The Kitchen Sink - talk about food

Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
6 years ago
1,460 posts

I love fish pie in a lot of variants, but Stargazy Pie just doesn't do it for meTongue.gifGrin.gif

I made a fish pie a week or so back as the second entree for a Burns Night party for 16 people. I used 1 lb salmon, 1 lb tilapia and 1 lb catfish, with onion and other mixed veg and lots of fresh dill in a creamy sauce, topped with puff pastry. First entree was my Faux Haggis (think lamb meatloaf with onion, steel cut oats and nutmeg, poached in broth, not baked). Also had Rumbledethumps and Oatcakes with fresh Marmalade (not the stuff from a jar) made in just 10 minutes.

Really enjoyed The King's Speech. It has been nominated for a grundle of awards!

John Henry
@john-henry
6 years ago
337 posts

Even minced ! sorry,

JH
John Henry said:

LOL, sorry Todd!!! Thanks for your reply, and of course, it is possible to obtain pasties almost anywhere in the UK these days, tho' rarely with nicely distinguished individual 'chunks' in the filling, more usually it will be some form of minched up mush, the results of mass produced fast food manufacturer. How about a chunk of 'Stargazy Pie' instead?

best wishes

JohnH

JohnHTodd Willsey said:

Oh dear, I reassigned the heritage of pasties to Wales. Cornish pasties it is, oggies it was and will always be. I never let facts get in the way of a good tale, especially regarding food. We who are anglophiles must check facts and any corrections from our UK and commonwealth friends are most welcome.

Had a movie date with my wife on Saturday, THE KINGS SPEECH. Enjoyed it much. The message of overcoming fear to do what we were meant for will resonate with people.


John Henry
@john-henry
6 years ago
337 posts

LOL, sorry Todd!!! Thanks for your reply, and of course, it is possible to obtain pasties almost anywhere in the UK these days, tho' rarely with nicely distinguished individual 'chunks' in the filling, more usually it will be some form of minched up mush, the results of mass produced fast food manufacturer. How about a chunk of 'Stargazy Pie' instead?

best wishes

JohnH

JohnHTodd Willsey said:

Oh dear, I reassigned the heritage of pasties to Wales. Cornish pasties it is, oggies it was and will always be. I never let facts get in the way of a good tale, especially regarding food. We who are anglophiles must check facts and any corrections from our UK and commonwealth friends are most welcome.

Had a movie date with my wife on Saturday, THE KINGS SPEECH. Enjoyed it much. The message of overcoming fear to do what we were meant for will resonate with people.

John Henry
@john-henry
6 years ago
337 posts

Hi Todd, over here pasties are usually associated with Cornwall, the extreme S/W tip of England, historicaly an economicaly poor area surrounded on three sides by the sea, a county many of whose residents regard themselves as not being English, but Cornish, and who are still trying to promote their own separate language. In that language is found the word 'Hoggin' from which is derived 'oggy', the local name for short crust pastry with a little meat, but mostly onion, swede, turnip and potatoe at one end, and a sweet filling at the other, often jam of some description. It traditionaly had a 'thick crust' because as you indicate, lack of washing falcilities underground dictated that you ate down to the crust then chucked it. When I was young and worked on constuction sites my mother often made 'Cornish' pasties for my lunch, for the same reasons, no use of a canteen or hot water to wash your hands with. A gent named Cyril Tawney wrote a song called 'The Oggie Man' !
Todd Willsey said:

Ken, you mean pasties with 'afters' I think. We haven't taken ourselves to that level of Welsh cuisine yet. The throwaway crust is only for those who believe in feeding the tommyknockers. They also knew that the dust in the tin mines was not good to ingest with arsenic in it so the miners were more that willing to toss them down. Miners used to hear the groans and pops in the mine framing and walls and some said it was the ghosts of dead miners warning them to watch for cave ins. Tradition was to toss them some crusts to keep in their good graces. To me that amounts to a lot of spirit hoodoo and there's only one spirit I believe in, one part of the Trinity that is. Lots of respect to miners though, dangerous business.

Had ourselves some college kids and other folks from church to supper on Friday night and played MadGab until late. Had smoked pork shoulder roast. Worked a dry rub into it and did the smoke phase on Thurs. evening. Finished roasting it Friday afternoon. Smoke ring was nice in the meat. Yummy and messy. Coleslaw and chips on the side with brownies for dessert.

Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
6 years ago
1,460 posts

I've made the throwaway crust style, but prefer and edible crust.

Those throwaway crusts are prohibited by the Geneva Convention, you know. The Welsh regiments used them as lethal weapons!!Grin.gif

John Henry
@john-henry
6 years ago
337 posts

Hi Ken, re miners pasty, do you do 'em with the throwaway crust ? There's not so many Brits these days who relate to packed lunches suitable for use down a tin mine !

best wishes

JohnHKen Hulme said:

Lisa, that jelly looks scrumptuous!! It's good to know there are still folks who make savory jellies, not just sweet ones. What's the base that gives it that broth color?

Todd - One lonely rutabaga? How sad... I make pasties several times a year, including the "miner's dinner" version with savory meat & veg at one end and sweet fruit in the other!

Strumelia
@strumelia
6 years ago
1,763 posts
Hi Ken, thanks. The peeled garlic is sort of ivory colored, so once it got blended and then boiled with rosemary, sugar, and white vinegar, it was a semi-clear light golden color. Maybe the rosemary helped tint it? I think if you boiled a bunch of fresh rosemary in hot water it might turn a bit golden. There is a lot of creamy garlic 'mash' and little garlic pieces suspended in the jelly.


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Those irritated by grain of sand best avoid beach.
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Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
6 years ago
1,460 posts

Lisa, that jelly looks scrumptuous!! It's good to know there are still folks who make savory jellies, not just sweet ones. What's the base that gives it that broth color?

Todd - One lonely rutabaga? How sad... I make pasties several times a year, including the "miner's dinner" version with savory meat & veg at one end and sweet fruit in the other!

Strumelia
@strumelia
6 years ago
1,763 posts

This week i made twenty-two 8 oz. jars of garlic-rosemary jelly. I like to have it with roast chicken, roast pork or lamb, and chops. MMmmmmm....now I have about a 2 year supply!




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Site Owner

Those irritated by grain of sand best avoid beach.
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Strumelia
@strumelia
7 years ago
1,763 posts
Making APPLE SAUCE on Halloween...
If you click on these photos, you will see them much larger. :)


We made apple sauce all day on Halloween this year. We bought a full bushel of Jona Gold apples at a local orchard and set up our kitchen assembly line. Brian peeled and cored the apples on our little hand crank coring machine, and he got each big pot of apples cooking- stirring, adding about 1/2 to one cup of water, and a few dashes of cinammon.

My job was to fill the sterilized pint jars with the finished apple sauce, process the jars in the boiling canning bath for 15 minutes, then give the lids a final tightening and let cool, making sure they sealed properly. I like to hear the little metallic "ping!" of each lid as its vacuum dimple pops in while the jars cool in stacks on the kitchen table. I think of it as little temple bells ringing.
One bushel yielded 38 pints (19 quarts) of really good apple sauce. We figure if we eat an average of one pint per week (and don't give away more than a couple of jars), this will last us into next June, when fresh fruit will again be available locally.




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Site Owner

Those irritated by grain of sand best avoid beach.
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Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
I actually have put together a Kilted Cook Book over last last week or so. I have it as a .PDF that's going on a CD. A gift to the first of my nieces & nephews to get married. Next week I'm going to Toledo, OH for a few days for the wedding. My niece is getting married to a fella of Scottish ancestry and she requested I wear my kilt!This happens to be the last recipe in the book, for some reason. If you love Chantrelle mushrooms and Brie cheese, this will knock your proverbial socks off.Pizza ProvenalClassic provincial French bread - Fougasse - with traditional toppings, cooked in an Italian manner. I came up with this as an entry in an Isle de France Cheese recipe contest. Didn't win anything significant, but that's OK. I got to eat the experiment, and It Was Good!12 oz. Bread Flour1 packet Rapid Rise YeastA pinch of sugar8 oz. Chantrelle mushrooms, sliced8 oz. Ile de France Brie, sliced with rind in place (I like the rind, take it off if you don't)2-3 tablespoons Olive Oil2 tablespoons Butter, unsalted1-2 tablespoons Herbs de ProvenceDissolve yeast in a few spoonfuls of warm water; add 3 Tbsp flour and a pinch of sugar; mix well to form a soft smooth starter. Form the starter into a ball, cover with cloth and rise in a warm draft-free place for 30 minutes (I use the inside of my microwave).Put the rest of the flour on a work surface and form a well in the center. Add the yeast starter, salt, oil and enough water to make a workable dough. Knead into a ball, place in a bowl, cover and let rise for 30 minutes.Roll the dough into a rectangle to fit a lubed baking sheet. Once the dough is spread out, slash the surface of bread in the traditional herringbone or leaf vein pattern. If you cut all the way through to the pan, it's OK. Sprinkle the dough with the Herbs de Provence. Arrange the cheese and mushroom slices on the surface. Bake in a preheated 450-500F oven 15-20 minutes until GB&D. Rest 10 minutes before serving.

Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
7 years ago
886 posts
I had never thought of sticking whole cloves into a salmon steak before, though I've done that with pork. Years ago I used to make a dill-infused butter specifically for seafood. It's been a while; maybe I should try that again.The Honduran tamales are steamed. They are much larger than Mexican tamales (but not as large as your Oaxacan tamales) and my mother-in-law also puts in what I consider odd ingredients, such as dates, raisins, olives, carrots and potatoes along with the chicken or pork. The last time we made a batch I made a few with crabmeat and corn, which tasted great with a green tomatillo sauce. The corn kernels added a nice contrast to the texture of crabmeat and masa. The hardest part about the tamales is actually wrapping them up in a uniform manner. They seem to taste great with almost anything you put inside.Your two-foot long zacahuile would be quite a sight! I'll have to tell my mother-in-law about those.I'm waiting for the Honduran cookbook to arrive. I'll write up a mini-review when it does.Ken Hulme said:
Awwww, man! I love wild sockeye! Orange sesame oil sounds about right; although I like both sticking a steak with whole cloves before grilling; or dusting with dill as well.

Are Honduran tamales steamed, or baked? Since we have banana leaves everywhere here, I make the Oaxacan style giant baked tamales (6" diameter x 2+ ft long) called zacahuile.



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Dusty T., Northern California
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"A good song makes you laugh, it makes you cry, it makes you think."
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Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
Awwww, man! I love wild sockeye! Orange sesame oil sounds about right; although I like both sticking a steak with whole cloves before grilling; or dusting with dill as well.Are Honduran tamales steamed, or baked? Since we have banana leaves everywhere here, I make the Oaxacan style giant baked tamales (6" diameter x 2+ ft long) called zacahuile.
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
7 years ago
886 posts
Thanks, for your efforts, Folkfan.I had indeed spent a lot of time searching the web and never found a Honduran cookbook, though you might have noticed that Ken H did indeed find me one. I like your idea of making one of my own. The fact is that my mother-in-law isn't quite as coherent as she once was, so she can't really follow a recipe. Finding a Honduran cookbook was really just a way to show her that we value her background.I've ordered the bilingual cookbook Ken H found and hopefully we'll have some nice family moments recreating some of those recipes. I think I mentioned elsewhere that around the holidays we all make Honduran tamales together (they are larger than Mexican tamales and wrapped in banana leaves instead of corn husks). Maybe we'll be able to add some other Honduran recipes to that festivity.With my wife's mother from Honduras, her father from Colombia but of Lebanese descent, my mother of Ashkenazi Jewish heritage, and my father of Scots Presbyterian/French Huguenot stock, we can spend all our time trying to honor the various ethnicities, cultures, and religions that represent our ancestry and never really satisfy everyone. Maybe we'll just develop some kind of family gumbo that has a little of everything.folkfan said:
DT, I didn't find a cookbook exactly, but when I googled Honduran food recipes I came up with several thousand hits. How about browsing some of the different sites which frequently give you the option to do a special Print copy. You could come up with foods from Appetizers to Desserts and copy them off, add family pictures, and make up a notebook cookbook. Your mother in law could be encouraged to write down her own recipes and you could add pictures of her working them up. It would then truly be a family heirloom. Plus you could put all the recipes into those plastic notebook cover sheets and make it a wipe off the splatters cookbook.

Dusty Turtle said:
Speaking of cookbooks, has anyone come across a Honduran cookbook? Perhaps even a Central American cookbook?

Several years ago I bought my wife an expensive and beautifully produced cookbook entitled The Taste of Colombia. She was really excited, as was her Colombian father. But her Honduran mother then replied, "Well now you should find her a Honduran cookbook, too." As silly as it seems, she really felt that her side of the family was being ignored.

But I have been unsuccessful at placating my mother-in-law by fulfilling her request. A Honduran cookbook? I am afraid there is no such beast.




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Dusty T., Northern California
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"A good song makes you laugh, it makes you cry, it makes you think."
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Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
7 years ago
886 posts
Given the continuous pouring of oil into the Gulf, you might want to come this way just to get some fresh seafood.I just bought several pounds of wild sockeye salmon that was caught up north of here. The flesh of the fish is unbelievably dark red. My plan tomorrow is to drizzle some with an orange sesame sauce, wrap it in foil, and grill it. Add some wild rice, a jicama/cucumber salad with fresh dill, and a chilled bottle of white, and we'll enjoy a nice summertime meal! On the 4th, I'll probably grill some to serve with a mango salsa. I'll save you some leftovers, Ken.Ken Hulme said:
If I ever get out to the"other" West Coast, I'll take you up on that!



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Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

"A good song makes you laugh, it makes you cry, it makes you think."
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folkfan
@folkfan
7 years ago
456 posts
DT, I didn't find a cookbook exactly, but when I googled Honduran food recipes I came up with several thousand hits. How about browsing some of the different sites which frequently give you the option to do a special Print copy. You could come up with foods from Appetizers to Desserts and copy them off, add family pictures, and make up a notebook cookbook. Your mother in law could be encouraged to write down her own recipes and you could add pictures of her working them up. It would then truly be a family heirloom. Plus you could put all the recipes into those plastic notebook cover sheets and make it a wipe off the splatters cookbook.Dusty Turtle said:
Speaking of cookbooks, has anyone come across a Honduran cookbook? Perhaps even a Central American cookbook?

Several years ago I bought my wife an expensive and beautifully produced cookbook entitled The Taste of Colombia. She was really excited, as was her Colombian father. But her Honduran mother then replied, "Well now you should find her a Honduran cookbook, too." As silly as it seems, she really felt that her side of the family was being ignored.

But I have been unsuccessful at placating my mother-in-law by fulfilling her request. A Honduran cookbook? I am afraid there is no such beast.
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
If I ever get out to the"other" West Coast, I'll take you up on that!
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
7 years ago
886 posts
Wow, Ken, I can't thank you enough. I've searched online and never found that book (or any other Honduran cookbook). That one seems like it is truly an informative resource. I'm about to order a copy.I don't know how to thank you other than cooking you some Honduran food should you ever make it out to northern California.Thanks so much.Ken Hulme said:
Ah, but the beast just lieth in hiding! I discovered that there was the definitive Honduran cookbook written in 1997 and a second edition produced in 2002. It is 312 pages of bi-lingual, Honduran Spanish and English recipes, food history and more.



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Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

"A good song makes you laugh, it makes you cry, it makes you think."
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Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
Ah, but the beast just lieth in hiding! I discovered that there was the definitive Honduran cookbook written in 1997 and a second edition produced in 2002. It is 312 pages of bi-lingual, Honduran Spanish and English recipes, food history and more. Below is a review written for the release of the Second Edition.There is one spiral bound copy on Amazon right now for $42; the others run from $95 to over $200!!There are undoubtedly other sources from which to obtain the book, but my Spanglish isn't good enough to search them out..."In 1997, Valentina Zaldivar de Farach published the first edition of the book titled: The Honduran Cookbook or El Cocinero Hondureno. The book is a bilingual, historic compilation of valuable information in regards to the way Hondurans cook today as a result of their roots, the influence of the Spanish conquerors and of the various groups of immigrants that came to this land at different times. With this book, Valentina has filled an enormous emptiness within Honduran literature, as she skillfully distinguishes the culinary elements brought by the Indians, the Spanish and the combination of the two, which lead to the birth of Honduran Creole food. She refers to the contribution of Africans from the middle of the 16th century, the Garifuna in the 18th century, and of the Arabian, Italian and Chinese immigrants throughout the Republican life of Honduras, says national historian Mario Martinez Castillo.Indeed, Valentina provides readers with a range of contemporary creole recipes classified according to the one element they are based on: corn, rice and beans, meat, vegetables or tropical fruits. Meanwhile, she added a list of dishes that are specially made on holidays, delicacies from the coast and island regions.Microbiology, dietary values and tipsBut more than offering a collection of delightful recipes, The Honduran Cookbook dedicates several pages to educate the reader on local culinary techniques such as making tortillas that include colorful illustrations that make it easier for you to learn.It is also important to notice that each recipe comes with its respective nutritional values, such as the amount of calories, cholesterol, proteins, fat, fiber and vitamins per serving. In fact, the chapter titled Nutritional Guidelines, presents a large list of food products with their respective nutritional value per 100 grams.But the author goes even further in her research, by introducing the world of food microbiology, as it incorporates updated advances on freezing techniques for popular consumer products and prepared dishes.From corn cream, chilate, and rice with crawfish, to eggplant antipasto, mondongo soup and roasted pork with guaro, this 312 page long book will enrich any daily menu with the most representative, tastier dishes of this country.About the authorValentina Zaldivar de Farach is a Honduran Microbiology professional with wide academic experience as university teacher. Back in the eighties, she directed the Extension Department of the National Autonomous University of Honduras (UNAH), where she performed a remarkable job aimed at rescuing Honduran values, and conceived the project of a literary work aimed at promoting the local culinary culture in a complete way.While living in the United States when her husband Wadi Farach was assigned to the San Francisco Consulate, she was amazed to realize how much this kind of information was sought, but not available.With the advice and help of national and foreign experts in health, nutrition, research and other related matters, she finally was able to print her unique English-Spanish book for the first time in 1997. The 2002 edition presents visual improvements, with the added value of a useful chapter about food conservation.The books cover presents a cutlery set drawn with figures evoking the multicultural influences and natural elements referred to inside. A corn husk, a Mayan face and even the leaning tower of Pisa, Italy are represented in this black and white work of art by Honduran Rafael Caceres, whose other beautiful drawings can be seen throughout the book.This publication intends to serve as an instrument to strengthen the national identity of Honduras, says the author modestly, who invited HTW readers to acquire The Honduran Cookbook at bookstores, and become part of this rich, tasty experience.
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
7 years ago
886 posts
Speaking of cookbooks, has anyone come across a Honduran cookbook? Perhaps even a Central American cookbook?Several years ago I bought my wife an expensive and beautifully produced cookbook entitled The Taste of Colombia. She was really excited, as was her Colombian father. But her Honduran mother then replied, "Well now you should find her a Honduran cookbook, too." As silly as it seems, she really felt that her side of the family was being ignored.But I have been unsuccessful at placating my mother-in-law by fulfilling her request. A Honduran cookbook? I am afraid there is no such beast.


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Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

"A good song makes you laugh, it makes you cry, it makes you think."
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Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
7 years ago
886 posts
Ken, I agree Lisa has a knack. In particular, her photos of her garden and fresh veggies are just beautiful. Perhaps you could collaborate on something like From the Garden to the Table where each recipe would highlight a particular garden crop, with a photo of the veggie fresh picked and then another photo of a dish fully plated.I watched you on the Food Network competition and was really impressed. I haven't made them yet, but I downloaded the recipes for the Spice Islands Salad and Shrimp & Pork meatballs, which I keep in a file entitled "Uncontrite Modal Recipes."Ken Hulme said:
Thanks DT;

I was actually moderately serious. Lisa takes beautiful food photos, and a collaboration could produce a really great project whether aimed at the dulcimer community or the world at large.

I have written and self-published a couple of cookbooks in the past. Those were without photos although I did have illustrations in one of them. No matter how good the recipes are, what really sells a cookbook today are the photos. But that is also the mega-expensive part of publishing a book - quality color photo reproduction. Self-publishing on-line; where the purchaser gets a .pdf or similar file would be the simplest, least expensive option. Electronic books are becoming all the rage.



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Dusty T., Northern California
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"A good song makes you laugh, it makes you cry, it makes you think."
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Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
Thanks DT;I was actually moderately serious. Lisa takes beautiful food photos, and a collaboration could produce a really great project whether aimed at the dulcimer community or the world at large.I have written and self-published a couple of cookbooks in the past. Those were without photos although I did have illustrations in one of them. No matter how good the recipes are, what really sells a cookbook today are the photos. But that is also the mega-expensive part of publishing a book - quality color photo reproduction. Self-publishing on-line; where the purchaser gets a .pdf or similar file would be the simplest, least expensive option. Electronic books are becoming all the rage.
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
7 years ago
886 posts
Ken, I don't know how serious you were being with this comment, but I would strongly urge you to put a cookbook together. You obviously have a lot of recipes for a variety of different foods. You are already spending the time to write them out and describe them. And you have all sorts of tidbits about local history and culture to add to the recipes. And you have a knack not only for how to prepare the food, but how to present it as well. And the best news for marketing purposes is that you already have a small audience of dulcimer players who would buy a copy immediately.In short, the book is half-completed, you obviously enjoy the process, and there are many a hungry dulcimer players out there.Ken Hulme said:
Lisa - you and I need to collaborate on a cookbook. My recipes and your photos. Maybe a dulcimer-focused cookbook. I'm a trained photographer, but you have "the eye" for food photography!!

We could self-publish online with a paid download for the whole illustrated book.



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Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

"A good song makes you laugh, it makes you cry, it makes you think."
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Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
Ayup! You're the cover girl; not me... I used to have brains, but I took 'em out to wash, and can't remember where I left 'em!Look at the up side - you and Brian would get to cook and eat the dishes as well as photograph them...
Strumelia
@strumelia
7 years ago
1,763 posts
Ken Hulme said:
Lisa - you and I need to collaborate on a cookbook. My recipes and your photos. Maybe a dulcimer-focused cookbook. I'm a trained photographer, but you have "the eye" for food photography!!

Yeah, sort of like 'your brains and my looks'. lol!


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Site Owner

Those irritated by grain of sand best avoid beach.
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Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
Lisa - you and I need to collaborate on a cookbook. My recipes and your photos. Maybe a dulcimer-focused cookbook. I'm a trained photographer, but you have "the eye" for food photography!!We could self-publish online with a paid download for the whole illustrated book.
Strumelia
@strumelia
7 years ago
1,763 posts
We've been mostly eating various kinds of salads fresh from our garden this past month.Here was last night's dinner straight from the backyard, left to right: purple kohlrabi, romaine lettuce, scallions, and butterhead lettuce. I added some fresh mozarella slices, and dressing. Cold and crispy, nothing else was needed except the iced tea!




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Site Owner

Those irritated by grain of sand best avoid beach.
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Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
The pizza recipe sounds great, portabellos and salmon go together well, and I love smoked salmon on pizza. The cooking time seems a bit long though. It all depends on your oven, I suppose.That sorbet sounds fabulous. Gotta get a watermelon today and try it. My icecream maker is the "freeze the liner" kind rather than the ice and rock salt kind.If you like thin crust pizza, here's the best recipe I know:Thin Crust PizzaYield: 1 Pizza1 each .25 oz. pkt. Active Dry Yeast1/4 tsp. granulated sugar3/4 cup 110 degree water1-3/4 cups AP Flour1/2 tsp. saltCheeses and toppings of choice...Dissolve yeast and sugar in water; allow to rest for 8 minutes. In a separate bowl, combine flour and salt. Pour yeast mixture over flour mixture and mix well. Turn dough onto a floured surface and knead for 2 minutes. Working from the edges to the center, press dough into a 12" circle. Place on a lightly greased pizza pan and stretch dough to edges - less than 1/4 thick. Spread sauce and desired toppings. Bake in a 500 degree oven for 8-12 minutes, or until edges are golden. Dough will be firm and crispy, not soggy and soft like many other doughs.
B. Ross Ashley
@b-ross-ashley
7 years ago
58 posts
Watermelon SorbetI got this recipe from my friend the folksinger Eve Goldberg, who got it from her mother Ruth. I don't particularly like watermelon as is, but this works for me on a hot summer night.1 watermelon of your choice, relatively small, 8 to 10 lbs.1 cup (roughly) of sugar, about 2 tbsp. per cup of watermelon juice, or to taste3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice, or more if you like1. Slice the watermelon in half and scoop the flesh out into a large bowl.2. Cut the flesh into pieces and put them into a blender or food processor (you will probably need to process in several batches); puree.3. Using a sieve, strain the seeds and pulp out of the watermelon puree and reserve the liquid. (Eve recommends straining even if you use seedless watermelon; it seems to shorten freezing time and makes the finished product smoother.)4. Add sugar and lemon juice to the watermelon juice and stir.5. Pour the juice into an ice cream maker and freeze according to the manufacturer's instructions. You'll need lots of ice (I'd get at least 20 pounds, to be safe) and some rock salt. It usually takes at least 20 minutes, but the freezing time is highly variable.IF you want to get really fancy you can section and freeze the watermelon rind, reassemble the sections, scoop the freshly-frozen sorbet into the shells with frozen wild blueberries for seeds, freeze overnight as a reassembled melon, slice along the section lines and serve the slices ...
B. Ross Ashley
@b-ross-ashley
7 years ago
58 posts
Smoked salmon ApizzaApizza, indigenous to the New Haven area of Connecticut, differs from the regular American-style pizza mainly in using no mozzarella.This uses a prepared crust ... yeah, I know, it's lazy ... but I'm not ready to essay a pizza crust yet!prebaked pizza crustolive oil, to condition crustfresh basil leavesportobello mushrooms, slicedsmoked salmon in 1X2 - inch piecesrehydrated sun-dried tomatoCondition the crust with olive oil. Layer the other ingredients on top. Bake 20 minutes at 450 F. Yum.
B. Ross Ashley
@b-ross-ashley
7 years ago
58 posts
Mmmmmm.Ken Hulme said:

Mandarin Orange Muffins
Although the recipe calls for canned mandarin oranges, you can also use fresh tangerine or clementine orange wedges, or even loquats for an equally tasty treat. I usually make a double batch, either as muffins, or baked in a 9x13 pan to make a fruited bread.


1 (11 ounce) can mandarin oranges
1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1-3/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon allspice
1/2 cup sugar
1/3 cup shortening
1 egg, slightly beaten
1/3 cup milk

Topping:
1/4 cup melted butter
1/4 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon


Preheat oven to 350F. Place muffin papers in muffin tins or spray tins with vegetable oil. Drain oranges and pat dry with paper towels. Set aside.

Whisk together flour, baking powder, salt, nutmeg, allspice, and sugar. Cut in shortening with a pastry blender or fork until mixture resembles coarse crumbs.

Whisk together egg and milk. Pour into flour mixture and stir with a fork just until combined. Do not over-mix. Carefully fold in mandarin oranges. Add a little extra water if the batter seems too stiff.

Fill muffin tins 3/4 full. Bake 20 to 25 minutes until centers test done and muffins are lightly golden. Alternately, spread mixture in a lubed 8x8 pan to make a fruit bread.

While muffins are baking, place melted butter in a small bowl. In another small bowl, whisk together sugar and cinnamon.

When muffins are done, dip each hot muffin first into the butter and then into the cinnamon sugar. For bread version, brush melted butter one top and sprinkle with cinnamon sugar. Let cool.

Yield: 12 large muffins or 24 mini-muffins.
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
Mandarin Orange MuffinsAlthough the recipe calls for canned mandarin oranges, you can also use fresh tangerine or clementine orange wedges, or even loquats for an equally tasty treat. I usually make a double batch, either as muffins, or baked in a 9x13 pan to make a fruited bread.1 (11 ounce) can mandarin oranges1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour1-3/4 teaspoon baking powder1/2 teaspoon salt1/4 teaspoon nutmeg1/4 teaspoon allspice1/2 cup sugar1/3 cup shortening1 egg, slightly beaten1/3 cup milkTopping:1/4 cup melted butter1/4 cup sugar1/2 teaspoon cinnamonPreheat oven to 350F. Place muffin papers in muffin tins or spray tins with vegetable oil. Drain oranges and pat dry with paper towels. Set aside.Whisk together flour, baking powder, salt, nutmeg, allspice, and sugar. Cut in shortening with a pastry blender or fork until mixture resembles coarse crumbs.Whisk together egg and milk. Pour into flour mixture and stir with a fork just until combined. Do not over-mix. Carefully fold in mandarin oranges. Add a little extra water if the batter seems too stiff.Fill muffin tins 3/4 full. Bake 20 to 25 minutes until centers test done and muffins are lightly golden. Alternately, spread mixture in a lubed 8x8 pan to make a fruit bread.While muffins are baking, place melted butter in a small bowl. In another small bowl, whisk together sugar and cinnamon.When muffins are done, dip each hot muffin first into the butter and then into the cinnamon sugar. For bread version, brush melted butter one top and sprinkle with cinnamon sugar. Let cool.Yield: 12 large muffins or 24 mini-muffins.
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
It's history in a nutshell! I'm a segregationist for initial plating, it's true. It's just prettier that way. But leftovers are unceremoniously dumped together.I've had Kentucky Hoppin Johns where rice was mixed with the beans, and then that served over a bed of rice with a side of tortillas! Costa Rican/Nicaraguan Gallo Pinto is usually integrated before the two components are finished cooking. In New Orleans you get Red Beans and Rice served both ways.Anyway you serve it, I don't think I've ever had a bad dish of beans & rice.
B. Ross Ashley
@b-ross-ashley
7 years ago
58 posts
Looks and sounds real good. I'm more used to Moros y Cristianos being mixed up together, though. Yours seems more like Hoppin' John, but with black beans.Ken Hulme said:
This week Ken's Kitchen is featuring Black Beans and Yellow Rice - not only a beautiful, but a tasty pairing. Cultures all over the world combine beans and rice. This is my take on Moros y Cristianos - the Cuban version. The Moors are the black beans... get it?

I use a pound of dried black beans. Don't bother to soak overnight; it makes virtually no difference in the cooking time - trust me.Pick them over real good so you're not cooking any rocks. Put them in a big pot with a couple quarts of water and a pound or so of smoked pig shank, neck bones or similar smoked pork. While that's coming to a rolling boil, dice up an onion, some celery and maybe a red bell pepper and add that to the pot.

Now add a little paprika, a tablespoon of dried thyme, and a touch of chile powder. Anytime you cook beans add thyme it's the perfect herb for any bean.

Reduce the heat and simmer for about two hours, until the beans are done and creamy textured.

While the beans are finishing, making a pot of long grain white rice - 1 cup rice and two cups water; bring to a boil and simmer 20 minutes (actually I use a rice cooker - best money I ever spent). No brown rice need apply. No short of medium grain rice, either. To that rice water add a Sazn Tropical packet.

Sazn is a brand of spice mixes found in the Mexican food section. Tropical is a particular blend of spice. Not hot at all, just wonderfully flavorful. Can't find Sazn? Use a teaspoon of turmeric and a 1/4 tsp each of onion, garlic and chile powder. As it cooks the rice absorbs those wonderful flavors and turns bright yellow.

When the beans are done, I strain out any leftover liquid. Then I pull the wonderful bits of meat off the bones and add that back into the beans. Plate a big scoop of rice, top with a scoop of beans, and you have a tasty, healthy dinner!

Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
This week Ken's Kitchen is featuring Black Beans and Yellow Rice - not only a beautiful, but a tasty pairing. Cultures all over the world combine beans and rice. This is my take on Moros y Cristianos - the Cuban version. The Moors are the black beans... get it?I use a pound of dried black beans. Don't bother to soak overnight; it makes virtually no difference in the cooking time - trust me.Pick them over real good so you're not cooking any rocks. Put them in a big pot with a couple quarts of water and a pound or so of smoked pig shank, neck bones or similar smoked pork. While that's coming to a rolling boil, dice up an onion, some celery and maybe a red bell pepper and add that to the pot.Now add a little paprika, a tablespoon of dried thyme, and a touch of chile powder. Anytime you cook beans add thyme it's the perfect herb for any bean.Reduce the heat and simmer for about two hours, until the beans are done and creamy textured.While the beans are finishing, making a pot of long grain white rice - 1 cup rice and two cups water; bring to a boil and simmer 20 minutes (actually I use a rice cooker - best money I ever spent). No brown rice need apply. No short of medium grain rice, either. To that rice water add a Sazn Tropical packet.Sazn is a brand of spice mixes found in the Mexican food section. Tropical is a particular blend of spice. Not hot at all, just wonderfully flavorful. Can't find Sazn? Use a teaspoon of turmeric and a 1/4 tsp each of onion, garlic and chile powder. As it cooks the rice absorbs those wonderful flavors and turns bright yellow.When the beans are done, I strain out any leftover liquid. Then I pull the wonderful bits of meat off the bones and add that back into the beans. Plate a big scoop of rice, top with a scoop of beans, and you have a tasty, healthy dinner!

Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
I make clafouti with all sorts of fruits - fresh or frozen. Mango is good; so is Loquat. All the berries. Have not tried citrus, although mandarin orange/tangerine/Clementines would probably be really good. Diced apple or pear might be good too...
Jim Fawcett
@jim-fawcett
7 years ago
137 posts
Ken, that looks mighty good. Think I'm gonna have to try this.Ken Hulme said:
Blueberry Clafouti

Traditionally a French dessert using cherries, clafouti [Klah-foo-tea] is neither a fruit-filled pancake; nor a fruity egg custard but half way between. It is a very easy and healthier alternative to berry pie.

Cooking Spray or Butter for the pan
16 ounces fresh Blueberries, Black Berries, or Red Raspberries*, drained
3 large eggs
1/3 cup sugar
3/4 cup whole milk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon cinnamon

Preheat oven to 400F. Spray or butter the bottom and sides of a 12 cast iron skillet**. Spread the fruit to cover the entire bottom of the skillet.

Whisk together the eggs and sugar until frothy and lighter in color. Add the milk, vanilla and flour, and whisk to combine. Pour the batter over the fruit.

Bake on the middle rack, uncovered, for 30 minutes or until golden brown and a knife comes out clean when inserted in the middle. Remove from oven and dust with cinnamon while still warm and soft.

Cool for 30 minutes before removing from the skillet, slicing and serving. Serves 4-6.


* Wrong season for fresh berries? Use frozen berries thawed in a colander and discard the juice.

** Dont have a cast iron skillet? Any 10-12 oven-safe skillet will do. If all else fails, use a large pie pan. Do Not use a plastic-handled or non-stick lined skillet, as they can produce unhealthy vapors at oven temperatures and cooking times.




--
Site Moderator
Robin Thompson
@robin-thompson
7 years ago
872 posts
Ken, that's almost too pretty to eat. I might try this after berries come on this summer. Thanks!


--
Robin T
one of the Moderators here :)
Keep a song in your heart!
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
Blueberry ClafoutiTraditionally a French dessert using cherries, clafouti [Klah-foo-tea] is neither a fruit-filled pancake; nor a fruity egg custard but half way between. It is a very easy and healthier alternative to berry pie.Cooking Spray or Butter for the pan16 ounces fresh Blueberries, Black Berries, or Red Raspberries*, drained3 large eggs1/3 cup sugar3/4 cup whole milk1 teaspoon vanilla extract3/4 cup all-purpose flour1 teaspoon cinnamonPreheat oven to 400F. Spray or butter the bottom and sides of a 12 cast iron skillet**. Spread the fruit to cover the entire bottom of the skillet.Whisk together the eggs and sugar until frothy and lighter in color. Add the milk, vanilla and flour, and whisk to combine. Pour the batter over the fruit.Bake on the middle rack, uncovered, for 30 minutes or until golden brown and a knife comes out clean when inserted in the middle. Remove from oven and dust with cinnamon while still warm and soft.Cool for 30 minutes before removing from the skillet, slicing and serving. Serves 4-6.* Wrong season for fresh berries? Use frozen berries thawed in a colander and discard the juice.** Dont have a cast iron skillet? Any 10-12 oven-safe skillet will do. If all else fails, use a large pie pan. Do Not use a plastic-handled or non-stick lined skillet, as they can produce unhealthy vapors at oven temperatures and cooking times.

Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
I dunno Ross. I see lots of German places serving both sauerkraut and rotekohl on the same plate. I think chicken and rotekohl would be good cooked together.BTW - Caster sugar, for the Americans who don't know, is "ultrafine" - much smaller grains than regular white sugar. You can buy it in the grocery store. If all you have is regular sugar, ut 1-1/2 cups in a food processor, and give it a whirrr for 3-4 minutes. Then weigh out 300 grams (weighing is much more accurate for baking...).
B. Ross Ashley
@b-ross-ashley
7 years ago
58 posts
Here's a contribution to the recipe collection, passed on from an Aussie science-fiction fan on the Lois-Bujold listserv:Killer Chocolate Thingies300 grams ground walnuts300 grams caster sugar9 egg whites9 egg yolks300 grams powdered sugar200 grams butter2 tablespoons cornstarch200 grams chocolateCrust: Beat the egg whites, add the caster sugar, beat till shiny and stiff. Fold in the walnuts. Line 2 40 x 30 cm tins with baking paper. Pre-heat the oven to 170C. Divide the mixture into the tins and bake until just set (check with a toothpick after about 10 minutes.)Filling: Beat the egg yolks with powdered sugar, butter, cornstarch and chocolate and cook over a pot of simmering water in a double boiler for about half an hour. Leave covered to cool a bit.Assembly: Put the cake together while the filling is still lukewarm: crust-filling-crust-filling. When completely cooled, cut in small pieces.Conversions of weights and temperatures are left as an exercise for the cook. Grin.gif
B. Ross Ashley
@b-ross-ashley
7 years ago
58 posts
The slaw seems superfluous, given the sauerkraut.Wonder how this would come out with German sweet pickled red cabbage, aka rotekohl? And green peppers are unripe peppers, I'd wanna use orange or yellow Bells. I'd be tempted to flatten the thighs and serve it on slices of a good medium rye bread, e.g. a Munchner-style.Ken Hulme said:

Reuben-esque Thighs
6 Boneless, skinless chicken thighs 1 lb Sauerkraut (drained)1 Green Bell Pepper, sliced thin2 Tbsp White Wine (or water)1 Tbsp Brown Sugar1 Tsp Caraway Seed6 Tbsp Thousand Island Dressing3 slices Swiss Cheese, cut into stripsBrine the thighs 30-45 minutes. Drain, Pat dry. Spray or oil 12 non-stick skillet. Heat to med-high. Brown meat on both sides, 5-7 minutes per side. Remove from skillet. Add sauerkraut, green pepper, wine, sugar caraway and 2 Tbsp dressing. Top with thighs. Reduce heat to a simmer, cover and cook 25-30 minutes. Spoon remaining dressing over chicken and top chicken with cheese strips. Cover and cook another 2-3 minutes until the cheese melts.Serve with:Grilled Cole Slaw1 head Red Cabbage, cored and cut into 8 wedges3 Tbsp Olive oil, for brushing4-1/2 Tbsp Mayonnaise4-1/2 Tbsp Cider Vinegar3 Pickled Peppers (jalapeo, banana, or Italian) seeded and minced2 tsp Pickling Liquid from the pepper jarSalt & Pepper to tastePreheat the grill. Dont want to fire the grill? Use your ovens broiler with the rack set to the highest mark.Brush cabbage wedges with oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Grill cabbage until it starts to char and blacken - about 3 minutes per side. Transfer to a work surface. When the cabbage is cool enough to handle, finely slice it crosswise with a sharp knife.Whisk together the mayonnaise, cider vinegar, and pickling liquid. Toss with the shredded cabbage. Season with salt and pepper and toss again.
Robin Thompson
@robin-thompson
7 years ago
872 posts
The cabbage wedges wouldn't make it past the grilling stage with me.Smile.gifKen Hulme said:
They are easy to do and so good tasting!

So... When are you serving them??? Enquiring minds and all that...



--
Robin T
one of the Moderators here :)
Keep a song in your heart!
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
They are easy to do and so good tasting!So... When are you serving them??? Enquiring minds and all that...
Robin Thompson
@robin-thompson
7 years ago
872 posts
Ken, those recipes are mouth-watering. Grin.gif


--
Robin T
one of the Moderators here :)
Keep a song in your heart!
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
Reuben-esque Thighs6 Boneless, skinless chicken thighs1 lb Sauerkraut (drained)1 Green Bell Pepper, sliced thin2 Tbsp White Wine (or water)1 Tbsp Brown Sugar1 Tsp Caraway Seed6 Tbsp Thousand Island Dressing3 slices Swiss Cheese, cut into stripsBrine the thighs 30-45 minutes. Drain, Pat dry. Spray or oil 12 non-stick skillet. Heat to med-high. Brown meat on both sides, 5-7 minutes per side. Remove from skillet. Add sauerkraut, green pepper, wine, sugar caraway and 2 Tbsp dressing. Top with thighs. Reduce heat to a simmer, cover and cook 25-30 minutes. Spoon remaining dressing over chicken and top chicken with cheese strips. Cover and cook another 2-3 minutes until the cheese melts.Serve with:Grilled Cole Slaw1 head Red Cabbage, cored and cut into 8 wedges3 Tbsp Olive oil, for brushing4-1/2 Tbsp Mayonnaise4-1/2 Tbsp Cider Vinegar3 Pickled Peppers (jalapeo, banana, or Italian) seeded and minced2 tsp Pickling Liquid from the pepper jarSalt & Pepper to tastePreheat the grill. Dont want to fire the grill? Use your ovens broiler with the rack set to the highest mark.Brush cabbage wedges with oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Grill cabbage until it starts to char and blacken - about 3 minutes per side. Transfer to a work surface. When the cabbage is cool enough to handle, finely slice it crosswise with a sharp knife.Whisk together the mayonnaise, cider vinegar, and pickling liquid. Toss with the shredded cabbage. Season with salt and pepper and toss again.
folkfan
@folkfan
7 years ago
456 posts
I'd have to leave off the shrimp too. But it does look like a delicious sandwich.Ken Hulme said:
Chourio or Chouriso is the Portuguese/Spanish spelling. It's a relatively 'hard' sausage. You can also use Andouille, the wonderful tangy Cajun sausage, or Linguisa.

Chorizo is the Mexican sausage, which is very loose and used more as a flavorant than a bite of protein. Start cooking slices of chorizo and it melts apart.

FF - you can make this with fried ring bologna and it would be pretty good too!
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
Chourio or Chouriso is the Portuguese/Spanish spelling. It's a relatively 'hard' sausage. You can also use Andouille, the wonderful tangy Cajun sausage, or Linguisa.Chorizo is the Mexican sausage, which is very loose and used more as a flavorant than a bite of protein. Start cooking slices of chorizo and it melts apart.FF - you can make this with fried ring bologna and it would be pretty good too!
folkfan
@folkfan
7 years ago
456 posts
Seems to be a bit of a difference between the Spanish sausage and the Portuguese version of these sausages.From Wikipedia:Spanish ChorizoSpanish chorizo is made from coarsely chopped pork and pork fat, seasoned with smoked pimentn (paprika) and salt. It is generally classed as either picante (spicy) or dulce (sweet), depending upon the type of smoked paprika used. There are hundreds of regional varieties of Spanish chorizo, both smoked and unsmoked, which may contain garlic, herbs and other ingredients.[2][3] Chorizo comes in short, long, hard and soft varieties, some of which are suited to being eaten as an appetizer or tapas, whereas others are better suited to cooking. Leaner varieties are typically better suited to tapas, eaten at room temperature, whereas fattier versions are generally used for cooking.[4] A general rule of thumb is that long, thin chorizos are sweeter and short chorizos are spicy, although this is not always the case.[5]Portuguese chourioPortuguese chourio is made with pork, fat, wine, paprika and salt. It is then stuffed into natural or artificial casings and slowly dried over smoke. There are many different varieties, changing in color, shape, seasoning and taste. Many dishes of Portuguese cuisine and Brazilian cuisine make use of chourio - Cozido portuguesa and Feijoada are just two of them.[citation needed]A popular way to prepare chourio is partially sliced and flame cooked over alcohol at the table. Special glazed earthenware dishes with a lattice top are used for this purpose.In Portugal there is also a blood chourio (chourio de sangue) very similar to the Black Pudding, amongst many other types of Enchidos, such as Alheira, Linguia, Morcela, Farinheira, Chourio de Vinho, Chourio de ossos, Cacholeira, Paia, Paio, Paiola, Paiote, Salpico and Tripa enfarinhada.B. Ross Ashley said:
Are those chorizos? Might be the same sausage, but I would like to make sure. (Should there be a cedilla under the c, as in chourio, I'd be more sure.)

B. Ross Ashley
@b-ross-ashley
7 years ago
58 posts
Are those chorizos? Might be the same sausage, but I would like to make sure. (Should there be a cedilla under the c, as in chourio, I'd be more sure.)Ken Hulme said:
Since "sumer is icumen in", I thought y'all might like to try this gourmet sandwich recipe for your next bike trip, boat ride, or day playing dulcimers in the park. I won first place in the Boating TV "Best Boating Sandwich" with this version of a Nawlins' Po Boy. Gaspar Sausage was the co-sponsor. I won 25 pounds of their very good chourico and linguisa. The chourico is nice for those who don't like much spice. You could also substitute any of the Hillshire Farms style ring sausages...

Shrimp & Chourico Submarine
The perfect boat sandwich is submarine of course. In this case a New Orleans style Po Boy sub with traditional hard crusty baguette bread, not a soft hoagie type roll. Hard crusty bread can stand more time at sea before becoming mushy and soft. Po Boys can be undressed or dressed.

Undressed:
1 fresh French Baguette, about 24 long
1/2 lb Shrimp, 16-20 count, peeled & deveined
1/2 lb Gaspar Chourico or Extra Hot Chourico
1 Tbsp Creole/Cajun spice blend, to taste
2 Tbsp Olive oil
1 Red Bell Pepper, cut into strips
3/4 cup Kalamata Olives, pitted (or regular pitted Black Olives)

Dressed:
All of the above, plus
1 large Dill Pickle sliced into thin strips
2-3 Roma Tomatoes, sliced into rounds
1-2 long leaves of fresh Romaine lettuce
1/4 Cup Mayonnaise mixed with 2 Tbsp Lime juice
1/2 Red Onion, sliced thin
Salt & Pepper to taste

Slice the bell pepper and roughly chop the olives. Set aside.

Slice the chourico diagonally to make long oval pieces about 1/8 thick. Saute the chourico in a splash of oil on medium heat to brown it and bring out the flavors. Remove from pan and reserve. Toss shrimp with spice blend and saute them in the same skillet, adding more oil if necessary. Cook just until the shrimp turn pink, remove from pan and cool.

To assemble the dressed sandwich:
Slice the baguette lengthwise, but leave it hinged. Brush the insides of the loaf with the lime-mayo. Fold the romaine leaves lengthwise along the center rib. Place in the baguette, with the lettuce ribs running along the bread hinge. Inside the folded lettuce, arrange slices of chourico, the shrimp and red pepper strips. Top with slices of tomato, pickle, onion and additional shredded romaine if desired. Add a dash of salt & pepper and serve.

Can be assembled and wrapped in plastic wrap ashore; or the individual components can be placed in zip top bags and stored in the cooler until lunch time, and then assembled. Serves 2-4 hungry boaters.

Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
Since "sumer is icumen in", I thought y'all might like to try this gourmet sandwich recipe for your next bike trip, boat ride, or day playing dulcimers in the park. I won first place in the Boating TV "Best Boating Sandwich" with this version of a Nawlins' Po Boy. Gaspar Sausage was the co-sponsor. I won 25 pounds of their very good chourico and linguisa. The chourico is nice for those who don't like much spice. You could also substitute any of the Hillshire Farms style ring sausages...Shrimp & Chourico SubmarineThe perfect boat sandwich is submarine of course. In this case a New Orleans style Po Boy sub with traditional hard crusty baguette bread, not a soft hoagie type roll. Hard crusty bread can stand more time at sea before becoming mushy and soft. Po Boys can be undressed or dressed.Undressed:1 fresh French Baguette, about 24 long1/2 lb Shrimp, 16-20 count, peeled & deveined1/2 lb Gaspar Chourico or Extra Hot Chourico1 Tbsp Creole/Cajun spice blend, to taste2 Tbsp Olive oil1 Red Bell Pepper, cut into strips3/4 cup Kalamata Olives, pitted (or regular pitted Black Olives)Dressed:All of the above, plus1 large Dill Pickle sliced into thin strips2-3 Roma Tomatoes, sliced into rounds1-2 long leaves of fresh Romaine lettuce1/4 Cup Mayonnaise mixed with 2 Tbsp Lime juice1/2 Red Onion, sliced thinSalt & Pepper to tasteSlice the bell pepper and roughly chop the olives. Set aside.Slice the chourico diagonally to make long oval pieces about 1/8 thick. Saute the chourico in a splash of oil on medium heat to brown it and bring out the flavors. Remove from pan and reserve. Toss shrimp with spice blend and saute them in the same skillet, adding more oil if necessary. Cook just until the shrimp turn pink, remove from pan and cool.To assemble the dressed sandwich:Slice the baguette lengthwise, but leave it hinged. Brush the insides of the loaf with the lime-mayo. Fold the romaine leaves lengthwise along the center rib. Place in the baguette, with the lettuce ribs running along the bread hinge. Inside the folded lettuce, arrange slices of chourico, the shrimp and red pepper strips. Top with slices of tomato, pickle, onion and additional shredded romaine if desired. Add a dash of salt & pepper and serve.Can be assembled and wrapped in plastic wrap ashore; or the individual components can be placed in zip top bags and stored in the cooler until lunch time, and then assembled. Serves 2-4 hungry boaters.

razyn
@razyn
7 years ago
113 posts
We tried your basic recipe last night, and enjoyed it. (Finished enjoying it today, actually.) Technically we didn't have Porcini mushrooms, but at least they were fresh ones -- of whatever generic species the grocery store had. I guess if I cared enough, I could have gone down to Dean & DeLuca, but I don't. Just wanted some chicken for dinner, basically. And it was quite yummy.
folkfan
@folkfan
7 years ago
456 posts
I've seen it done with the sliced mushrooms and some green onion, but not enough onion to hide the flavor of the Marsala. The bits of ham wouldn't be bad.Ken Hulme said:
Oops. My bad. Yes Porcini, if you can find them, or Crimini mushrooms, not proscuitto ham! I have seen Chicken Marsala with bits of proscuitto added for flavor...
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
Oops. My bad. Yes Porcini, if you can find them, or Crimini mushrooms, not proscuitto ham! I have seen Chicken Marsala with bits of proscuitto added for flavor...
folkfan
@folkfan
7 years ago
456 posts
Ken, did you mean porcini mushrooms rather than prosciutto ham?I like the idea of the cornstarch for thickening the sauce. It seems a shame to have a good sauce stay on the plate rather than stick to the fettucini that Chicken Marsala is frequently served with. The sauce last night separated and the butter floated about 1/4 thick over the entire plate. UGHKen Hulme said:
This is the basic Chicken Marsala recipe I've used for years. It uses 2 Tbsp of butter for flavor at the end. You don't really need it. This has a rather thin sauce, if you like it thicker add a bit of cornstarch slurry at the end and bring the sauce to a hard boil.
4 skinless, boneless, chicken breastsAll-purpose flour, for dredgingKosher salt and freshly ground black pepper1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil - use just enough to cover the bottom of your 12" skillet4 ounces prosciutto, thinly sliced3/4 cup Marsala wine1/2 cup chicken stock2 tablespoon unsalted butter1/4 cup chopped flat-leaf parsleyPut the chicken breasts side by side on a cutting board and lay a piece of plastic wrap over them. Pound with a flat meat mallet (or a short piece of 2x4), until they are about 1/4" thick. Put some flour in a shallow platter and season with a fair amount of salt and pepper; mix with a fork to distribute evenly.Heat the oil over medium-high in a 12" skillet. When the oil is nice and hot, dredge both sides of the chicken cutlets in the seasoned flour, shaking off the excess. Slip the cutlets into the pan and fry for 5 minutes on each side until golden, turning once do this in batches if the pieces don't all fit comfortably in the pan. Remove chicken to a platter in a single layer to keep warm.Lower the heat to medium and add the mushrooms. Saut until they are nicely browned, about 5 minutes; season with salt and pepper. Pour the Marsala in the pan and boil for a few seconds to cook out the alcohol. Add the chicken stock and simmer for a couple minutes to reduce the sauce slightly. Stir in the butter and return the chicken to the pan; simmer gently to heat the chicken through. Season with salt and pepper and garnish with chopped parsley before serving.
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
This is the basic Chicken Marsala recipe I've used for years. It uses 2 Tbsp of butter for flavor at the end. You don't really need it. This has a rather thin sauce, if you like it thicker add a bit of cornstarch slurry at the end and bring the sauce to a hard boil.4 skinless, boneless, chicken breastsAll-purpose flour, for dredgingKosher salt and freshly ground black pepper1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil - use just enough to cover the bottom of your 12" skillet4 ounces prosciutto, thinly sliced3/4 cup Marsala wine1/2 cup chicken stock2 tablespoon unsalted butter1/4 cup chopped flat-leaf parsleyPut the chicken breasts side by side on a cutting board and lay a piece of plastic wrap over them. Pound with a flat meat mallet (or a short piece of 2x4), until they are about 1/4" thick. Put some flour in a shallow platter and season with a fair amount of salt and pepper; mix with a fork to distribute evenly.Heat the oil over medium-high in a 12" skillet. When the oil is nice and hot, dredge both sides of the chicken cutlets in the seasoned flour, shaking off the excess. Slip the cutlets into the pan and fry for 5 minutes on each side until golden, turning once do this in batches if the pieces don't all fit comfortably in the pan. Remove chicken to a platter in a single layer to keep warm.Lower the heat to medium and add the mushrooms. Saut until they are nicely browned, about 5 minutes; season with salt and pepper. Pour the Marsala in the pan and boil for a few seconds to cook out the alcohol. Add the chicken stock and simmer for a couple minutes to reduce the sauce slightly. Stir in the butter and return the chicken to the pan; simmer gently to heat the chicken through. Season with salt and pepper and garnish with chopped parsley before serving.
folkfan
@folkfan
7 years ago
456 posts
Anyone have a good Chicken Marsala recipe that isn't heavy on the butter. Last night at a restaurant I ordered it with the request that the chef not use a lemon butter sauce as the base for the Chicken Marsala. The waitress said that he tended to be heavy handed with the lemon, and I've never had a Chicken Marsala that used lemon. Well he what did was make Grilled Lemon Chicken Breasts (Greek style HEAVY on the herb and over done on the fresh cracked pepper) rather than browning the chicken and braising it in the sauce.There was so much pepper that my mouth actually reacted with burning lips and corners and you could taste the sourness of the lemons. The plate was afloat with butter in a very thin sloppy sauce. And I kept wondering if the chef had used the Marsala wine at all. The strong herbs, lemon, and pepper on the grilled chicken absolutely overpowered the Marsala if he did use it. Probably the worst version of Chicken Marsala I've ever eaten. So does anyone have a less pungent version of this dish????
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
No reason you can't substitute breasts for thighs and just bake them in the marinade.I make Greek yogurt by draining; and also ,make Labneh "cream cheese" by draining full fat yogurt for a couple days until it's really thick! I season the top with toasted cumin seeds or dill weed. Makes a great cracker/ bread dip.Tilapia is a great dish - the "loves and fishes" fish also called Nile Perch. Try not to buy the frozen packages; they're assembled from the off cuts. Most groceries today carry fresh whole tilapia or half fish fillets by the pound. The original recipe called for Sea Bass, but even here that's spendy fish.If you've not tried it, Basa or Swai or Sutchi (same fish/different region is also very good. It's a mild Indonesian catfish.I don't think you'll find that a 1/2 teaspoon of red pepper flakes in nearly two cups of liquid is very spicy at all.
folkfan
@folkfan
7 years ago
456 posts
On the Tavuk Izgara, Ken. Do you think I might be able to substitute chicken breasts and bake them in the yogurt marinade? I don't have a broiler, though I've been thinking about getting a large toaster oven. I only cook for two and heating the big oven for one item is something I just hate to do. It's so big and usually the pan I put in it is so small. ;-)I've never fixed Talapia, but the recipe you posted sounds great. Red pepper flakes without the seeds shouldn't be as hot, I'll have to see about getting some.And Pico de Gallo is something both Larry and I love.I mentioned getting a carton of plain yogurt draining so I could make Tzatziki . He thought it was a great idea and immediately was wanting to go get Pita bread for dipping. We'd make a meal just on that and sliced tomatoes. Of course, American yogurt isn't as good as Greek for the dish, but I'll drain it over night through a clean cotton cloth and it will thicken up some.Ken Hulme said:

Tavuk Izgara -- Turkish Chicken Thighs

2 Tablespoons Cumin seeds
1 Onion, coarsely chopped
4 to 6 cloves Garlic, finely minced
1 Tablespoon Paprika
1 Lemon, juiced
1 cup plain Yogurt
12 boneless Chicken Thighs
Salt and freshly ground Black Pepper to taste
Lemon wedges for serving

Toast cumin seeds in a small pan over medium heat until the seeds are fragrant and start to pop. Remove from heat and grind in a spice or coffee grinder (or mortar & pestle).

Put cumin, onion, garlic, paprika, and lemon juice in a blender and pulse to liquify. Add the yogurt and pulse just until blended.

Put the thighs in a shallow non-aluminum baking dish or bowl. Pour the marinade over the chicken and toss well to coat. Let stand at room temperature at least 2 hours or cover and refrigerate overnight.

Preheat the broiler to its hottest setting. Place thighs on a wire rack inside a baking sheet; dust with salt and pepper. Broil or grill until the juices run clear, about 6 minutes per side, brushing with marinade. Serve hot with lemon wedges, couscous and brined eggplant and tomato kebabs.



Tilapia Cubano
Tilapia prepared Cuban style - with green olives, skillet poached in a white wine sauce.

4 large (4-6 oz) fillets Tilapia (or any white fish)
2 tablespoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil for frying (use water if concerned about fats)
1 Onion, thinly sliced
2-3 cloves Garlic, minced
4 fresh Garden Tomatoes, diced; or 1 can of Diced Tomatoes
1 cup White Wine (never cook with a wine you wouldn't drink)
1/2 cup pimento-stuffed Green Olives, chopped
3 tablespoons Capers, plus 1 tablespoon caper liquid
1/4 teaspoon Red Pepper Flakes
1 bunch Cilantro, chopped, to taste

Salt & pepper the tilapia to taste. In a large covered skillet, saute the onion & garlic for 2 minutes, to bring out the aromatics. Add the tomatoes, wine, olives, capers, and red pepper flakes. Simmer for 10-15 minutes to marry the flavors. Place the fish in the sauce. Cover, and simmer on medium low for 10-12 minutes until the fish flakes easily. Remove fish. Bring poaching liquid to a quick boil. Add cilantro to taste. If desired, add cornstarch slurry to thicken.

The side dish below is a quick Pico de Gallo of tomato, onion, cilantro and lime juice with a dusting of chile powder.

Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
Tavuk Izgara -- Turkish Chicken Thighs2 Tablespoons Cumin seeds1 Onion, coarsely chopped4 to 6 cloves Garlic, finely minced1 Tablespoon Paprika1 Lemon, juiced1 cup plain Yogurt12 boneless Chicken ThighsSalt and freshly ground Black Pepper to tasteLemon wedges for servingToast cumin seeds in a small pan over medium heat until the seeds are fragrant and start to pop. Remove from heat and grind in a spice or coffee grinder (or mortar & pestle).Put cumin, onion, garlic, paprika, and lemon juice in a blender and pulse to liquify. Add the yogurt and pulse just until blended.Put the thighs in a shallow non-aluminum baking dish or bowl. Pour the marinade over the chicken and toss well to coat. Let stand at room temperature at least 2 hours or cover and refrigerate overnight.Preheat the broiler to its hottest setting. Place thighs on a wire rack inside a baking sheet; dust with salt and pepper. Broil or grill until the juices run clear, about 6 minutes per side, brushing with marinade. Serve hot with lemon wedges, couscous and brined eggplant and tomato kebabs.Tilapia CubanoTilapia prepared Cuban style - with green olives, skillet poached in a white wine sauce.4 large (4-6 oz) fillets Tilapia (or any white fish)2 tablespoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil for frying (use water if concerned about fats)1 Onion, thinly sliced2-3 cloves Garlic, minced4 fresh Garden Tomatoes, diced; or 1 can of Diced Tomatoes1 cup White Wine (never cook with a wine you wouldn't drink)1/2 cup pimento-stuffed Green Olives, chopped3 tablespoons Capers, plus 1 tablespoon caper liquid1/4 teaspoon Red Pepper Flakes1 bunch Cilantro, chopped, to tasteSalt & pepper the tilapia to taste. In a large covered skillet, saute the onion & garlic for 2 minutes, to bring out the aromatics. Add the tomatoes, wine, olives, capers, and red pepper flakes. Simmer for 10-15 minutes to marry the flavors. Place the fish in the sauce. Cover, and simmer on medium low for 10-12 minutes until the fish flakes easily. Remove fish. Bring poaching liquid to a quick boil. Add cilantro to taste. If desired, add cornstarch slurry to thicken.The side dish below is a quick Pico de Gallo of tomato, onion, cilantro and lime juice with a dusting of chile powder.

Stephanie Stuckwisch
@stephanie-stuckwisch
7 years ago
61 posts
Thank you, thank you. It sounds wonderful. I'm heading down to the market tomorrow.Ken Hulme said:

Stephanie Stuckwisch said:
So, Ken, does this mean you might want to share your recipe for Tropical Shrimp salad you brought to one of the FOTMD celebration?


Do you mean my Basil-Mango Shrimp Cocktails?

That's easy:
6 or more raw shrimp per person, peeled, with tails left on
1 large mango, peeled and pitted
12 leaves of fresh Basil
Cajun/Creole Spice Blend, to taste
1 Tbsp Oil for frying.

Dust the shrimp with Cajun/Creole spice blend and toss in a hot skillet with a splash of oil. Stir-fry the shrimp until they just turn pink. Most cooks over-cook shrimp and they get tough. Remove the shrimp and cool them.

You can make the shrimp extra special by brining the them in a handful of Kosher salt dissolved in a quart of water, for about half an hour. Then drain and pat dry before seasoning and cooking.

Put the peeled Mango in a blender of food processor with the shredded leaves of Basil. Take them for a spin until you have a beautiful bright green puree. Chill the sauce. To serve, spoon the sauce into margarita glasses or delicate glass ice cream dishes, and hook the shrimp over the rim. Makes about a dozen shrimp cocktails.
folkfan
@folkfan
7 years ago
456 posts
Totally into poaching chicken breasts with a little spice to add flavor. I haven't tried poaching fish.Tomorrow night we're having Lake Perch which I normally do in a pan fried manner, but using a non-stick pan and a minimum spray of olive oil. Usually I dredge the fish in a seasoned flour mix after dipping it into a water and egg white bath. Salmon I grill on a George Forman grill with a sprinkle of dill and a very light spray of oil. Fresh dill if I can get it, otherwise dried. If I can't get fresh salmon, then I do Salmon Cakes or loaf using canned salmon.And you're right about no-fat, no purines being a water diet, which would really make me lose weight quickly. Only if I lose weight too quickly, I get a gout attack from the breaking up of my own fat cells. An example of that is that for quick weight loss the Atkins diet works really well for me. However it is too painful as within less than a month on it the gout strikes.Oh, do you have any good yogurt recipes. Fat Free yogurt with fruit in it is usually a daily part of my diet, but I'd love to vary it. I need to make Tzatziki, thinking about it.Ken Hulme said:
Yep I explored several websites to confirm all the high-purine foods to avoid. If you go totally no-purine, no-fat, you're pretty much looking at a Water diet!
Lots of chicken recipes. Buy or make it boneless before cooking. Saute things with water not oil in non-stick pans. Interestingly, Lamb is lower in purines than chicken is...I have lots of fish dishes too; if you are fish eaters. Not fried. Baked or poached in flavored liquids is a lot better for everyone.
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
Yep I explored several websites to confirm all the high-purine foods to avoid. If you go totally no-purine, no-fat, you're pretty much looking at a Water diet!Lots of chicken recipes. Buy or make it boneless before cooking. Saute things with water not oil in non-stick pans.Interestingly, Lamb is lower in purines than chicken is...I have lots of fish dishes too; if you are fish eaters. Not fried. Baked or poached in flavored liquids is a lot better for everyone.
folkfan
@folkfan
7 years ago
456 posts
They all sound good and the fresh mushrooms would have fewer purines than dried, so I think I could probably handle them. I've added oatmeal to my diet and that has one of the highest levels of purines for the grain products, so until I'm certain that oatmeal once a day isn't going to set things off with a cumulative effect, I'm being extra careful. And my hubby loves eggplant, so that is also good.According to the American Medical Association, purine-containing foods include:* Beer, other alcoholic beverages.* Anchovies, sardines in oil, fish roes, herring, all shellfish and shrimp etc.* Yeast.* Organ meat (liver, kidneys, sweetbreads)* Legumes (dried beans, peas)* Meat extracts, consomme, gravies. Meat based soups* Mushrooms, spinach, asparagus, cauliflower.And this is just the start. I gave myself gout one week with split pea soup, mushrooms, asparagus, and spinach. (OUCH) This was before I started on a very strict low purine diet. I'd stayed away from organ meats (Yuck) and shrimp (Yum) per my doctor's advice. I didn't know about all the other foods that had higher level of purines in them. I very quickly learned. Legumes are a favorite food group which I've now learned to handle very carefully.Ken Hulme said:
So here are some low-purine, low-fat recipes for Folkfan. None of these are "spicy" as in hot, but they do contain spices for flavor. When you can't eat a lot of things, you can help satisfy your tastebuds by using greater quantities of spices and herbs to flavor the things you can eat.

Mushroom Barley Bake
8 ounces fresh sliced mushrooms
1 cup chopped onion
1 cup medium barley
1/2 teaspoon salt (to taste or need)
1/8 teaspoon pepper
4 cups vegetable stock (see below)

Preparation:
In a large skillet over medium-low heat saut mushrooms and chopped onion until lightly browned. Add barley and brown lightly, stirring. Add salt and pepper; turn into a buttered 3-quart casserole.

Pour vegetable broth into the skillet and cook until hot. Pour over the barley mixture and mix well. Cover and bake in a preheated 350 oven for 1-1/2 hours, or until barley is tender. Check the barley occasionally and add more broth or water if needed.

Low Purine Vegetable Stock
All the veggies below are listed as "low in purines".

4 quarts water
1/4 of a Red Cabbage, shredded small
4-6 fresh Tomatoes, diced
1 bunch of Celery Tops (save the stalks for something else), minced
1 Teaspoon Marjoram
1 Teaspoon Thyme
1 Teaspoon Oregano
1 Teaspoon Rosemary,chopped fine
1 Teaspoon Cumin
1/2 Teaspoon White Pepper

Simmer on low for 1-2 hours until the liquid is reduced by a third to a half and is flavorful. Strain. Use.


Rotkraut - Braised Red Cabbage
2 Tbsp Oil for sauting (or use water)
1 Onion, chopped fine
1 head Red Cabbage, cored and shredded
2 Tbsp Red Wine Vinegar
1 to 1-1/2 cups Vegetable Stock or Water
1 Tbsp Sugar
3 Whole cloves
2 Bay leaves
Salt and Pepper -- to taste

Over medium heat in a large pot saut the onions until translucent. Add the cabbage in batches, stirring each addition until it wilts and begins to cook down. Stir in the vinegar and then add the remaining ingredients. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 20-30minutes until the cabbage is tender. Adjust seasoning and serve.


Greek Style Eggplant Boats
Cut eggplants in half lengthwise; hollow into "boats". Rub skin with oil (you arent going to eat the skins), bake 30 mins @ 350F.

Meanwhile, brown about half a pound of ground lamb (or use diced tofu), add onion, bell pepper, garlic, tomato, fresh sage, 1/2 oz feta cheese (just this once, for flavor), bread crumbs and eggplant guts. Simmer until thick. Stuff eggplant boats, top with breadcrumbs. Bake again @ 350 30-45 min.


Imam Biyaldi
Classic Middle Eastern Stew can be vegetarian or meated.
1 Eggplant, cubed
2 large Onions, sliced
6-8 Roma Tomatoes, chopped
1 teaspoon Cinnamon
1 Teaspoon All Spice
1 Teaspoon Cloves
Carnivores and others who can eat meats can add 1 lb of ground lamb.

Brown and drain the meat if you're using it. Combine everything in a pot with a cup or so of water and simmer into a thick stew. Serve with unleavened bread for scooping.


Moroccan Lemon Chicken
2 Chicken Breasts, boneless, skinless
1/3 cup Kalamata or other Green Olives, pitted
1/2 teaspon Oregano
1 Lemon, sliced
1 cup, uncooked Israeli Couscous (large pearl, not the small grain kind)
2 cups water.

Brining the chicken in a handful of Kosher salt and a gallon of water for 1 hour before cooking will make the meat much more moist, but not particularly salty. Rinse and pat dry. Sear the chicken on both sides. Reduce heat, add the other ingredients, and simmer for 30-45 minutes until the chicken is tender and the couscous is cooked. If you're not on a low purine diet, you can substitute a couple cans of garbanzos for the couscous.
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
So here are some low-purine, low-fat recipes for Folkfan. None of these are "spicy" as in hot, but they do contain spices for flavor. When you can't eat a lot of things, you can help satisfy your tastebuds by using greater quantities of spices and herbs to flavor the things you can eat.Mushroom Barley Bake8 ounces fresh sliced mushrooms1 cup chopped onion1 cup medium barley1/2 teaspoon salt (to taste or need)1/8 teaspoon pepper4 cups vegetable stock (see below)Preparation:In a large skillet over medium-low heat saut mushrooms and chopped onion until lightly browned. Add barley and brown lightly, stirring. Add salt and pepper; turn into a buttered 3-quart casserole.Pour vegetable broth into the skillet and cook until hot. Pour over the barley mixture and mix well. Cover and bake in a preheated 350 oven for 1-1/2 hours, or until barley is tender. Check the barley occasionally and add more broth or water if needed.Low Purine Vegetable StockAll the veggies below are listed as "low in purines".4 quarts water1/4 of a Red Cabbage, shredded small4-6 fresh Tomatoes, diced1 bunch of Celery Tops (save the stalks for something else), minced1 Teaspoon Marjoram1 Teaspoon Thyme1 Teaspoon Oregano1 Teaspoon Rosemary,chopped fine1 Teaspoon Cumin1/2 Teaspoon White PepperSimmer on low for 1-2 hours until the liquid is reduced by a third to a half and is flavorful. Strain. Use.Rotkraut - Braised Red Cabbage2 Tbsp Oil for sauting (or use water)1 Onion, chopped fine1 head Red Cabbage, cored and shredded2 Tbsp Red Wine Vinegar1 to 1-1/2 cups Vegetable Stock or Water1 Tbsp Sugar3 Whole cloves2 Bay leavesSalt and Pepper -- to tasteOver medium heat in a large pot saut the onions until translucent. Add the cabbage in batches, stirring each addition until it wilts and begins to cook down. Stir in the vinegar and then add the remaining ingredients. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 20-30minutes until the cabbage is tender. Adjust seasoning and serve.Greek Style Eggplant BoatsCut eggplants in half lengthwise; hollow into "boats". Rub skin with oil (you arent going to eat the skins), bake 30 mins @ 350F.Meanwhile, brown about half a pound of ground lamb (or use diced tofu), add onion, bell pepper, garlic, tomato, fresh sage, 1/2 oz feta cheese (just this once, for flavor), bread crumbs and eggplant guts. Simmer until thick. Stuff eggplant boats, top with breadcrumbs. Bake again @ 350 30-45 min.Imam BiyaldiClassic Middle Eastern Stew can be vegetarian or meated.1 Eggplant, cubed2 large Onions, sliced6-8 Roma Tomatoes, chopped1 teaspoon Cinnamon1 Teaspoon All Spice1 Teaspoon ClovesCarnivores and others who can eat meats can add 1 lb of ground lamb.Brown and drain the meat if you're using it. Combine everything in a pot with a cup or so of water and simmer into a thick stew. Serve with unleavened bread for scooping.Moroccan Lemon Chicken2 Chicken Breasts, boneless, skinless1/3 cup Kalamata or other Green Olives, pitted1/2 teaspon Oregano1 Lemon, sliced1 cup, uncooked Israeli Couscous (large pearl, not the small grain kind)2 cups water.Brining the chicken in a handful of Kosher salt and a gallon of water for 1 hour before cooking will make the meat much more moist, but not particularly salty. Rinse and pat dry. Sear the chicken on both sides. Reduce heat, add the other ingredients, and simmer for 30-45 minutes until the chicken is tender and the couscous is cooked. If you're not on a low purine diet, you can substitute a couple cans of garbanzos for the couscous.
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
Stephanie Stuckwisch said:
So, Ken, does this mean you might want to share your recipe for Tropical Shrimp salad you brought to one of the FOTMD celebration?
Do you mean my Basil-Mango Shrimp Cocktails?That's easy:6 or more raw shrimp per person, peeled, with tails left on1 large mango, peeled and pitted12 leaves of fresh BasilCajun/Creole Spice Blend, to taste1 Tbsp Oil for frying.Dust the shrimp with Cajun/Creole spice blend and toss in a hot skillet with a splash of oil. Stir-fry the shrimp until they just turn pink. Most cooks over-cook shrimp and they get tough. Remove the shrimp and cool them.You can make the shrimp extra special by brining the them in a handful of Kosher salt dissolved in a quart of water, for about half an hour. Then drain and pat dry before seasoning and cooking.Put the peeled Mango in a blender of food processor with the shredded leaves of Basil. Take them for a spin until you have a beautiful bright green puree. Chill the sauce. To serve, spoon the sauce into margarita glasses or delicate glass ice cream dishes, and hook the shrimp over the rim. Makes about a dozen shrimp cocktails.
Stephanie Stuckwisch
@stephanie-stuckwisch
7 years ago
61 posts
So, Ken, does this mean you might want to share your recipe for Tropical Shrimp salad you brought to one of the FOTMD celebration?
folkfan
@folkfan
7 years ago
456 posts
Ken, I forgot to mention that another item I throw into my Mac N' Cheese is half a bag or more of chopped broccoli. I'm fixing it for tonight. Since I have a bit of roast chicken left over, I'm going to chop it up and throw it in too. A one dish meal. (I really have learned to hate cooking. Especially if I have to chop up a lot of stuff.) Tongue.gifGrin.gif
Bill Davenport
@bill-davenport
7 years ago
81 posts
Oh Boy Ken!Have you started something fun?Our group has a General Meeting once a month and everyone is to bring a dish.I have tasted things that I had never tasted before. Last month one of the ladies brought Kale and White Bean Soup. I'm a soup lover and man was this awsome!Different and unusual salads,deserts, slaws, cheese dips. Ok, I just got home and haven't eaten yet so I have to stop.But great idea!Bill
folkfan
@folkfan
7 years ago
456 posts
Ken, While I admit to drooling over your recipe for Mac n' Cheese, leaving out the fresh cracked black pepper is not the only thing I'd have to leave out. My triglyceride levels are too high so I'm under doctor's instructions to lower my fat consumption. Also it will help in lowering my calorie intake as I've got to lose weight for the arthritis in my legs. So here's my Mac n' Cheese recipe.Use 2 boxes of a good mac and cheese mix and prepared as per box instructions only don't add the margarine or butter (a small amount of an olive oil based spread might be used), use skim milk, add a few slices of fat-free cheese. I don't add salt to the dish as I use a bit of kosher salt in the water when boiling the macaroni. Which I rinse and drain.I'd much prefer your recipe, but my doctor wouldn't. Got any good tasting low to no fat, not spicy, and low in purine recipes, Ken????? I'm getting kind of desperate as there are just so many things I'm suppose to stay away from. DANG102.gif102.gif102.gif102.gif102.gif106.gif106.gif106.gif106.gif
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,460 posts
So I figured it's about time we had a regular place to talk about food. Share recipes, complain about high food costs, availability of ingredients, all that good stuff.

So to start, here's an old family recipe - a different take on the classic Mac & Cheese. I made it again last night! This is not the usual "cheese soup with macaroni in it" that most folks make, But it's really cheesy (in a good way) and tasty (what's not to like about mac & cheese).

Mom's Mac & Cheese
  • 16 oz dry Macaroni
  • 16 oz block of Colby Jack Cheese (you can use any combo of cheeses you like here, but use block, not shredded). More cheese is always welcome
  • 1 Tbsp Kosher Salt (Mom used regular salt, but I like Kosher better)
  • Fresh Cracked Black Pepper to taste (Keigh, you can leave this out!)
  • 1 cup Whole Milk (not that wimpy 1% or 2% stuff - use real milk or even half&half)

Preheat your oven to 350-375F. Cook the macaroni to package directions. Drain and cool. Cut the cheese(s) into 1/2" or 3/4" cubes. Use a DEEP oven proof bowl. Put down about an inch of macaroni. Dust lightly with salt & pepper. Add a layer of cheese cubes. Repeat until you fill the bowl, ending with lots of cheese on top for a crust. Pour the milk all over the top.

Place bowl on a baking sheet to catch the spills. Place in the oven and bake for at least 1 hour; a bit longer won't hurt. Remove and cut into oohey, gooey wedges. Hot from the oven I like it just like that. When I re-heat, I like it dusted with a little chile powder, or Garam Masala or curry powder. Yyyyuuuummmm Will feed six hungry folks!




updated by @ken-hulme: 01/15/16 07:22:31AM