NateBuildsToys
NateBuildsToys
@nate
5 months ago
252 posts

Ken Longfield:


Hi, Nate, I'm the other Ken. Here is a link to an NPR segment on the Lego dulcimer made by Peter Alway: https://www.npr.org/2005/02/06/4487244/lego-my-dulcimer As far as I know Peter was the first person to build a mountain dulcimer out of Lego blocks.


Ken


"The dulcimer sings a sweet song.:


 
Thank you very much "other Ken" xD .That was really neat to listen to. I always enjoy seeing dulcimers made with alternative materials

Ken Longfield
Ken Longfield
@ken-longfield
5 months ago
1,097 posts

Hi, Nate, I'm the other Ken. Here is a link to an NPR segment on the Lego dulcimer made by Peter Alway: https://www.npr.org/2005/02/06/4487244/lego-my-dulcimer As far as I know Peter was the first person to build a mountain dulcimer out of Lego blocks.

Ken

"The dulcimer sings a sweet song.:

NateBuildsToys
NateBuildsToys
@nate
5 months ago
252 posts

Ken Hulme:

Cardboard dulcimers have been around close to 20 years, I'd guess.  They sound remarkably good and are a great inexpensive choice as an entry level dulcimer for folks who aren't sure whether the dulcimer is right for them...  The important thing is that the frets are set true, the body material is of secondary consideration.  In fact the fretboards can be easily transferred to an 'after-market' wooden body which almost anyone can easily construct.   I've played plexiglass and Lego(tm) dulcimers that sound good as well.  

 

Ken, do you have any photos of this lego dulcimer? Or better yet video. You've mentioned it a few times and ive gotten really curious about it. It sounds really interesting.

Nate

Ken Longfield
Ken Longfield
@ken-longfield
5 months ago
1,097 posts

A slight correction, Ken, Backyard Instruments began selling cardboard dulcimers in 1980. I don't know if they were the first, but that's 44 years of cardboard dulcimers.

Ken

"The dulcimer sings a sweet song."

Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
5 months ago
2,126 posts

Cardboard dulcimers have been around close to 20 years, I'd guess.  They sound remarkably good and are a great inexpensive choice as an entry level dulcimer for folks who aren't sure whether the dulcimer is right for them...  The important thing is that the frets are set true, the body material is of secondary consideration.  In fact the fretboards can be easily transferred to an 'after-market' wooden body which almost anyone can easily construct.   I've played plexiglass and Lego(tm) dulcimers that sound good as well.  

John C. Knopf
John C. Knopf
@john-c-knopf
5 months ago
395 posts

That makes 3 of us.  A basic dulcimer but it might have a good sound.  I too have not encountered this maker.

Ken Longfield
Ken Longfield
@ken-longfield
5 months ago
1,097 posts

Like my brother Ken, I have never heard of this maker. I agree with his assessment.

Ken

"The dulcimer sings a sweet song."

motormike
@motormike
5 months ago
16 posts

Thanks Ken...what you say sums up my thoughts as well.
I had no idea that cardboard dulcimers exist.
Don't think that would suit me at all.
What little I've played on this unit sounded good,
and after all, it has lasted 20+ years.
I'd hoped to return into the family of the maker.

Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
5 months ago
2,126 posts

Yep pretty basic instrument. Builder was probably one of the hundreds who were gonna make it big building dulcimers in the Dulcimer Revival... but didn't. No Internet footprint for Danmont Dulcimers.  Trapezoid shape was fairly popular 20+ years ago.  Nothing special.  Sort of a wooden version of today's cardboard dulcimer. No frills, no "modern" 6+ fret, plywood top has a  tear-outs on edges, straight stick fretboard/tuner head.  At least the action doesn't look too high!.  Nice beginner instrument for someone who wants to play Noter & drone style.  Twenty years ago it would have sold for maybe $100-$150.  If you can get $50 today that would be good, IMHO and buyer would have a wooden, not cardboard body dulcimer..

motormike
@motormike
5 months ago
16 posts

Took some snaps.

dulcimer1.jpg
dulcimer1.jpg  •  200KB

dulcimer2.jpg
dulcimer2.jpg  •  55KB

dulcimer3.jpg
dulcimer3.jpg  •  109KB

dulcimer4.jpg
dulcimer4.jpg  •  65KB

dulcimer5.jpg
dulcimer5.jpg  •  68KB

dulcimer6.jpg
dulcimer6.jpg  •  74KB

dulcimer7.jpg
dulcimer7.jpg  •  44KB

dulcimer8.jpg
dulcimer8.jpg  •  31KB

motormike
@motormike
5 months ago
16 posts


Thank you Strumelia for the proper posting category.
I'm not familiar with the format, first time here.
I will, as Ken suggested, take some pix and edit this post.
My focus is to locate the maker, or someone who has knowledge of same.
Would like very much to get this instrument into the hands of  anyone who has
considerable interest in owning it. It's not about money, but rather sentimentality.

Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
5 months ago
2,126 posts

Haven't heard of the maker, but a photo or two would help us ID the instrument.

Strumelia
Strumelia
@strumelia
5 months ago
2,263 posts

Hi Mike, I moved this discussion to the forum about specific instrument makers and questions, so people could find it better. 

Sorry though i have not heard of Danmont Dulcimers. Perhaps someone else here will have and can respond.




--
Site Owner

Those irritated by grain of sand best avoid beach.
-Strumelia proverb c.1990
motormike
@motormike
5 months ago
16 posts

Hello all...thanks for the add.
I own an Appalachian dulcimer.
It has 3 strings and is very simple in design.
There is a paper label inside.
The label is hand-written with sharpie.
Maker is "Danmont Dulcimers"
also listed as an "A-1 model"
Serial no. is 0003
Presumed to have originated in east Tennessee
more than 20 years ago.
Are there ANY members out there who have
ever heard of this maker.
ANY information is welcomed.


updated by @motormike: 01/06/24 02:39:26PM