Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
6 years ago
2,028 posts

If it were me, I'd cut BIG holes in the sides that will be joined together, and then glue them up;  That way the sound can travel from end to end of the body very easily

marg
@marg
6 years ago
592 posts

If I glue several cigar boxes together, do I need to create an opening between them for the sound to move around or just put a hole in the top of them?

Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
6 years ago
2,028 posts

They are your cigar boxes, do with them as you please.  I think most builders keep them right side up to show off the cigar makers labels and such.   Either way around, the insides certainly can be used for storage; but as you say, you do need to insure that they don't open spontaneously.  

marg
@marg
6 years ago
592 posts

    I did find 3 cigar boxes that match up. I needed to go to several shops, there isn't as many cigar shops now but smoke shops. The boxes are not deep but they are made of wood. I did see some beautiful wood ones but couldn't find 3 that fit together. 

    I was thinking of turning them upstairs, seems to be a smother transition from one to the other. So now if the boxes can open on the bottom, could their insides be used as storage? I know I would need to turn the dulcimer over & also make sure they didn't just open on their own.

Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
6 years ago
2,028 posts

Marg -- just as with a regular dulcimer body, the larger the total interior volume, the more bass/baritone response you get, as well as more volume

marg
@marg
6 years ago
592 posts

Would a larger cigar box make the tone or volume different from a smaller size box?

 

Dusty Turtle
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
6 years ago
1,633 posts

Marg, that little dulcimer was made by FOTMD member  Peter W . You might contact him if you have any questions.  Notice that in addition to the swivel possum board, he has a small box situated directly under the fretboard.  The purposes of a box are to 1) amplify the sound, and 2) improve the tone.  To achieve the second, cardboard won't do, which is why I suggested cedar cigar boxes.

 




--
Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

As a musician, you have to keep one foot back in the past and one foot forward into the future.
-- Dizzy Gillespie

updated by @dusty-turtle: 08/04/17 12:35:40AM
marg
@marg
6 years ago
592 posts

Lots of different cigar box dulcimers, 2 & 3 boxes - great.

    This one was interesting also, no box just the possum board that also acts as a cover.

Dusty Turtle
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
6 years ago
1,633 posts

Yes, you want at least one sound hole. Since your fretboard is already made and the dulcimer fretboard sits on top of the box (instead of recessed into it like a guitar), your project is much easier than most.

Check out FOTMD Randy Adams playing a fretless cigar box dulcimer .  You can see how he set up the soundholes and how he arranged the two boxes underneath his fretboard.  Randy used two cigar boxes, but check out this Tiny Guitars version with three (and frets, too, along with a pickup).




--
Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

As a musician, you have to keep one foot back in the past and one foot forward into the future.
-- Dizzy Gillespie

updated by @dusty-turtle: 08/03/17 01:24:06PM
marg
@marg
6 years ago
592 posts

(Any cigar boxes will do, but those made of cedar will sound much better.)

dusty, 

do I need to put some type of sound hole in the box?

marg
@marg
6 years ago
592 posts

(fretboard is long holds the bridge and the nut,)

The fretboard is all together, head, bridge, nut & end strings pins. Lots of ideas, exciting possibilities. Can't wait to try something. Thanks so much everyone.

marg
@marg
6 years ago
592 posts

john-gribble,

(You may end up building instruments before too long!)

I don't think so but that would be great if it was something I could do. I am always amazed of the beauty of hand made dulcimers

Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
6 years ago
2,028 posts

I know a couple folks who took cardboard dulcimer fretboards and attached them to an old fiddle case (!!) and made a pretty good sounding dulcimer!  You can make all sorts of thin wood boxes with "craft lumber" from Lowes of Home Despot, to make really nice looking box dulcimers

HEWalker
HEWalker
@hewalker
6 years ago
27 posts

My husband took one of our cardboard dulcimers, removed the fretboard and attached to a box (larger than a cigar box ) and created a wonderful toned box/stick for himself. The most difficult part was removing the glue used to attach the fretboard to the cardboard....many hours of sanding and filing resulted in a perfect usable piece!

Dusty Turtle
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
6 years ago
1,633 posts

Marg, if the fretboard is long holds the bridge and the nut, then it would be easy to take it off the cardboard and find some nice cedar cigar boxes.  Glue them together and glue the fretboard on top.  It should sound better than the cardboard.  But if the bridge is separate and not actually attached to the fretboard, then you have to know what you're doing to match the vibrating string length with the fret spacing.

Any cigar boxes will do, but those made of cedar will sound much better.




--
Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

As a musician, you have to keep one foot back in the past and one foot forward into the future.
-- Dizzy Gillespie

updated by @dusty-turtle: 08/02/17 01:47:52AM
marg
@marg
6 years ago
592 posts

john-gribble,

(You may end up building instruments before too long!)

I don't think so but that would be great if it was something I could do. I am always amazed of the beauty of hand made dulcimers

John Gribble
John Gribble
@john-gribble
6 years ago
124 posts

Yes. You can do all of those things with the fretboard assembly. Experiment. But be careful! You may end up building instruments before too long!

marg
@marg
6 years ago
592 posts

(re-glue the fretboard back on the cardboard )

thanks patty but it's not the fretboard, it's the seems on the sides glue to the top & glue to the bottom. 

Maybe it could be fixed but I'm wanting to know if I can take the fretboard and put it on a flat board, like a possum board

Patty from Virginia
Patty from Virginia
@patty-from-virginia
6 years ago
230 posts

Depending on the glue, you may be able to warm it up to soften it. Then you can re-glue the fretboard back on the cardboard without the gaps. Here is the link to Backyard Music. I've sent emails to them and they've been good about answering back. Sometimes you have to give them a couple of days in case they are busy. 

http://www.backyardmusic.com/Welcome.html


updated by @patty-from-virginia: 07/24/17 09:32:07PM
marg
@marg
6 years ago
592 posts

The seems are not sealed, there are gaps all alone the seems. I painted it & it looks interesting but I was wondering since there are so many of the seems open, if I should see if I could put the fretboard on something else. The fretboard is fine, it's the seems.

Patty from Virginia
Patty from Virginia
@patty-from-virginia
6 years ago
230 posts

Hi Marg, I have a cardboard dulcimer that I put together myself. I'm not sure what you mean when you say the sides do not match up. Are you saying it's out of alignment? Not sure if the fret board could have been glued on properly if that's the case. If you can provide a picture that would help. I think if it sets in a warm environment the glue may soften but I would try to reposition the fretboard on the cardboard to keep it on the cardboard. I like my cardboard. It's unique. I acquired mine from Backyard Music. You can send them an email of your intentions and they can tell you what will work. 

marg
@marg
6 years ago
592 posts

I have a cardboard dulcimer given to me, lots of places that the sides do not match up. I was thinking of trying something and looking for your help or ideas or even if it would work.

Can I cut the fretboard away from the cardboard and place on something like a possum board? Maybe stick on a pick up to amp it - if sitting on a board there isn't enough sound?