unreliable updates, I recommend you give Linux a try. Interested, drop me a private message and I'll happily point you to the correct resources.


updated by @phroedrick: 10/10/19 02:01:41PM