What's your favorite mournful, spooky, or lonesome song to play?

Brian G.
Brian G.
@brian-g
6 days ago
107 posts

Jan Potts:

A similar idea, but no, the one I'm looking for is definitely "October is a Gypsy Lass". I've found it in a couple spots online, but no one ever says who wrote it...either the words or the music.

Hi Jan,

Did you ever find any more info on October is a Gypsy Lass?  I'm very curious about it also. I know it only by these words (and did not know it was even a song - I thought it was "just" a poem):


October is a gypsy lass

Who dances through our town

Scarlet is her flying scarf

Many-hued her gown

On her dusky hair she wears

A crown of bittersweet

Maples spread a golden carpet

For her dancing feet


 

Tumbleweed
Tumbleweed
@tumbleweed
6 days ago
24 posts
Any of Hank Williams' slow songs for mournful and lonesome. Fugue in D minor for scary
Pierre-Yves Donnio
Pierre-Yves Donnio
@pierre-yves-donnio
one week ago
5 posts

The Lover's Ghost (Child 248) as sung by Barbara Dickson, New Celeste or Pauline Scanlon

Gale A Barr
Gale A Barr
@gale-a-barr
one week ago
41 posts

Great thread. I like the plaintive and spooky tunes that you all have suggested. I happened on a reel called Ichabod;s Last Ride in a music collection from the Kaiser Family group (Squirrel's nest for the folks that have been to Evart Funfest http://squirrelsnestlive.com/index.php) that is fun. Learning it as it is a nice spooky tune in D minor but I can only aspire to play it as fast as I have heard it.

Salt Springs
Salt Springs
@salt-springs
one week ago
104 posts

This is an absolute no brainer for me............"The Unquiet Grave" by Jean Ritchie..............you can hear her sing it here:

https://blogs.loc.gov/folklife/2017/10/ghost-stories-in-song-for-halloween/

 

It is such an easy tune to play.......btw, there are a few others by other artists there as well...........enjoy!

billybobboy42
@billybobboy42
2 weeks ago
1 posts

Here’s two sad ones that, given the right mood, brings me to tears:

the Irish American song Maggie 

A tree in the Meadow as sung by Margaret Whiting

FoundryRat
FoundryRat
@foundryrat
4 weeks ago
2 posts

Richard Farina's "A Swallow Song" whose melody is from a Ladino song "Los Bilbilicos".  Need a chromatic dulcimer to play it, though. (Sometimes misspelled as "Los Bibilicos) Truly haunting melody with words to match.

Geckostar97
Geckostar97
@geckostar97
4 weeks ago
14 posts
Banks of the Ohio is chilling when you read the words. A man murders his true love.
Frank Ross
Frank Ross
@frank-ross
4 weeks ago
34 posts

Cad E Sin Don Te Sin  has always seemed spooky to me   Link to tab


updated by @frank-ross: 08/26/18 02:52:39PM
Kusani
Kusani
@kusani
4 weeks ago
240 posts

Tom Dooley?  sweating

 

Elvensong
Elvensong
@elvensong
4 weeks ago
27 posts

Croí Cróga by Clannad or Loreena McKennitt's version of The Highwayman

Robin Thompson
Robin Thompson
@robin-thompson
4 weeks ago
976 posts

Omie Wise is such a mournful and haunting song. 




--
Robin T
one of the Moderators here :)
Keep a song in your heart!
Lois Sprengnether Keel
Lois Sprengnether Keel
@lois-sprengnether-keel
one month ago
118 posts

Thank you for "resurrecting" these songs.  (Zombie Jamboree by the Kingston Trio just popped into my mind as I said that, but that is definitely NOT mournful, spooky, or lonesome.)  I, too, enjoy "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry" as Wanda Degan taught an Ionian version.  The reason for my thanks is I was wanting something spooky for dulcimer and wasn't happy with what I found among my own music.

The mention of "She Moved Through the Fair" is perfect for me.  I've loved & been haunted by it for a long time.  The same was true about the baritone dulcimer, so, now that I have one, this is going to be my first real work for it.  Tried to figure it out with SMN and what I came up with seemed flat.  Went online and found an experimental way to tab it at Digital Tradition.  I chose AbEbAb tuning and am dying to play it . . . well maybe I'll just hold a seance by playing it.  The October meeting of my local folklore society has Ghost Stories as the theme.  I could tell tons, but the group is really geared towards music and I like to challenge myself musically monthly, so I really want to chill everybody out with this piece.

BTW I know a few here play bowed psaltery and ages ago I played Tom Lehrer's "The Irish Ballad" on mine.  If you know Tom Lehrer's work, you can appreciate it's satirical.  On guitar I like to sing an old song, "The Legend of the Red Mill" from the Rudolf Friml operetta, The Red Mill.  It has a great spooky refrain and, like "She Moved Through the Fair", it doesn't answer all the mysteries it raises.

Dusty Turtle
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
one month ago
1,024 posts

Ken HulmeLong Black Veil's a good one, Dusty.  Check out the lyrics to Mattie Groves -- the predecessor tune for Shady Grove.

Good one, Ken. I think I have that on an old Doc Watson album.




--
Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

As a musician, you have to keep one foot back in the past and one foot forward into the future.
-- Dizzy Gillespie
Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
one month ago
1,754 posts

Long Black Veil's a good one, Dusty.  Check out the lyrics to Mattie Groves -- the predecessor tune for Shady Grove.

Skip
Skip
@skip
one month ago
245 posts

The group I play with recently introduced me to ' A Soldiers Lament'. It's not spooky, just very, very sad. I'm not a very emotional type of person, but this song really affects me. Our female vocalist was the lead with the others backing her up on the hallelujahs. It probably doesn't help being retired military.

Dusty Turtle
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
one month ago
1,024 posts

It's funny to see this old thread resurrected.  I just decided to put together a bunch of murder ballads for a workshop next spring.

I've always thought "Long Black Veil" was creepy because the singer is dead. 

The scaffold rose high as eternity neared

She stood in the crowd but she shed not a tear

Often at night when the cold wind blows

In her long black veil she cries over my bones

 




--
Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

As a musician, you have to keep one foot back in the past and one foot forward into the future.
-- Dizzy Gillespie

updated by @dusty-turtle: 08/23/18 07:01:00PM
Strumelia
Strumelia
@strumelia
one month ago
1,848 posts

I've always found The Well Below the Valley to be about as dark and creepy as they come.




--
Site Owner

Those irritated by grain of sand best avoid beach.
-Strumelia proverb c.1990
Ken Backer
Ken Backer
@ken-backer
4 years ago
32 posts

Thanks, Stephen, for the info. It is such a pretty, haunting song. I have the "Song Catcher" DVD and just happened to watch it again a few days ago. I have been doing the song for some time using the dulcimer. I use a different, less clunky rythm than is heard in the movie.

Stephen Addison said:

The songwriter( of When the Mountains cry) has posted a lead sheet on his web page, its fairly easy to play from it - I've used this for banjo and dulcimer versions as well as guitar versions. Here is a link to David Mansfield's lead sheet. You can make it sound just like the movie - it's also easy to make it too pretty.

Ellen Rice said:

Any chance of the TAB being posted some place ?Grin.gif


Stephen Addison
Stephen Addison
@stephen-addison
4 years ago
9 posts

The songwriter( of When the Mountains cry) has posted a lead sheet on his web page, its fairly easy to play from it - I've used this for banjo and dulcimer versions as well as guitar versions. Here is a link to David Mansfield's lead sheet. You can make it sound just like the movie - it's also easy to make it too pretty.

Ellen Rice said:

Any chance of the TAB being posted some place ?Grin.gif

Helen Seiler
Helen Seiler
@helen-seiler
4 years ago
141 posts

Wayfaring stranger does it for me. But then, I don't know many sad tunes yet

John Keane
John Keane
@john-keane
4 years ago
208 posts

That's FOTMD member Michael Futreal of Twang Darkly (we share Shreveport, LA as home base). Great stuff!


Brian G. said:

I wouldn't call You are My Sunshine a bright and cheery song at all, especially when you consider the verses. This verse, for example, has a more melancholy feel:

"The other night, dear, as I lay sleeping
I dreamt I held you in my arms
When I awoke, dear, I was mistaken
So I hung my head, and I cried"

This one seems vaguely menacing:

"I'll always love you and make you happy
If you will only say the same
But if you leave me to love another,
You'll regret it all one day"

And this one is definitely sad:

"You told me once, dear
You really loved me
That no one else could come between.
But now you've left me
And love another,
You have shattered all my dreams."

Aura Waters said:

Just for fun, come see this guy's minor key YouTube version of "You Are My Sunshine" entitled "Not My Sunshine"

It really demonstrates what a minor key can do to an otherwise bright and cheery song!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H35kC4IBHvg


Brian G.
Brian G.
@brian-g
4 years ago
107 posts

I wouldn't call You are My Sunshine a bright and cheery song at all, especially when you consider the verses. This verse, for example, has a more melancholy feel:

"The other night, dear, as I lay sleeping
I dreamt I held you in my arms
When I awoke, dear, I was mistaken
So I hung my head, and I cried"

This one seems vaguely menacing:

"I'll always love you and make you happy
If you will only say the same
But if you leave me to love another,
You'll regret it all one day"

And this one is definitely sad:

"You told me once, dear
You really loved me
That no one else could come between.
But now you've left me
And love another,
You have shattered all my dreams."

Aura Waters said:

Just for fun, come see this guy's minor key YouTube version of "You Are My Sunshine" entitled "Not My Sunshine"

It really demonstrates what a minor key can do to an otherwise bright and cheery song!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H35kC4IBHvg

Ellen Rice
Ellen Rice
@ellen-rice
4 years ago
46 posts

Oh, so pretty!


Guy Babusek said:

Ellen Rice
Ellen Rice
@ellen-rice
4 years ago
46 posts

Any chance of the TAB being posted some place ?Grin.gif

Ken Backer
Ken Backer
@ken-backer
4 years ago
32 posts

The funeral song from the movie "The Song Catcher" (When the Mountains Cry). It is one of the most simple, haunting songs I have ever heard. I sing and play a version of the it on the dulcimer.

William Mann
William Mann
@william-mann
4 years ago
23 posts

Under "plaintive" more than the other choices: two hymns (I think both are from the shaped-note tradition) chorded in B minor in DAA tuning: "Wayfaring Stranger" and "What Wondrous Love Is This."

Minor keys have an unfinished quality about them, with something in them begging to be resolved. This is a perfect match to "Wayfaring Stranger," a story of a spiritual pilgrim waiting for his unsatisfying and unfinished life to be resolved by entrance into the heavenly Kingdom. "Wondrous Love," likewise, presents an unfinished story. It is a Lenten hymn which reflects upon what Christ's love for us cost Him, while awaiting the not-yet-achieved joy of Easter. These two songs, with their anxious, "not-quite-yet" quality, illustrate why people started composing in minor keys in the first place.

Aura Waters
Aura Waters
@aura-waters
4 years ago
2 posts

Just for fun, come see this guy's minor key YouTube version of "You Are My Sunshine" entitled "Not My Sunshine"

It really demonstrates what a minor key can do to an otherwise bright and cheery song!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H35kC4IBHvg

Aura Waters
Aura Waters
@aura-waters
4 years ago
2 posts

The saddest, most honest, truest song ever written that captures all the pain of this earth: "The House of the Rising Sun"

Guy Babusek
Guy Babusek
@guy-babusek
4 years ago
103 posts
Flint Hill
Flint Hill
@flint-hill
4 years ago
85 posts

I really love this thread.

This might be a good place to mention "Creepalachian" music. It's contemporary, alternative Appalachian music, typically dark, moody and minor. Tom House's "Someone's Digging in the Underground" is a good dulcimable example. Except for the electric rhythm guitar, it could be something Alan Lomax recorded.

There's a badly recorded versionHEREor get the studio track from Amazon for a buck.Scroll way down for the lyricsHERE.

I think of Tom House as reporting from Appalachian darkside in the amphetamine age. It ain't sweet, spiritual stuff, be advised.

See also Freakwater, another group in this genre.

robert schuler
robert schuler
@robert-schuler
4 years ago
263 posts
Did anyone mention Omie Wise. Another might be Old True Lovers by Edden Hammond. Or The Carpenters Wife... Actually anything played on the banjo in sawmill tuning... Bob
updated by @robert-schuler: 07/04/15 01:45:05PM
john p
john p
@john-p
4 years ago
211 posts

I've always thought that 'My Dearest Dear' was very sad. I'ts one of those songs that won't go away and I have several tunes to it now.

Guy Babusek
Guy Babusek
@guy-babusek
4 years ago
103 posts
Cynthia Wigington
Cynthia Wigington
@cynthia-wigington
4 years ago
81 posts

I just realized you did I Moved Through the Fair. It's amazing.

Cynthia Wigington
Cynthia Wigington
@cynthia-wigington
4 years ago
81 posts

These are to lovely Guy. Watching your fingers in the first one was like watching ballet.

Guy Babusek
Guy Babusek
@guy-babusek
4 years ago
103 posts
Jan Potts
Jan Potts
@jan-potts
4 years ago
440 posts

A similar idea, but no, the one I'm looking for is definitely "October is a Gypsy Lass". I've found it in a couple spots online, but no one ever says who wrote it...either the words or the music.




--
Jan Potts, Lexington, KY
Site Moderator

"Use what talents you possess; the woods would be very silent if no birds sang there except those that sang best." Henry Van Dyke
Ellen Rice
Ellen Rice
@ellen-rice
4 years ago
46 posts

Could it be this:

October is a gypsy queen
In dress of red and gold.
She sleeps beneath the silver moon
When nights are crisp and cold.
The meadows flame with color now,
which once were cool and green.
Wild asters and the goldenrod
Bow low to greet their queen.
When she is tripping through the wood
With song so clear and sweet,
The autumn leaves come sifting down
And rustle 'neath her feet.
Winifred C. Marshall

Jan Potts
Jan Potts
@jan-potts
4 years ago
440 posts

One of my fall favorites is "October is a Gypsy Lass" which was published in some magazine for children in the mid-late 50's. I have no idea who wrote it, but my sisters remember all the words and we've always remembered the tune, which can be sung spritelyor slowly and spookily--I like it both ways. If anyone could ever find the info on this, I would be forever grateful. I would also, of course, like to know if it is copyrighted!Grin.gif




--
Jan Potts, Lexington, KY
Site Moderator

"Use what talents you possess; the woods would be very silent if no birds sang there except those that sang best." Henry Van Dyke
Cynthia Wigington
Cynthia Wigington
@cynthia-wigington
4 years ago
81 posts

I meant "She Moved Thro the Fair" DAaa

Kristi Keller
Kristi Keller
@kristi-keller
4 years ago
90 posts

Two special favorites: Three Blind Mice (Janita Baker's transcription of tune from around 1600) and Ghost Chickens in the Sky which deals with revenge on those who raise birds for Colonel Sanders.

There make my flesh crawl! Gleeful and nasty tones come from my throat. Horror in my heart.....ahaaaaa

Ginney Camden
Ginney Camden
@ginney-camden
4 years ago
6 posts

This tune is not haunted or scary...but I think In the Bleak Midwinter is a mournful tune. I love to play it.

Strumelia
Strumelia
@strumelia
4 years ago
1,848 posts

Yay! Flint is stopping by!




--
Site Owner

Those irritated by grain of sand best avoid beach.
-Strumelia proverb c.1990
Robin Thompson
Robin Thompson
@robin-thompson
4 years ago
976 posts
Flint, I'm so happy to see a you again! Thank you, thank you for the great posting!

Flint Hill said:

Hey, I"m still here too! I'll follow this thread as long as I can draw breath. :)

How about Dock Boggs's "Calvary"? It's about the grimmest Easter song I know. Lyrics arehere, The Carter Family and lots of others, Ralph Stanley among the, recorded it as "On a Hill Lone and Gray" with a different and far less spooky tune.

It's also out there in an earlier and greatly lengthened version as"There's a Hill Lone and Grey".Beverly Francis Carradinepublished it in 1896 with a tune that resembles the one that the Carters used later.

Dock's version reads like a classical murder ballad. In the first few bars, Dock's tune resembles the one he used for "Reuben's Train". I'd love to find out more about the tune if anyone knows.

Dock's tuning is supposed to bef#CGAD (according to Don Zepp).




--
Robin T
one of the Moderators here :)
Keep a song in your heart!
Flint Hill
Flint Hill
@flint-hill
4 years ago
85 posts

Hey, I"m still here too! I'll follow this thread as long as I can draw breath. :)

How about Dock Boggs's "Calvary"? It's about the grimmest Easter song I know. Lyrics arehere, The Carter Family and lots of others, Ralph Stanley among the, recorded it as "On a Hill Lone and Gray" with a different and far less spooky tune.

It's also out there in an earlier and greatly lengthened version as"There's a Hill Lone and Grey".Beverly Francis Carradinepublished it in 1896 with a tune that resembles the one that the Carters used later.

Dock's version reads like a classical murder ballad. In the first few bars, Dock's tune resembles the one he used for "Reuben's Train". I'd love to find out more about the tune if anyone knows.

Dock's tuning is supposed to bef#CGAD (according to Don Zepp).

Ellen Rice
Ellen Rice
@ellen-rice
4 years ago
46 posts

78.giftoo funny


Richard Venneman said:

Every song I play is mournful and spooky, at least according to my wife. :-)
Dusty Turtle
Dusty Turtle
@dusty-turtle
4 years ago
1,024 posts

I think you got your wish, Flint. Here we are three years later.

Well, it's not a traditional ballad or anything, but David Schnaufer's versionof the Hank Williams tune "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cryhas moved me ever since I discovered the dulcimer. Elvis called it the "saddest song I've ever heard in my life."

Did you ever see the Robin weep

When leaves begin to die

That means he's lost the will to live

I'm so lonesome I could cry

You football fans might like to hear Terry Bradshaw sing the song, too. Weren't the seventies great?

Flint Hill said:

I sure am enjoying this thread. Hope it has a long and productive life



--
Dusty T., Northern California
Site Moderator

As a musician, you have to keep one foot back in the past and one foot forward into the future.
-- Dizzy Gillespie
robert schuler
robert schuler
@robert-schuler
4 years ago
263 posts
Tam Lin and Allison Gross... Bob.
Gale A Barr
Gale A Barr
@gale-a-barr
4 years ago
41 posts

Tim and Ken,

Those are great suggestions! I have found the SMN for these and can't wait to try them. I have been listening to some Youtube verions also of all of the suggestions. I am sure others reading this thread appreciate these ideas for haunting tunes too.

Ken, I have played a few tune in Aeolian mode after reading Strumlia's blog about it and really like it. That would be perfect for these types of tunes.

joe sanguinette
joe sanguinette
@joe-sanguinette
4 years ago
92 posts

a ballad called "the letter edged in black." evidently years ago a letter informing of the death of a loved one would

have a black border around the envelope to warn of sad and shocking news.

also "the little rosewood casket" as aclose second.

Ken Hulme
Ken Hulme
@ken-hulme
4 years ago
1,754 posts

The Border Scots ballad called Lament of the Border Widow, in Aeolian Mode (DAC if you like the key of D). Aeolian Moe is great for all those eerie, 'fingernails on chalkboard' mournful songs.

My love, he built me a bonny bower
And clad it o'er with lily flower
A bonnier bower you ne'er did see
Than my true love he built for me

There came a man by middle day
He spied his sport and went away
And brought the King that very night,
Who broke my bower and slew my knight

He slew my knight to me so dear
He slew my knight and seized his gear
My servants all for life did flee
And left me in extremity

I sewed his shroud, making my moan
I watched his corpse, myself alone
I watched his body night and day
No living creature came that way

I took his body on my back
And whiles I walked and whiles I sat
I digged a grave and laid him in,
And happed him with the turf so green

Oh, don't you think my heart was sore,
As I laid the earth on his yellow hair
Oh, don't you think my heart was woe,
As I turned about, away to go

No living man I'll love again
Since that my lovely knight is slain
With just one lock of his yellow hair
I'll chain my heart forevermore

Timothy
Timothy
@timothy
4 years ago
11 posts

My very favorite to play and sing is "The Twa Sisters", where one sister drowns the other, then some guy comes along and makes a violin out of her body parts. In D Mixolydian.

Second favorite is "Long Black Veil" which also works well on the dulcimer, in G Ionian.

Gale A Barr
Gale A Barr
@gale-a-barr
4 years ago
41 posts

Thanks John! I will try to get a copy of that!


updated by @gale-a-barr: 07/15/15 06:13:31AM
John Henry
John Henry
@john-henry
4 years ago
339 posts

Hello Gale, I used to take the dulcimer into schools a while back, and often used a simple song from Jean Ritchie's book ' Singing Family of The Cumberlands'. It can be found on pages 11/12 , "There was an Old Woman, all skin and bones', simple tune, nicely minor, easy to tailor to suit your audience, with a great 'punch line' ending ?

good luck in your search

JohnH

Gale A Barr
Gale A Barr
@gale-a-barr
4 years ago
41 posts

That one sounds like fun, Shawn. I will give that a try.

Shawn McCurdy
Shawn McCurdy
@shawn-mccurdy
4 years ago
13 posts

Janita Baker teaches Three Blinde Mice by Ravenscroft in her Rounds and Canons workshop. This original version is in a minor key and it's dirge-like and quite creepy. I can't offer up Janita's tab, but here's an article which contains standard musical notation for the minor key version, about halfway down. If you know the notes on your fretboard you can easily tab it out:

http://strangewayes.wordpress.com/2013/05/04/late-period-english-rounds/

Gale A Barr
Gale A Barr
@gale-a-barr
4 years ago
41 posts

I found this old thread as it is now October and Halloween is approaching.Anyone have some additional tabs, links, or ideasof spooky songs to play on the dulcimer? I can pick some of the easier, contemporary ones that come to mind - "Addams Family" that are just for but I am sure others out there can think of others? Tubular Bellsused in the Exorcistwould be interesting....

Brian G.
Brian G.
@brian-g
7 years ago
107 posts
I love to play many tunes that fit the description or mournful, spooky or lonesome (well, maybe not "spooky"), but one of my favorites is Neil Gow's Lament for the Death of his Second Wife. I just think it's an incredibly beautiful tune. So simple, and yet so moving when played well.
robert schuler
robert schuler
@robert-schuler
7 years ago
263 posts
John I like your version on dulcimer. I recently learned the song on low whistle and I am presently working out a minor key version for dulcimer... Bob.

John Henry said:

Sorry Bob, should have mentioned that I posted it under another name commonly given to this tune, "Velentia Harbour" (posted oct 12 th, 2010)

John

John Henry
John Henry
@john-henry
7 years ago
339 posts

Sorry Bob, should have mentioned that I posted it under another name commonly given to this tune, "Velentia Harbour" (posted oct 12 th, 2010)

John

John Henry
John Henry
@john-henry
7 years ago
339 posts

Hello Bob, this is one of my favourites also !!! I cannot sing for toffee, but did manage to post a fair attempt at it on this site? You might be interested in a listen?

best wishes

JohnHrobert schuler said:

A slow air called...Amhran Na Leabhair. Don't ask me to pronounce it but the alternate name is, Song of the Books and or Valencia Harbor. Its a song about an 18th century professor who is sent to a new school. He loads all his worldly possessions on a ship including his beloved books while he travels by land. The ship sinks and all his books are lost. He morns the loss of his books. Its a popular song on the whistle and is sung in a style the name of which I forget. That is sung almost in one continious way without breaks or pauses a very mornful sound.. Bob.
robert schuler
robert schuler
@robert-schuler
7 years ago
263 posts
A slow air called...Amhran Na Leabhair. Don't ask me to pronounce it but the alternate name is, Song of the Books and or Valencia Harbor. Its a song about an 18th century professor who is sent to a new school. He loads all his worldly possessions on a ship including his beloved books while he travels by land. The ship sinks and all his books are lost. He morns the loss of his books. Its a popular song on the whistle and is sung in a style the name of which I forget. That is sung almost in one continious way without breaks or pauses a very mornful sound.. Bob.
Ann Evans
Ann Evans
@ann-evans
7 years ago
4 posts
Me too.... My playing.... Good thing I live alone otherwise I might run someone off... Lol ;).. I'm working on singing (!) ' one day at a time' ... Real spooky?!?

Richard Venneman said:
Every song I play is mournful and spooky, at least according to my wife. :-)
Jan Potts
Jan Potts
@jan-potts
7 years ago
440 posts

Autumn Leaves (you know....the ones that drift by your window....)

October is a Gypsy Lass (if anyone else other than my family knows this, I'd love to hear from them)

Picardy, a French Carol in a minor key ("Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence" in the 1906 English Hymnal)




--
Jan Potts, Lexington, KY
Site Moderator

"Use what talents you possess; the woods would be very silent if no birds sang there except those that sang best." Henry Van Dyke
Sarah Mills
Sarah Mills
@sarah-mills
7 years ago
1 posts

My favorite spooky song "Have You Seen the Ghost of Tom" It reminds me of one day many moons ago when I was driving my six year old grand daughter to school and she taughta song she was learning to sing. I was happy to find it in one of my dulcimer books. I love the way it sounds onmy dulcimer.

Beth Hansen-Buth
Beth Hansen-Buth
@beth-hansen-buth
7 years ago
45 posts

Thanks! I'll keep an eye out for it! Grin.gif


folkfan said:

I'm working on a tab for it, but my tabs are simple melody lines with the lyrics with no chords. At the moment I'm working from two slightly different SMN melodies and trying to get them to fit the music I have playing from a third source. Usually after going through the process of adding and subtracting notes I end up with a final tab. When I get there, I'll put it up.

Beth Hansen-Buth said:
I love unusual ballads! Would you happen to have TAB or lyrics with chords that you'd care to share for this one? 63.gifI'm intrigued...

folkfan said:
The Rolling of the Stones. An unusual ballad in that it actual deals with magic and spelling.


Flint Hill
Flint Hill
@flint-hill
7 years ago
85 posts
I sure am enjoying this thread. Hope it has a long and productive life, and many thanks to all who have posted so far.
folkfan
@folkfan
7 years ago
455 posts

Dancing At Whitsun is a favorite of mine. Had a chance a few years ago to see the Hedge Row Crown in the Tower display of the English Crown Jewels. This year it wasn't there. When I asked a Gentleman Warder what happened to it, he was surprised that I even knew what a Hedge Row was and why they were important enough to be the base for a crown designed for the Queen.

Tim Hart's rendition of the song is just beautiful.

john p said:

Sad - Well, folowing Paul's suggestion above, the tune of 'The Week Before Easter' was used for a song called 'Dancing at Whitsun' and tells of the ladies left without their husbands and sweethearts who never returned from the Great War.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d9bH1XsWHgY

Spooky - Well Childe #6 is very 'Wierd', usually known as 'Willie's Lady', 'The Nine Witch Knots' or 'The Loaf of Wax'. This has it all, the cruelty of the Step Mother, the torment of the Bride, the resolutness of the Husband, the resourcefullness of the Faithfull Retainer ...

The Nine Witch Knots refers to the binding of one of the most terrible curses that could be laid on any woman.

Oddly, the tune usually used for this ballad(due to Ray Fisher) is a somewhat raucous and slightly maudlin cider drinking song from Brittainy.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=64rU4XBV8rg

john p

john p
john p
@john-p
7 years ago
211 posts

Sad - Well, folowing Paul's suggestion above, the tune of 'The Week Before Easter' was used for a song called 'Dancing at Whitsun' and tells of the ladies left without their husbands and sweethearts who never returned from the Great War.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d9bH1XsWHgY

Spooky - Well Childe #6 is very 'Wierd', usually known as 'Willie's Lady', 'The Nine Witch Knots' or 'The Loaf of Wax'. This has it all, the cruelty of the Step Mother, the torment of the Bride, the resolutness of the Husband, the resourcefullness of the Faithfull Retainer ...

The Nine Witch Knots refers to the binding of one of the most terrible curses that could be laid on any woman.

Oddly, the tune usually used for this ballad(due to Ray Fisher) is a somewhat raucous and slightly maudlin cider drinking song from Brittainy.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=64rU4XBV8rg

john p

folkfan
@folkfan
7 years ago
455 posts

Beth, I just got another version of The Rolling of the Stones, the lyrics are a bit different than those I know but the tune is the same. In this version the pretty Susie doesn't charm the young man from his grave, because after receiving his fatal wound, no one buries him. They just take him to the woods and lay him on the ground. YUCK.

It's sung by Oscar Brand on the album recorded by Jean Ritchie, Oscar Brand and David Sear, title "A Folk Concert In Town Hall, New York". I got it from iTunes.

folkfan said:

I'm working on a tab for it, but my tabs are simple melody lines with the lyrics with no chords. At the moment I'm working from two slightly different SMN melodies and trying to get them to fit the music I have playing from a third source. Usually after going through the process of adding and subtracting notes I end up with a final tab. When I get there, I'll put it up.

Beth Hansen-Buth said:
I love unusual ballads! Would you happen to have TAB or lyrics with chords that you'd care to share for this one? 63.gifI'm intrigued...

folkfan said:
The Rolling of the Stones. An unusual ballad in that it actual deals with magic and spelling.


folkfan
@folkfan
7 years ago
455 posts
I'm working on a tab for it, but my tabs are simple melody lines with the lyrics with no chords. At the moment I'm working from two slightly different SMN melodies and trying to get them to fit the music I have playing from a third source. Usually after going through the process of adding and subtracting notes I end up with a final tab. When I get there, I'll put it up.

Beth Hansen-Buth said:
I love unusual ballads! Would you happen to have TAB or lyrics with chords that you'd care to share for this one? 63.gifI'm intrigued...

folkfan said:
The Rolling of the Stones. An unusual ballad in that it actual deals with magic and spelling.

Beth Hansen-Buth
Beth Hansen-Buth
@beth-hansen-buth
7 years ago
45 posts
I love unusual ballads! Would you happen to have TAB or lyrics with chords that you'd care to share for this one? 63.gifI'm intrigued...

folkfan said:
The Rolling of the Stones. An unusual ballad in that it actual deals with magic and spelling.
Richard Venneman
Richard Venneman
@richard-venneman
7 years ago
4 posts
Every song I play is mournful and spooky, at least according to my wife. :-)
Flint Hill
Flint Hill
@flint-hill
7 years ago
85 posts

Pretty Polly -- Dock Boggs.

Wife of Usher's Well, either by Hedy West or M&E Carthy. Two different songs, really.

 
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