Ron Zuckerman

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Trepidation

Trepidation



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musician/member name: Ron Zuckerman


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Description:

Illustration of Phrygian mode vs. Locrian mode
Dan
08/18/19 11:54:28AM @dan:

In Dulcimore play, we tune to "xyz" to play do,so,do. I'm contending that 1-5-6 is do,so,do starting on the second staple. Not unlike any other Diatonic tuning from Mixolydian 1-5-8 all the way up the staple board. The second staple starts the Locrian mode not the Phrygian mode, it (Phrygian) starts on the fifth staple. I don't know of the tuning E Bb C. Let us agree to disagree.


Ron Zuckerman
08/18/19 11:30:19AM @ron-zuckerman:

Dan:

I agree that the drones (the bass drone is the root note, the middle drone is the 5th note) will determine the mode. With the melody tuned in accordance with the upper tonic.

Isn't EBC 1-5-6 tuning?

@Dan Technically, EBC and E-Bb-C are both the 1st, 5th, and 6th notes of their respective scales. However, going by the actual interval with respect to the root, EBC is 1-5-b6 (root, perfect 5th, minor 6th), and E-Bb-C is 1-b5-b6 (root, diminished 5th, minor 6th). If you view modes with respect to the intervals between the root note and the individual scale notes, you'll find the following relationships:

Lydian:     1  2  3  #4 5  6  7
Ionian:     1  2  3  4  5  6  7
Mixolydian: 1  2  3  4  5  6  b7
Dorian:     1  2  b3 4  5  6  b7
Aeolian:    1  2  b3 4  5  b6 b7
Phrygian:   1  b2 b3 4  5  b6 b7
Locrian:    1  b2 b3 4  b5 b6 b7

@Robin-Thompson Thanks!


Robin Thompson
08/18/19 10:23:28AM @robin-thompson:

The melody lays nicely on the Phrygian modal scale, Ron-- quite pleasant to listen to!  The Locrian scale offers some cool, weird sounds, though.  Very good demo to let us hear comparison! 


Dan
08/17/19 09:00:56PM @dan:

The 1-5-6 version is pretty good!!!


Dan
08/17/19 07:05:50PM @dan:

I agree that the drones (the bass drone is the root note, the middle drone is the 5th note) will determine the mode. With the melody tuned in accordance with the upper tonic.

Isn't EBC 1-5-6 tuning?


Salt Springs
08/17/19 07:03:27PM @salt-springs:

Bingo!....got it.


Ron Zuckerman
08/17/19 06:26:00PM @ron-zuckerman:

This is an original composition inspired by a discussion as to whether a tune was Phrygian or Locrian. This is only intended to illustrate the difference between these two modes. The melody on its own is modally-ambiguous. It can be considered to be either mode. The note that distinguishes this is the 5th note, and the note is deliberately absent.

In Phrygian, the 5th note is a perfect fifth from the root (1st) note. It sounds pleasing and restful. In Locrian, the 5th note is a diminished fifth (aka tritone). It sounds dissonant and, therefore, tense. So, I would argue that the drones (the bass drone is the root note, the middle drone is the 5th note) will determine the mode.

The tune is played once in Phrygian mode and again in Locrian mode. If you think that Locrian mode sounds weird or out of tune, you're right. The constant dissonance of the drones means that the piece never sounds restful, even when the melody goes to the root note.

To make things simple, I stuck to the "white" key for the melody. The notes are E, F, G, A, C, and D. For Phrygian, the drones are tuned E and B. The B completes the Phrygian scale: E, F, G, A, B, C, D. For Locrian, the drones are tuned E and Bb. The Bb completes the Locrian scale: E, F, G, A, Bb, C, D.