Show us your sound holes!

marg
@marg
5 months ago
564 posts

saras

custom designs, beautiful & so personal

 

SaraS
SaraS
@saras
5 months ago
3 posts

Here is mine I designed them 

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Susie
Susie
@susie
last year
291 posts
Custom Folkcraft dolphin soundholes with matching dolphin fretboard inlay. One of Steve Ash's last creations, before his untimely death.
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marg
@marg
last year
564 posts

I ran across  Vander Woude"  dulcimers & they have the very same sound hole as my trailing/weeping/bleeding heart, what a surprise. His site directs one to Hewoud Music. Vander Woude decided to retire & his granddaughter, Victoria has taken over the business. I wrote her & she sent back this reply below. It was very sweet for Victoria to take the time to do this research - much like what has already been posted.

I hear their dulcimers are 'beautiful' & the sound 'unique'

"The meaning, origins, and history of the Trailing/Weeping/Bleeding Heart soundhole design are completely shrouded in mystery. Mountain Dulcimer lovers have been debating over it for years, but there appears to be no single concrete answers available. There are numerous theories, some of which I have included here: -Bleeding or Weeping Heart shapes are traditionally used to represent sadness or loss. For those who enjoyed playing sad love songs or wished to commemorate a lost loved one, bleeding heart soundholes would add a sentimental touch to their instrument and music. -A common theory is that they are not “bleeding” hearts but rather a depiction of “Trailing Hearts”, a flowering vine with heart-shaped leaves, also known as the Rosary Vine. Some Mountain Dulcimer builders specifically state that their design is a heart-shaped leaf and vine. -The geometrical heart shape was originally used to represent leaves (not sentiment), especially of the Linden tree. Legend says that any couple who sits under the branches of “the tree of lovers” would be in love forever. -The Pennsylvania Dutch frequently used hearts in their décor to represent love of God, family, friends, and country. The tips of the trailing hearts point heavenwards as a reminder that true love comes from God. The Mountain Dulcimer was partially based on a German folk instrument (the zither) and was commonly used as a church instrument, so this heart design is a reflection of the instrument’s roots. -The simplest theory is that the ornamental heart was born from builders experimenting with how to make heart soundholes more elegant. No symbolism was meant beyond those conveyed in standard hearts. As you can see, symbolism is mainly left open to interpretation now. Some people don't relish the thought of having "bleeding" hearts on their instrument and prefer the floral explanations. Others feel the historical meanings are more substantial. Legends and theories aside, the Trailing/Weeping/Bleeding Heart soundhole has become one of the most common and beloved Mountain Dulcimer soundhole designs. Most builders seem to use it as a soundhole design option. Its graceful ornamental shape adds a nice touch of whimsy to this beautiful folk instrument, it allows greater resonance than most soundhole designs, and the mysteries behind its origins reflect the mysteries of the Mountain Dulcimer’s true roots"

JenniferC
JenniferC
@jenniferc
last year
47 posts
I've really enjoyed looking through everyone's pictures on this forum topic!

This is my Ron Gibson teardrop. I spent a number of years living in an area frequented by barn swallows, and spent almost every morning sitting on my front porch watching them. Ron did a great job interpreting what I wanted!
Salt Springs
Salt Springs
@salt-springs
last year
113 posts

The Germans (Penn. Dutch) used the heart to represent 4 ideas concerning love.......love of God, love of family, love of friends and love of country at least that is what I recall from years ago.  In the old German Lutheran Liturgy which I grew up with, like the Roman liturgy the Sursum Corda is offered by the celebrant who intones........."Lift up your hearts" and the congregants reply........."We lift them up unto the Lord."    That intonation goes back to the third or fourth century according to those old dusty books I have.  The upward pointed heart may be a reference to doing that......looking to heaven the source of all true love.   (see those years of seminary have provided me with all sorts of information that would be great if I ever get on Jeopardy).  When the German settlers put hearts on all sorts of things they usually referred to love of family or community and faith.  Some have said  that upward pointing hearts meant the instrument was to be used for hymnody and celebration and the regular heart for the love of one human being for all of creation including family and friends.   Then again, maybe this is just all speculation......but it is fun to think about.

 

Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
last year
1,830 posts

IIRC "trailing hearts" is what the Ford's called their "vine with multiple heart shaped leaves" soundhole design.

Dusty Turtle
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
last year
1,066 posts

marg: ken

( Linden leaf - a source of magical power ... "bleeding heart" - too sentimental or liberal)

Both of those meanings sound better than maybe 'sad'

thanks 

I am not even sure the design in question is usually considered a "bleeding" or "weeping" heart, both of which imply loss and sadness.  What about a "trailing" heart?  I have definitely heard that term used.  I think Ron Ewing refers to trailing hearts as a soundhole option for his dulcimers.  It might even be a reference to a rosary vine, which is sometimes called a string of hearts or trailing hearts plant.

string of hearts image.jpg

Of course, it is very likely that there is no one stable meaning to a single image, but that different luthiers think it means different things or even nothing at all but just looks cool.




--
Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

As a musician, you have to keep one foot back in the past and one foot forward into the future.
-- Dizzy Gillespie

updated by @dusty-turtle: 06/27/17 02:00:17PM
marg
@marg
last year
564 posts

 Salt-Springs,

A true treasure

 

Salt Springs
Salt Springs
@salt-springs
last year
113 posts

Ike and Izzy........the last two Carolina Parakeets before the species went extinct.  These sound holes were done By Kerry Coates and this is one of the last dulcimers she built.  A genuine lady and true artist.  

 

 

IMG_3565.JPG

 

 


updated by @salt-springs: 06/27/17 01:09:40PM
Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
last year
1,830 posts

Kerry passed away in 2014; her passing was a great loss to the dulcimer world.

 

marg
@marg
last year
564 posts

ken

( Linden leaf - a source of magical power ... "bleeding heart" - too sentimental or liberal)

Both of those meanings sound better than maybe 'sad'

thanks

joe sanguinette
joe sanguinette
@joe-sanguinette
last year
92 posts

kerry anderson made beautiful and unusual sound holes.  no surprize her background was art and costume design.

she is a friend and advertized my books and cd's on her website  for years.  would love to see her back

Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
last year
1,830 posts

Bleeding or Weeping Hearts are also found on many tomahawk blades, as well as Pennsylvania/Kentucky longrifles.  As someone said there are as many folk tales about what that means as there are tomahawks and long rifles.  A "bleeding heart" is, of course, someone who is considered too sentimental or liberal in dealing with social situations. 

There is some indication that prior to the 14th century the heart as a geometric shape represented not the heart of sentimentality, but rather the shape of the Linden leaf, which was held by Germanic/Scandinavian mythology to be a source of magical power, or any number of other plant references.  Only in the 15th century does the heart geometric shape begin to represent love, sentimentality, and other Christian ideals.

Dusty Turtle
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
last year
1,066 posts

Bob, your dulcimers are indeed beautiful.  I like that heart inlay in the end block.  And I've always been in awe of the delicate work evidenced in nice rosette. How pretty!




--
Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

As a musician, you have to keep one foot back in the past and one foot forward into the future.
-- Dizzy Gillespie
marg
@marg
last year
564 posts

bob,

Your dulcimer you are working on is beautiful. Since you mention ( Weeping Heart motifs )  in this site, I was wondering if you knew what the meaning could be for them.

    Yes, this is a nice discussion & I am so glad it has started back up. I have several dulcimers with different sound holes but my latest is a San Carrell '84 'fiddleside' with the weeping heart, or crying heart. At the moment I have it tuned to DAAA & is a bit sadder than maybe DAdd would be. I understand Carrell returned to Fla to help his ill parents in '84 & maybe only made a few dulcimers after that, could the weeping Hearts be because he was leaving TN? 

Bob
Bob
@bob
last year
180 posts

Its always so interesting to see the many creative designs and elements used for dulcimer sound-holes. There are some true beauties on display on this thread that sparked my design interests with the creativity and artistry of these unique elements.

I always have liked the traditional Heart and Weeping Heart motifs and used them on the few dulcimers I have made, including my recent March's Dulcimer. Also beautiful are the various Rosettes that are on many dulcimers. I have used them in my April and May Dulcimer (as well as soon completed June's Dulcimer), tinting some with a splash of color for a nice effect.

This is a wonderful discussion!!

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Dusty Turtle
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
last year
1,066 posts

This is a cool discussion topic in which I participated back when I was a newbie, could barely play a few tunes, and only had one dulcimer. Ah, those simple days of yore!  I still have that first dulcimer, by the way.

My most recent purchase is a McCafferty dulcimer.  The inlay on the fretboard centers on the fifth fret with a wolf silhouetted against a full moon. And then for position markers (on frets 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 12) there are little stars positioned in such a way as to appear random but still mark the appropriate frets.  The four soundholes are quarter moons, with one little star, as you see in this picture.  My daughter insists that only one name is appropriate for this dulcimer: Luna.  So be it.

 

DSC_0008edit.jpg




--
Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

As a musician, you have to keep one foot back in the past and one foot forward into the future.
-- Dizzy Gillespie
Leslie Wilson
Leslie Wilson
@leslie-wilson
3 years ago
1 posts
The soundhole on my lovely new Ron Gibson dulcimer is a stylized Colorado Columbine. I wanted to stay traditional as much as possible but have something that reflected my Colorado mountain origins.
Joe Robison
Joe Robison
@joe-robison
3 years ago
38 posts

My computer skills don't allow me to send a picture but I had a caller inquiring about my dulcimers the other day that asked me if I had any with butterfly sound holes. I didn't but a few days later discovered my wife had some butterfly magnets on the fridge. They were just the right size for the large holes and my wife found a greeting card with a smaller one for the other hole. I have them cut for a dulcimer in progress and like them very much. I probably will use them again.

Mark Hoskey
Mark Hoskey
@mark-hoskey
3 years ago
5 posts

Furman Thornton dulcimer from 2002

Upper bout

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Lower bout

237_forums.jpg

Meredith Winn
Meredith Winn
@meredith-winn
3 years ago
4 posts

I have Blair 285

Meredith Winn
Meredith Winn
@meredith-winn
3 years ago
4 posts


Mark Jones said:

Check out more Mark Blair Dulcimers online at www.markblairdulcimers.com and also see the Facebook page forMark Blair Dulcimers. My name is Mark, I was named after Mark Blair, he was my Uncle. I hadn't tracked down #290 yet!

Dave shattuck said:

I just bought this on eBay, and I am thrilled. It was234_forums.jpg built by Mark Blair, #290. He made around 600+. All walnut I believe. These holes he uses are patented. Also the Smithsonian bought one of his dulcimers


Nikolas4squid
Nikolas4squid
@nikolas4squid
3 years ago
25 posts

Can't go wrong with birds. Those are nice.

Bob Reinsel
Bob Reinsel
@bob-reinsel
3 years ago
97 posts

Eastern Kingbirds. These were the first sound holes I ever cut.

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--
Bob
Site Moderator

The greatest music is made for love, not for money -- Greg Lake
marg
@marg
3 years ago
564 posts

So many different sound holes designs, mine also now.

marg
@marg
3 years ago
564 posts

yes, very nice

Dana R. McCall said:

I love natural knot holes for sound holes and have several dulcimers that way. I don't think it make any difference in the sound they are just pretty.
Meredith Winn
Meredith Winn
@meredith-winn
4 years ago
4 posts

My neighbor just gave me #285 for FREE!

Dave shattuck said:

I just bought this on eBay, and I am thrilled. It was231_forums.jpg built by Mark Blair, #290. He made around 600+. All walnut I believe. These holes he uses are patented. Also the Smithsonian bought one of his dulcimers

John D Hedrick
John D Hedrick
@john-d-hedrick
4 years ago
3 posts
Here is a simple sound hole design using Forstner bits. Just stringing up my most recent 25" VSL.
Dave shattuck
Dave shattuck
@dave-shattuck
4 years ago
19 posts

I just bought this on eBay, and I am thrilled. It was230_forums.jpg built by Mark Blair, #290. He made around 600+. All walnut I believe. These holes he uses are patented. Also the Smithsonian bought one of his dulcimers

Jack Ferguson
Jack Ferguson
@jack-ferguson
4 years ago
13 posts

Sharon, I like your instruments/sound-holes, especially the Scheitholt!

Sharon Setzer said:

I have hummingbirds, circles, and f/Celtic knot sound holes.
Jack Ferguson
Jack Ferguson
@jack-ferguson
4 years ago
13 posts


John D Hedrick said:

I like your designs. Do you use ink or burner for the outlines?

Jack Ferguson said: I wood-burn the design.

Nice rosettes, John. I've found my "blossom" designs to be popular.

229_forums.jpg?width=721


Sharon Setzer
Sharon Setzer
@sharon-setzer
4 years ago
3 posts
I have hummingbirds, circles, and f/Celtic knot sound holes.
John D Hedrick
John D Hedrick
@john-d-hedrick
4 years ago
3 posts
I like your designs. Do you use ink or burner for the outlines?

Jack Ferguson said:

Nice rosettes, John. I've found my "blossom" designs to be popular.

228_forums.jpg?width=721

Jack Ferguson
Jack Ferguson
@jack-ferguson
4 years ago
13 posts

Nice rosettes, John. I've found my "blossom" designs to be popular.

227_forums.jpg?width=721

John D Hedrick
John D Hedrick
@john-d-hedrick
4 years ago
3 posts
Some great ideas for sound holes and rosettes. Here is a photo of what I have been using lately
Peter W.
Peter W.
@peter-w
5 years ago
49 posts

So now I can contribute something to this interesting thread as well... Grin.gif

These are the soundholes of my modified Cedar Creek kit dulcimer. I drilled them myself yesterday. A simple, timeless design made with three wood drills of 6, 12 and 18 mm (about 1/4, 1/2 and 3/4 inches).

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Peter W.
Peter W.
@peter-w
5 years ago
49 posts

Hi Robert,

the "diamond" pattern on those psalteries look great!

robert schuler
robert schuler
@robert-schuler
6 years ago
268 posts

Here are some of my psaltery sound holes. The diamond pattern I got off a psaltery web site long ago sorry I don;t remember who's. I enjoy making this pattern with a 3/8" wood file. The hummingbird came about after I inlaid a hummer marquaty on a cedar top... Bob.

nick o'sullivan
nick o'sullivan
@nick-osullivan
6 years ago
6 posts

Here's a few from my dulcimers. The top one is from my first dulcimer, which was made in Scotland in the mid 1980s. Next one down is from a David Beede "eedy beedy" dulcimer and the last two from my Ken Bloom 5 string222_forums.jpg?width=721223_forums.jpg?width=721224_forums.jpg?width=721225_forums.jpg?width=721

Steven Deckard
Steven Deckard
@steven-deckard
6 years ago
7 posts

Mike Clemmer made this new dulcimer for me.

Thetop is vines and crosses.

The bottom is vines and doves.

The dulcimer sounds great too.


updated by @steven-deckard: 06/30/15 10:22:41AM
Mandy
Mandy
@mandy
6 years ago
147 posts

Cool, thanks!

Barbara P said:

Mandy, take a look at this paper written on the Huntington dulcimer. The inverted hearts have a meaning (or more than one meaning). Here's the link:

http://mountaindulcimer.ning.com/forum/topics/huntington-dulcimer-r...

Terry Lupardus
Terry Lupardus
@terry-lupardus
6 years ago
3 posts

Mine is a purple heartwood with the black walnut sound holes..


Terry Lupardus said:

I have one too.. Is yours made by Jim Goode at Mastertone Dulcimers in West Virginia?

Dana R. McCall said:
This is one I have with walnut sides and back and a cedar top with walnut soundholes

Barbara P
Barbara P
@barbara-p
6 years ago
63 posts

Those are beautiful Ryan! They look like flames.

Barbara P
Barbara P
@barbara-p
6 years ago
63 posts

Mandy, take a look at this paper written on the Huntington dulcimer. The inverted hearts have a meaning (or more than one meaning). Here's the link:

http://mountaindulcimer.ning.com/forum/topics/huntington-dulcimer-research

Mandy
Mandy
@mandy
6 years ago
147 posts

Hmm ok thanks Strumelia. Guess it's just me, I also wonder about why lots of banjo's have stars on them. They sure are nice no matter what the holes are. LOL

Strumelia
Strumelia
@strumelia
6 years ago
1,900 posts

Mandy, if you look through books with photos of pre-1940 dulcimers, you'll see all kinds of shaped sound holes- circles, half moons, S shaped, F clefs, diamonds, tiny holes drilled in various patterns, hearts, and various other interesting designs. The Kentucky hourglass dulcimers do seem to have more hearts than old dulcimers of other body shapes from other regions, but overall in pre-revival dulcimers there are more round sound holes by far than any other shape.


Mandy said:

Great thread here! Can someone tell my why traditional dulcimers seem to all have the heart sound holes? Mine does and most I've seen do as well. Someone enlighten me please. Thanks in advance.




--
Site Owner

Those irritated by grain of sand best avoid beach.
-Strumelia proverb c.1990
Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
6 years ago
1,830 posts

...because hearts are traditional???

Mandy
Mandy
@mandy
6 years ago
147 posts

Great thread here! Can someone tell my why traditional dulcimers seem to all have the heart sound holes? Mine does and most I've seen do as well. Someone enlighten me please. Thanks in advance.

Randy S. Bretz
Randy S. Bretz
@randy-s-bretz
6 years ago
9 posts

221_forums.jpg?width=721birds of prey

carol anderson
carol anderson
@carol-anderson
6 years ago
8 posts

That is indeed beautiful wood!

folkfan
@folkfan
6 years ago
455 posts

That's a poplar top. Some poplars develop the most amazing colors. Something about the soil that they grow in, I believe. Had a top once that went from cream yellow green blue purple red to brown. Called that instrument, "Joseph's coat".

carol anderson said:




What type of wood is the top, with the flames? It's so beautiful1









Nick Pope
Nick Pope
@nick-pope
6 years ago
9 posts

Great threadSmile.gifBeing a builder I love looking at all these beautiful designs.

Lots of inspiration.

Here's the dulcimer I made in January this year.

Fairly standard 'F' holes.

I'm working on some variations for my next one.

Nick

Jack Ferguson
Jack Ferguson
@jack-ferguson
6 years ago
13 posts

Nice looking dulcimer!

Beth Hansen-Buth said:

218_forums.jpg

My Folkcraft Northern Cherry has heart & vine tone holes. They have a wide variety to choose from on their website. I made my choice for 2 main reasons: 1 - I wanted something that reflected the tradition of heart shaped holes in the Mountain Dulcimer. and 2 - I wanted tone holes too small to lose a pick in! I used to lose my picks all the time in my guitar when I had one. I did not want that annoying problem to happen with my dulcimer too! Grin.gif

BethH
BethH
@beth-hansen-buth
6 years ago
45 posts

My Folkcraft Northern Cherry has heart & vine tone holes. They have a wide variety to choose from on their website. I made my choice for 2 main reasons: 1 - I wanted something that reflected the tradition of heart shaped holes in the Mountain Dulcimer. and 2 - I wanted tone holes too small to lose a pick in! I used to lose my picks all the time in my guitar when I had one. I did not want that annoying problem to happen with my dulcimer too! Grin.gif

Jack Ferguson
Jack Ferguson
@jack-ferguson
6 years ago
13 posts

Great idea to show sound-holes. Here are some I've made at www.appflutes.com

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Jeannie in Paradise
Jeannie in Paradise
@jeannie-in-paradise
7 years ago
4 posts
Hi. I thought I'd show off my rose sound holes on my "Mari Rose" Bonnie Carol dulcimer. If I can figure out how to get the photo to attach here... :-)
Tim  Canuelle
Tim Canuelle
@tim-canuelle
7 years ago
14 posts
Very nice Paul. Those are really nice.
Paul Rappell
Paul Rappell
@paul-rappell
7 years ago
31 posts

212_forums.jpg?width=721

The trillium is Ontario's provincial flower. This 1974 Oskar Graf is the only dulcimer I've ever owned. It has an extremely thin cedar top, which has been smashed in and repairedtwice. I replaced the handmade friction tuners and the ebony dowel that held the string loops(until itsnapped in two).It still sounds great. Oskar hasn't made dulcimers in many years. He's in demand as a guitar maker now. A few years ago I brought the dulcimer to Oskar's presentation at the guitar symposium at Queen's University here in Kingston. It was a surprise not only to him, but to a number of attendees who didn't know what it was.

George Wentland
George Wentland
@george-wentland
7 years ago
1 posts

My favorite Dulcimers have round polycarbonate lined sound holes. I have three.

Gwyn Calvetti
Gwyn Calvetti
@gwyn-calvetti
7 years ago
12 posts

Gila Mountain Dulcimers

Her website still has supplies and things to go with the dulcimers, but she's no longer building them. It's an absolutely beautiful instrument, too.

Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,830 posts
Kerry' not building anymore??? Dang! She made some fabulous dulcimers.
Gwyn Calvetti
Gwyn Calvetti
@gwyn-calvetti
7 years ago
12 posts

I have two other dulcimers, but this is the one I play, made by Kerry Anderson, who sadly is not making instruments anymore as far as I know. This was one she had already made that I really liked, and the savings from having a custom design were nice, too!

211_forums.jpg?width=600

Burrell Loew
Burrell Loew
@burrell-loew
7 years ago
11 posts

I have used a lot of different sound holes from knot hole to dove but usely try to keep them simple. here are a couple of pix.

burrell


updated by @burrell-loew: 06/30/15 10:21:13AM
Kevin Little
Kevin Little
@kevin-little
7 years ago
21 posts
210_forums.jpg?width=721Here's the nice, understated F-Heart soundhole on my Noteworthy sassafrass amd walnut MD made by Jeff Gaynor in OH. Not too flashy pr fancy, but the balance is about perfect in my eye.
Dana R. McCall
Dana R. McCall
@dana-r-mccall
7 years ago
188 posts
Hello just saw the post. No mine was made by a guy in Zacarhia KY He was a Durbin.Smile.gif

Terry Lupardus said:
I have one too.. Is yours made by Jim Goode at Mastertone Dulcimers in West Virginia?

Dana R. McCall said:
This is one I have with walnut sides and back and a cedar top with walnut soundholes

ERWIN NISTLER
ERWIN NISTLER
@erwin-nistler
7 years ago
2 posts

The pictures are sound holes in my dulcimer.

They represent the nicest sounds in nature.

Wolf howling, Loon vocalizing all it's songs.

The friendly morning dove cooing in my back yard.

The colors are different color wood and woodburning.

Tim  Canuelle
Tim Canuelle
@tim-canuelle
7 years ago
14 posts
On left is a 1986 Edgar McCoppin, center one is unknown, on the right is my 1991 Clifford Glenn
Tim  Canuelle
Tim Canuelle
@tim-canuelle
7 years ago
14 posts

I guess I have Hearts, F-holes and round

209_forums.jpg?width=721

Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
7 years ago
1,830 posts
David - what you're calling a 'jam dulcimer" is actually called a Courting Dulcimer, and the intent is/was that two people could play at the same time.
Ima Freeman
Ima Freeman
@ima-freeman
7 years ago
1 posts

Some creative ideas andcool looking pieces!

Now I need another dulcimer like a hole in the head, but should I run across one of those natural knot hole examples that strikes my fancy, I'm in !

Bill Arnold
Bill Arnold
@bill-arnold
7 years ago
2 posts
The soybean soundholes are on a dulcimer I built for the Indiana State Fair. The theme for the fair this year is the Year of Soybeans. The sewing soundholes are on a dulcimer that will be entered in the state fair too. The Statue of Liberty soundholes are on a dulcimer I built last year. It is nice seeing all the different artwork.
Robin Thompson
Robin Thompson
@robin-thompson
7 years ago
1,014 posts
Your dulcimer and that smiley must be twins who were separated at birth, Strumelia! Smile.gif

Strumelia said:
Here are my sound holes.... 22.gif208_forums.jpg



--
Robin T
one of the Moderators here :)
Keep a song in your heart!
Strumelia
Strumelia
@strumelia
7 years ago
1,900 posts
Here are my sound holes....


--
Site Owner

Those irritated by grain of sand best avoid beach.
-Strumelia proverb c.1990
Terry Lupardus
Terry Lupardus
@terry-lupardus
7 years ago
3 posts
I have one too.. Is yours made by Jim Goode at Mastertone Dulcimers in West Virginia?

Dana R. McCall said:
This is one I have with walnut sides and back and a cedar top with walnut soundholes
 
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