crosby dulcimer from wisconsin?

Strumelia
Strumelia
@strumelia
6 months ago
1,980 posts

I agree, I have a kit dulcimer from the 80s that looks very much the same, just slightly different peg head shape. Something about the thinness of the wood, and the 'cut' appearance of the edges.




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Site Owner

Those irritated by grain of sand best avoid beach.
-Strumelia proverb c.1990

updated by @strumelia: 12/23/20 08:21:18AM
Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
6 months ago
1,835 posts

I had the same thought, Ken.  Just has a "kit" feel to it...

Ken Longfield
Ken Longfield
@ken-longfield
6 months ago
790 posts

If you have nut files for the gauge strings you plan to use, they will work well. Not sure what you mean by guitar file. I've cut slots with a razor saw and widened them with a small triangular file. The photo reminds me of a dulcimer kit that was available around that time. I can't remember the name of the manufacturer of the kit.

Ken

"The dulcimer sings a sweet song."

Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
6 months ago
1,835 posts

As Dusty says, nut/bridge material is up to you, the commercial ones today are usually Delrin(tm) or a harder plastic.  Most of us use a small triangular "jeweler's" file t\o cut string notches in the nut/bridge.  

Dusty Turtle
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
6 months ago
1,454 posts

Nuts and bridges can be made from hard woods, bone, or the hard plastic resins such as Bakelite.  Nowadays, the hard plastics used are usually Tusq, Nubone, or Micarta. Maybe there are some other proprietary names of which I am unaware.  In general, people assume bone to be the best, and it's probably the most expensive, but some of my dulcimers use other materials and I have no complaints.  

You might consider posting in the Dulcimer Making Group for specific advice about tools and materials.




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Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

As a musician, you have to keep one foot back in the past and one foot forward into the future.
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nik
@nik
6 months ago
3 posts

update, I cleaned it up a little bit and got new strings and it sounds pretty good.  intonation was way off with the old strings but spot on with the new.  funny how that happens-- my uke was like that too.

I have a question though about the nut/bridge-- do people use bone in dulcimers or is plastic the norm?  this one appears to have that old dark brown pre-plastic material they called bakelite-- was that used in the 70s?  or is this stuff just weird plastic or even wood or something?  

I also need to lower the action quite a bit-- the strings are a good 4-5mm from the frets.  the new strings cut into my fingers last night. lol.  any preferences for nut files or do people just use guitar files?  

Nathina
Nathina
@nathina
6 months ago
187 posts

No not one of hers.

Nathina
Nathina
@nathina
6 months ago
187 posts

Probably way off with this, but David Crosby of Crobsy Stills and Nash? This luthier made some for him. https://lapidusmusic.com/bio

Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
6 months ago
1,835 posts

Hi nik;  

I've not heard of David Cosby as a builder, but it appears that this was his second dulcimer build (#2), back in 1978. 

A series of wide and close up photos may help use better identify things.

nik
@nik
6 months ago
3 posts

hi all, newbie to dulcimers here but I have a lot of other stringed instruments.  just picked up a dulcimer with a label inside that says "David Crosby, #2, studio three, 12/21/78, 528 state street madison WI" with a signature (that does not match CSNY's david crosby's autograph fwiw).  does anyone know anything about this luthier?  you can imagine what I get if I google David Crosby, lol.  it's an hourglass shape, 4 string, heart shaped soundholes, caspari type tuning pegs I think (maybe schaller?), pretty rough carved scroll, 6.5 fret is present.  I can post pictures tomorrow if they would help.  Thanks!