Steven Stroot
Steven Stroot
@steven-stroot
2 months ago
32 posts

Thanks everyone for your input.  If nothing else, this was a source of interest and curiosity.  But, unless the maker chimes in, I guess this will remain a music mystery.  

Dusty Turtle
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
2 months ago
1,602 posts

If you Google "true temperament frets" you see lots of guitars with the squiggly frets.  Makes you feel like you poured bourbon on your cereal instead of milk.

truetemperamentfannedfretsstrandberg.jpg

I doubt that's what's going on with the Goodwill dulcimer.




--
Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

As a musician, you have to keep one foot back in the past and one foot forward into the future.
-- Dizzy Gillespie
Strumelia
Strumelia
@strumelia
2 months ago
2,082 posts

I've seen some guitars made with slanted or curvy frets. It's an overly-complex way of avoiding a compensated bridge. A compensated bridge is a heck of a lot easier and gets the job done, maybe a tiny bit less precisely than curved/slanted frets.




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Site Owner

Those irritated by grain of sand best avoid beach.
-Strumelia proverb c.1990
Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
2 months ago
1,988 posts

 I just looked at the pictures, and I don't recall ever seeing anything like that. Maybe some weird attempt to compensate/intonate for string thickness; but 30 degrees seems 'way off the mark?     If it weren't for the ludicrous 33 pound shipping weight for a $30 shipping fee it might be worth the $15 bid price just to see in person.  

Steven Stroot
Steven Stroot
@steven-stroot
2 months ago
32 posts

"Shopgoodwill" has an interesting duclimer up for auction (refer "Unbranded 4 String Wood Dulcimer").  It's obviously very old but the distinctive characteristic are the frets.  Instead of being installed perpendicular to the fretboard, they are positioned at about a 30 degree (estimated) angle from perpendicular.  I've never seen anything like this on a dulcimer or any other fretted instrument.  What do you make of it?