Do You Have A Favorite Irish Song?

folkfan
@folkfan
11 years ago
366 posts
I can't really imagine slowing "The Little Beggerman" down, but I'm sort of set in my ways having heard it played and sung like this:
for so many decades (DECADES????????????) Oh well. :-) Paul Elliot Bostick said:
Song speed. I can play Begger Man fast, I learned from the Arlo version. Later I was playing at a camper rally and a guitar player asked me why I played everthing so fast, I just leared it that way. Over time I worked on slowing things down and found I can play a slow bluesy tempo to a lot of fast paced songs. It makes for something different and helps me learn the fast ones by working at a slower place. Little Begger man slowed down is one I really enjoy playing.
folkfan
@folkfan
11 years ago
366 posts
Great story. It's marvelous that you were able to get the mementos back to the lady in England. That's sweet and truly brings a "tear to the e'e". Paul Elliot Bostick said:
Littler Beggar Man and how things crossed the Pond.

During the 70's I was in Mississippi visiting my grandmother, mom and I went junk shop browsing. In the shop I found a portable letter writing box, it's wood with two front door that open up to show all kinds of small nooks and crannies and such. I was told it came in from a shipment from England, so I bought it. After getting back to my grandmothers house I realize that when you tilted it there was something moving around in the bottom of it. Unknown to me (and apparently everyone else) there is a small slide out drawer that had become stuck. When I finally got it open, I found it was packed full of all kinds of wonderful things like a piano tuning receipt from the late 1800,s, letters, a glass plate photo negative, and report cards from two girls during the 1940s. There were many references to a small town on the coast of southern England. I never really had a way of following up on the information before the internet so it slid by. Several years later, I had picked up a dulcimer. I play by ear and was trying to pick up the tune Red Haired Boy from an Arlo Guthrie album, (the fact that Arlo does not annunciate clearly when he is singing fast did not help). I wrote a note to Dulcimer Player news about my need for the words. Sometime later, I got a message from a gentleman in England who advised me that he knew the song as Little Beggerman and he provided the lyrics that he knew of. It also turned out that he lived a few miles down the road from the little sea side town mentioned in my letterbox letters. I wrote him and asked that if he was ever down the road could he stop into the local newspaper/or provide me the address. He did both, as well as relaying my story to the paper that then ran a story. I was then contacted by an elderly lady from the seaside town who advised: The letter box had belonged to her mother. The report cards were hers and her sisters (she said the sister died very young from an illness and she had very few mementos of her). The box had been sold as part of the mothers estate; no one knew there was a drawer or what was in it. I made copies of all the material and then sent the originals to her. She did send me a copy of the local paper that had done a follow story about the little letter box and its trip across the pond. So now, every time I play Little Beggerman I remember my box, the letters, and the story behind it.
Paul Rappell
Paul Rappell
@paul-rappell
11 years ago
32 posts
"Down by the Sally Garden", an old standby.
folkfan
@folkfan
11 years ago
366 posts
Little Beggerman is a good song, though a bit fast for me. I'd love hearing it and have since the Clancys and Tommy Makem started recording. Though I'm still fairly computer illiterate, I was library literate when it came to borrowing song books and xeroxing everything I knew how to sing. That's why recently, I finally did a TAB toss out of all the songs I'd copied and partially tabbed, but know I'm never going to actually play.So take the time and tell us how you found your music for "Little Beggerman". Paul Elliot Bostick said:
"Little Beggerman" is a favorite. Took me a long time, and a very interesting story, to find the lyrics back in the pre-computer and internet day. Still a favorite.
folkfan
@folkfan
11 years ago
366 posts
Definitely a song about the Jacobite Rebellion and Bonnie Prince Charlie, Will Ye No Come Back Again, was written by Carolina Oliphant, Lady Nairne (1766-1845). And she was a prolific Scottish songwriter. I just got a marvelous CD of her works sung by Anne Lorne Gilles, titled "White Rose of June". The White Rose is associated with Bonnie Charlie as was the White Cockade. George Wentland said:
I think at the moment "Will Ye No' Come Back Again" is my favorite. Tho I am not sure if it's Scotish or Irish.
Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
11 years ago
1,794 posts
Carrickfergus is a tune I've loved since I first heard it on a Chieftains album nearly 40 years ago!
Strumelia
Strumelia
@strumelia
11 years ago
1,917 posts
George Wentland said:
I think at the moment "Will Ye No' Come Back Again" is my favorite. Tho I am not sure if it's Scotish or Irish.
oh George, I used to LOVE playing and singing that song years ago. It's so beautiful. It does have kind of a 'Scottish-y' flavor to it, doesn't it?


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Paul Rappell
Paul Rappell
@paul-rappell
11 years ago
32 posts
Rats! Then it's not my new favourite "Irish song"! It's still good, though. John Shaw said:
"John of Dreams" was written by the English songwriter Bill Caddick. It has been taken up by a lot of people, including quite a number of Irish singers (Christy Moore, for one). Bill inadvertently borrowed most of the opening musical phrase from Tchaikovsky's "Pathetique"!
John Shaw
John Shaw
@john-shaw
11 years ago
60 posts
"John of Dreams" was written by the English songwriter Bill Caddick. It has been taken up by a lot of people, including quite a number of Irish singers (Christy Moore, for one). Bill inadvertently borrowed most of the opening musical phrase from Tchaikovsky's "Pathetique"!
razyn
@razyn
11 years ago
40 posts

Paul Rappell said: Well, I have a new favourite Irish song... It's "John of Dreams" performed (perhaps written?) by Mick Moloney... Anyone else know it? Don't know the song, actually -- but I used to know Mick pretty well, and he's an approachable sort of person. He has a very nice website, and it has an "email Mick" link, if you want to ask him. http://www.mickmoloney.com/index.html
Paul Rappell
Paul Rappell
@paul-rappell
11 years ago
32 posts
Well, I have a new favourite Irish song. I have it on a 1998 compilation CD called Songs from the Heart - A collection of Irish Ballads. It's "John of Dreams" performed (perhaps written?) by Mick Moloney. It had completely slipped by me until recently, when I put the CD on for the first time in years and this one really hit. Anyone else know it?Pair it with Kate Rusby's "Old Man Time" for a couple of moving tunes from the British Isles.
B. Ross Ashley
B. Ross Ashley
@b-ross-ashley
11 years ago
50 posts
I know which one you mean, Ken, we sang it last Saturday night at Song Circle ... but the title escapes me. I don't have a copy of Rise Up Singing, but it is in there. Ken Hulme said:
My Bad!
Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
11 years ago
1,794 posts
My Bad!
John Shaw
John Shaw
@john-shaw
11 years ago
60 posts
You're quite right, folkfan - "Long Black Veil" is an American country song. It was written by Danny Dill and Marijohn Wilkin, and was first recorded by Lefty Frizzell in 1959. A great song, but definitely not Irish.
folkfan
@folkfan
11 years ago
366 posts
Ken, Is the Long Black Veil really Irish in origin? I've always associated it with American Country. I know that the Chieftains have it on an album, but that's the only Irish group that I've ever heard do it. Ken Hulme said:
The Long Black Veil....
Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
11 years ago
1,794 posts
The Long Black Veil....
Stephanie Stuckwisch
Stephanie Stuckwisch
@stephanie-stuckwisch
11 years ago
45 posts
Mo Ghile Mear is great tune. My favorite Irish tune is Siuil a Run. It's a lament for a lover who's gone overseas to fight.
Paul Rappell
Paul Rappell
@paul-rappell
11 years ago
32 posts
Thanks for this. It's a terrific song!There are other versions there, too. I also enjoyed the one from the Highland Sessions, also with Mary Black.Makes you want to learn Gaelic!Paul folkfan said:
I meant to add a YouTube, but don't know how to embed it, so here's the site

folkfan
@folkfan
11 years ago
366 posts
I meant to add a YouTube, but don't know how to embed it, so here's the site
folkfan
@folkfan
11 years ago
366 posts
I have a favorite Irish song, Mo Ghile Mear. The funny thing is, is that it's about Bonnie Prince Charlie.



How's that for combining an interest in the music and history.

updated by @folkfan: 06/11/15 07:23:48AM